"I don't want to do bed side nursing"...SAY WHAT! - page 7

had a couple different nursing students say: "well, i'm going to school so i don't have to do bed side nursing". one even told me she want to work in plastic surg. office, not at the bed side. ... Read More

  1. by   RGN1
    I like my time spent washing my patients etc (it's normal for RN's here to do everything because we don't have "techs" to do it for us). You can really get to know things about them that may be very important, you also get the chance to assess their skin etc properly. I think that nurses should start by the bedside - as you put it - because that's where you learn the things you really need to know.

    Oh & a word on plastics (as that comment was contained in the OP's posts - & others too) - if that nurse (or others here) think it's easy then you're totally kidding yourself. We have a lot of cosmetic surgery at our hospital & I hate caring for them - they are THE WOST patients in the whole place - call bell jockeys, moan for England & are the biggest whimps alive - scream just when you take out their cannula's - no siree - give me an 88 year od with TIA's any time over them!!!

    Of course that doesn't mean I'm not as sweet as pie to them while I'm in their room but man if only they knew what I was thinking - I mean they chose to have the op - very few have their surgery for genuine reasons & those that do are not the gripers anyhow, ever! They all have histories of depression or panic disorders etc & you often wonder why on earth they're there because just having surgery will never fix the problems in their minds.

    No - cosmetics is not fun at all - you can keep it!!

    LOL - now you'll see the only job available to me when I come over to the USA will be .........in a cosmetic surgery clininc - AAAUUURGHHH!
  2. by   2008rn2be
    I totally agree with your definition of bed side nursing. What I disagree with is when some one else implied that we should all start out on the med/surg floor doing bed side nursing and then work our way up. The point I was trying to make is that I am not interested in spending much time doing bed side nursing in MED/SURG. It's impossible to believe or think that every one should or will start out with the same interest. It is an individuals right to explore what interests them.
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Pfleger23
    I would consider home health care to fall under bedside nursing. You are taking care of patients, and you have the additional hardship of not having anyone around to ask questions or get help from.

    The best part of working on my unit is my relationship with my collegues, both RN's, aides, and some of the docs and NP's.

    I realize that my opinions may seem hardcore to some, but I blame it on many years of military experience that gave me the attitude that you don't quit just because something is difficult, you dig in and find the strength to overcome it. That and maybe the fact that I'm too ignorant to realize that no sane persone would stay on a telemetry floor for more than a couple of years. Yeah.. that's probably the biggest factor.

    I stand corrected, (thanks)... homecare should be considered as bedside nursing. I think I should reword it to say that I am not interested in floor nursing, or med/surg.
  4. by   Sheri257
    I was planning on working at the bedside when I graduate but ... the reality of what nursing is really like has changed my mind.

    With few exceptions, bedside nursing is pure hell. The nurses are mean, the patients are mean and management is always rewarding you with cuts in benefits like retirement.

    I'm an older student who doesn't have yet another year to waste with no retirement benefits and, on top of that, having to take abuse from nurses and patients a like.

    So, that's why I'm out of the bedside. If that doesn't make me a nurse, I really don't care. I'm not going to be a martyr for this profession or any other. Been there, done that ... I'm not going to do that again.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 6, '06
  5. by   Quickbeam
    management is always rewarding you with cuts in benefits like retirement.
    This probably deserves its own thread. I, too, was a career changer,older nurse as a new grad. Hospital retirement plans tend to be dreadful. I'd read the fine print and find that my hospital intended to put as low as 1/2% aside for my pension, if I got vested. I knew many nurses who ended up with pitiful pensions after a lifetime with one hospital. It is one of ther main reasons why I left hospital work for a government job....pension.

    It is a very different issue at 40 than it is at 20.
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I knew many nurses who ended up with pitiful pensions after a lifetime with one hospital. It is one of ther main reasons why I left hospital work for a government job....pension.

    It is a very different issue at 40 than it is at 20.
    Yep ... government pension is what I'm going for, definitely. Virtually all of the hospitals have cut pension benefits in my area. I am NOT going to be a pauper with no pension in my '60s.

    No profession is worth that ... period.

    :typing
  7. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from Pfleger23
    Well, I've heard a lot of this stuff from new grads, and others, and in my opinion if you don't want to do bedside nursing then you really aren't a nurse. That's what nursing is all about. They should call it something else when this isn't involved.

    I've seen quite a few come into the hospital with the sole goal of making money to get through anesthesia or NP school so they can get away from all that nasty patient care. Not that those roles aren't demanding and necessary, it's just that the motivation often seems to be an aversion to actually dealing with patients. Some of the folks in question seem disdainful of "floor nursing" like the so-called RN in the original post by the NA.

    And hey, wiping someone's butt who can't do it for themselves can be an avenue of personal and spiritual growth. Talk about letting go of ego!

    I'll end my diatribe by seconding the person who said she would prefer leaving the patient care to those who care about patients.

    ***Disclaimer*** The above may not be the opinion of everyone and should be taken as an expression of opinion and not a laying of claim to ultimate truth. Thank you, and have a pleasant tomorrow!
    OK- question for you. All of the non-bedside jobs that nurses can (and do) have, like telenursing, utilization management, case management, clinical research- why are these not nursing jobs, if (a) the job requires a nursing license, and (b) the nursing knowledge of the individual is an integral part of the day-to-day work? I worked with some clinical research coordinators who *weren't* nurses, and every single one of them had problems doing the job well. What about the nurses that work in pharmacovigilance for the drug manufacturers? I would much rather have a nurse working in that sort of job. The fact is, modern healthcare not only has more opportunities for nurses away from the bedside- it has more opportunities, period.

    As for the spiritual growth that comes with cleaning someone up- it sure didn't do that for me. I didn't think I was above doing it, and I'd signed up for the job- but no, it certainly wasn't any sort of zen-like experience.

    As for the aversion to dealing with patients- yes, some people specifically seek out non-bedside jobs because they feel patient care is beneath them. I'd argue that most of us who work away from the bedside had different motivators. Did I *like* doing bedside care? Nope. I did not. For a number of reasons- but not because I thought it was 'beneath' me. It's just not my bag. I knew it probably wouldn't be, and I didn't plan on doing it for very long, as I knew I wanted to go into research.

    I don't like 'hands-on' nursing care. Not just the excrement, either- I don't like starting IVs, ambulating people, passing meds, and the like. It's the 'hands' part of 'hands-on' that doesn't work for me. I'm not touchy-feely, either. I'm much happier in a job that requires a ton of reading, analyzing, writing, teaching- not doing stuff with my hands. And I'm a lot better at it, too. Drop me in front of a computer all day, and I'm happy as a clam.

    Does that mean I provided lazy, substandard care? Not at all. I gave 110%, because that's what I do in my work, and my life. A preceptor once told me I did the best assessments she'd ever seen in a new grad. I have a keen ear, and frequently caught pulmonary issues very early. But if you handed me a bunch of stuff to set up for a CVP line, for instance, I'm all thumbs. I stink at replicating physical tasks that someone shows me. I always have. I need to write down the steps and intelletualize it. I also function very well when I'm not given deadlines or schedules- I'm the type to wake at 3 AM with a great idea and plop down at the computer to write. I'm *not* good at following multiple MAR schedules, planning how much time it's going to take me to do other tasks, and dealing with six million interruptions from people who need me to do things NOW.

    Do any of the traits I just listed make me smart/stupid/a good nurse/a bad nurse/a good person/a bad person? I think not. They *do* make me better suited for research than for bedside care.

    I firmly believe people should play to their strengths. There's no benefit to hammering away at something if you're simply not right for it. There's a show on Discovery right now about a group of men climbing Everest. A couple of them had to turn back before the summit because- for various reasons- they weren't physically able to go further. Were they to push on, they would probably die.

    I see nursing in much the same way. I don't think I'm going out on a limb to say that those of us who don't 'fit' at the bedside are likely to make mistakes.

    I say all of this because Pfleger23's post, like many others, narrowly defines the field of nursing. I've heard many, many nurses say things like, "I 'just' want to stay at the bedside," or "I 'only' want to be a floor nurse, not NP/CRNA/etc.". What the heck? I think statements like these demean bedside nurses as much as the title of this thread. They reinforce the opinion held by much of the public that bedside care nurses are low-skilled buttwipers.

    By regarding nurses with other interests and aptitudes as more- or less- 'nursey', we continue to perpetuate the 'nurse as angel of mercy' myth the public believes. Whether you're an NP, CRNA, bedside care LPN or RN, case management nurse, research nurse- you're a nurse *first*. That means far more than the number of rear ends you do/don't clean. It's about your knowledge, your training, and your skills, regardless of where you use them. The sooner we start acting like it, the sooner the public will understand our profession.
  8. by   Doog
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    OK- question for you. All of the non-bedside jobs that nurses can (and do) have, like telenursing, utilization management, case management, clinical research- why are these not nursing jobs, if (a) the job requires a nursing license, and (b) the nursing knowledge of the individual is an integral part of the day-to-day work? I worked with some clinical research coordinators who *weren't* nurses, and every single one of them had problems doing the job well. What about the nurses that work in pharmacovigilance for the drug manufacturers? I would much rather have a nurse working in that sort of job. The fact is, modern healthcare not only has more opportunities for nurses away from the bedside- it has more opportunities, period.

    As for the spiritual growth that comes with cleaning someone up- it sure didn't do that for me. I didn't think I was above doing it, and I'd signed up for the job- but no, it certainly wasn't any sort of zen-like experience.

    As for the aversion to dealing with patients- yes, some people specifically seek out non-bedside jobs because they feel patient care is beneath them. I'd argue that most of us who work away from the bedside had different motivators. Did I *like* doing bedside care? Nope. I did not. For a number of reasons- but not because I thought it was 'beneath' me. It's just not my bag. I knew it probably wouldn't be, and I didn't plan on doing it for very long, as I knew I wanted to go into research.

    I don't like 'hands-on' nursing care. Not just the excrement, either- I don't like starting IVs, ambulating people, passing meds, and the like. It's the 'hands' part of 'hands-on' that doesn't work for me. I'm not touchy-feely, either. I'm much happier in a job that requires a ton of reading, analyzing, writing, teaching- not doing stuff with my hands. And I'm a lot better at it, too. Drop me in front of a computer all day, and I'm happy as a clam.

    Does that mean I provided lazy, substandard care? Not at all. I gave 110%, because that's what I do in my work, and my life. A preceptor once told me I did the best assessments she'd ever seen in a new grad. I have a keen ear, and frequently caught pulmonary issues very early. But if you handed me a bunch of stuff to set up for a CVP line, for instance, I'm all thumbs. I stink at replicating physical tasks that someone shows me. I always have. I need to write down the steps and intelletualize it. I also function very well when I'm not given deadlines or schedules- I'm the type to wake at 3 AM with a great idea and plop down at the computer to write. I'm *not* good at following multiple MAR schedules, planning how much time it's going to take me to do other tasks, and dealing with six million interruptions from people who need me to do things NOW.

    Do any of the traits I just listed make me smart/stupid/a good nurse/a bad nurse/a good person/a bad person? I think not. They *do* make me better suited for research than for bedside care.

    I firmly believe people should play to their strengths. There's no benefit to hammering away at something if you're simply not right for it. There's a show on Discovery right now about a group of men climbing Everest. A couple of them had to turn back before the summit because- for various reasons- they weren't physically able to go further. Were they to push on, they would probably die.

    I see nursing in much the same way. I don't think I'm going out on a limb to say that those of us who don't 'fit' at the bedside are likely to make mistakes.

    I say all of this because Pfleger23's post, like many others, narrowly defines the field of nursing. I've heard many, many nurses say things like, "I 'just' want to stay at the bedside," or "I 'only' want to be a floor nurse, not NP/CRNA/etc.". What the heck? I think statements like these demean bedside nurses as much as the title of this thread. They reinforce the opinion held by much of the public that bedside care nurses are low-skilled buttwipers.

    By regarding nurses with other interests and aptitudes as more- or less- 'nursey', we continue to perpetuate the 'nurse as angel of mercy' myth the public believes. Whether you're an NP, CRNA, bedside care LPN or RN, case management nurse, research nurse- you're a nurse *first*. That means far more than the number of rear ends you do/don't clean. It's about your knowledge, your training, and your skills, regardless of where you use them. The sooner we start acting like it, the sooner the public will understand our profession.
    I think you hit the nail squarely on the head with this post! Everyone should play to their strengths.
  9. by   Nitngale
    Quote from lizz
    I was planning on working at the bedside when I graduate but ... the reality of what nursing is really like has changed my mind.

    With few exceptions, bedside nursing is pure hell. The nurses are mean, the patients are mean and management is always rewarding you with cuts in benefits like retirement.

    I'm an older student who doesn't have yet another year to waste with no retirement benefits and, on top of that, having to take abuse from nurses and patients a like.

    So, that's why I'm out of the bedside. If that doesn't make me a nurse, I really don't care. I'm not going to be a martyr for this profession or any other. Been there, done that ... I'm not going to do that again.

    :typing
    You know I can see your point on staff and management but the patients are ill and have more reason to be 'mean'. I don't get some of you guys. Nursing is about sick, injured, and old people. It's not modeling or acting. I think the main problem today with many people that go into nursing , especially those whom wouldn't have been interested in it years ago is the money factor. Twenty or thirty years ago, to be a nurse required a BSN, you didn't get paid sh*t and the doctors still treated you like crap. If you don't like sick, injured or old people------become a doctor
  10. by   buddiage
    Quote from lizz
    Yep ... government pension is what I'm going for, definitely. Virtually all of the hospitals have cut pension benefits in my area. I am NOT going to be a pauper with no pension in my '60s.

    No profession is worth that ... period.

    :typing
    Good point.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Nitngale
    You know I can see your point on staff and management but the patients are ill and have more reason to be 'mean'. I don't get some of you guys. Nursing is about sick, injured, and old people. It's not modeling or acting. I think the main problem today with many people that go into nursing , especially those whom wouldn't have been interested in it years ago is the money factor. Twenty or thirty years ago, to be a nurse required a BSN, you didn't get paid sh*t and the doctors still treated you like crap. If you don't like sick, injured or old people------become a doctor
    I don't think even the most greedy nursing students have the illusion that nursing is modeling or acting. :chuckle

    Yep ... I went into it for the money, no question about it. Lots of nurses are, old or young. When the state of California substantially raised RN pay, the vacancy rate dropped by 60 percent in just a few months.

    You see the same thing everywhere: when the pay goes up, the RN vacancy rate goes down. People can say this and that about how it shouldn't be about the money but, when you look at the actual data, it is.

    I don't think it's a question of not liking sick or old people. That's a complete oversimplication of the problem. What I don't like is patients hitting you, cursing you, kicking you and spitting on you.

    I have a fundamental disagreement with the nursing profession's idea that you're supposed to take this kind of abuse just because they're "sick." And, the fact is ... a lot of RN's don't take it ... they quit.

    If I have to take that kind of abuse, then I want to be well compensated for it. If they're not going to do that then, I'm out.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 6, '06
  12. by   KIAN
    The profession of nursing requires all types. I love nursing just for that reason. I do not think you have to work the "floor" to pay your dues. Working the floor gives great experience but I don't think it is necessary to have to be a good nurse or a good NP.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Nitngale
    You know I can see your point on staff and management but the patients are ill and have more reason to be 'mean'. I don't get some of you guys. Nursing is about sick, injured, and old people. It's not modeling or acting.
    Sorry, but being sick, injured and old does not entitle people to be mean TO ANYONE!!!!! Especially those trying to help them.

    I really wish people would accepting escuses for bad behavior. Excusing it with "Oh, they are sick/old/tired/stressed (used especially with nasty MDs) just let's it go on. It is one thing to cry when you are sick, it is clearly abusive when you have a rational patient biting/kicking/insulting those trying to help them or flashing the nursing staff.

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