"I don't want to do bed side nursing"...SAY WHAT! - page 6

had a couple different nursing students say: "well, i'm going to school so i don't have to do bed side nursing". one even told me she want to work in plastic surg. office, not at the bed side. ... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from minimo
    So, call me a "bad nurse," but I don't particularly love "bedside nursing." I despise doing bed baths, I hate changing linens (sorry, I didn't go to college to tuck in sheets), and I'm happy that I work at a place where the NAs do all that. My intent has always been to work as a floor nurse for one year only, in order to gain the experience needed to become an NP. Yes, the NP job appeals to me, but being a floor nurse does not. I don't believe we need to "rise through the ranks" or "pay our dues," so to speak. If I had to, I would never have even considered nursing school. I'm in nursing because of the many *different* opportunities it provides and the whole-person philosophy it employs. For those who argue that NPs should have many years of experience in bedside nursing before pursuing the masters, I would point out that I don't see MDs doing that, and they have a lot more on their plates (and many NP programs now require residencies). Am I a bad nurse because I'm taking advantage of the new and improved nursing profession? Perhaps I should have become another pin-point-focused, jaded MD instead....
    All i could think after reading that post, especally after the last line was that a person doesn't have to become an MD to be jaded.
  2. by   buddiage
    Quote from minimo
    So, call me a "bad nurse," but I don't particularly love "bedside nursing." I despise doing bed baths, I hate changing linens (sorry, I didn't go to college to tuck in sheets), and I'm happy that I work at a place where the NAs do all that. My intent has always been to work as a floor nurse for one year only, in order to gain the experience needed to become an NP. Yes, the NP job appeals to me, but being a floor nurse does not. I don't believe we need to "rise through the ranks" or "pay our dues," so to speak. If I had to, I would never have even considered nursing school. I'm in nursing because of the many *different* opportunities it provides and the whole-person philosophy it employs. For those who argue that NPs should have many years of experience in bedside nursing before pursuing the masters, I would point out that I don't see MDs doing that, and they have a lot more on their plates (and many NP programs now require residencies). Am I a bad nurse because I'm taking advantage of the new and improved nursing profession? Perhaps I should have become another pin-point-focused, jaded MD instead....
    It's great that you have a goal. I, too, will advance after time being a floor nurse. However, you may not have intended for this to happen, but the flavor of your post comes across as "my attitude stinks."

    Clinical time is more valuable than classroom time and will greatly enhance anyone's competency. I don't think that any nurse should wait until they are 50 to become a NP, but spending some time in the hospital isn't bad. I don't think it's too bad to rise through the ranks a little or pay your dues a little... Right or wrong, people are going to be more respected that have done just that.
  3. by   PACNWNURSING
    I think nursing has indeed changed over the years. There are many more new opportunities today. Nurses do not need to go through the ritual of adult bedside nursing in order to prove they care for people or can do the job of a nurse. I really do wish, new nurses who wish to work in a hospital were given the opportunity in their first year to work in various units, OR, ER, Med/Surg, Peds, etc. in order to determine their interests before they apply for their first position. I think this would go a long way in alleviating first year burn out.
  4. by   minimo
    I can see where you got the idea that "my attitude stinks," because I tend to write out of passion and sometimes frustration. Nevertheless, I can't help but notice that when I share my goals with some nurses who have been in the profession for a long time, I'm often met with pure adversity and negativity; it never fails that someone tells me I need 5-10 years on the floor before going back to school (which I obviously disagree with). I get even worse responses if I tell someone I went into nursing school with exclusive plans to become an NP.

    I do understand the value of experience, and that's why I'm working where I am now and didn't go straight into an MSN program like some of my former classmates did. (Afterall, an MSN is a graduate degree, and college students are all but expected to start a graduate program right away.) I'm glad to be working in my unit, and I like my job, but I'm driven to pursue more, and I want to do it while I'm still relatively young. So, I don't see anything wrong with seeing "bedside nursing" as a means to my end. Yes, those skills will benefit me and my patients in the future...I will be the first to agree, and I never discounted that. I completely respect and applaud those who love bedside nursing...I think it's great, and it takes a special person to do it well. We don't all love doing research analysis papers or creating those mile-long, impossible care plans they make us write in school, but we do always take something valuable from them that will aid us in our practice as nurses. Ditto for baths and linens.
  5. by   RNfromMN
    Quote from buddiage
    I don't think it's too bad to rise through the ranks a little or pay your dues a little... Right or wrong, people are going to be more respected that have done just that.
    :yeahthat:
  6. by   miko014
    Quote from minimo
    My intent has always been to work as a floor nurse for one year only, in order to gain the experience needed to become an NP.

    "bedside nursing" as a means to my end.
    Yes! Exactly! I'm a believer in experience, but I have never said that anyone has to spend 5 years in med/surg! I think one year of bedside nursing, (just about) anywhere in any hospital is all you need. Use that as a stepping stone toward what you want to do. The point is, you use yoru skills, you deal with pts, you touch, and you see things, you learn things you never could in school, and it just makes yout that much better in whatever else you want to do. I don't care if you work cardiac, peds, med/surg, or someplace else. I just think that experience is invaluable.
  7. by   macspuds
    Amen fine people.
    If I'm ever sick, I would fight to have you care for me.
    I don't understand some of the "wonder nurses" that come out of school these days.
    macspuds
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    I have to also say that times have changed and that we are now directed to go where we like moreso than going through the ranks as so many have done in the past. In my case, my job paid my way through school...I was on a paid leave of absence until I got my license as a practical nurse. I expected to be sent to med-surg to 'pay my dues', however, as soon as I got my license, I was told by the DON that I would be returning back to the clinic I worked as an aide to be a nurse, but had to work six weeks in med-surg. After being up there for those 6 weeks, I found that I was grateful that I am now back in the clinic. My experience on med-surg showed me disorganization and were really not welcoming to new grad nurses, even though they knew me. I didn't have it as bad as new hires, but, I was nervous each time I worked the floor. From what I saw there, and hear and read on many threads here and elsewhere, I found that bedside nursing per se is not for me, except for private duty. I have a case that I do on weekends, and I am able to provide total care to the patient. I don't have to rush, take short cuts or deal with catty co-workers. No, bedside nursing is not for me. Even as an LPN I have choices, and for me, the main job will be the clinic and side jobs will be home care.
  9. by   lauralassie
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I have to also say that times have changed and that we are now directed to go where we like moreso than going through the ranks as so many have done in the past. In my case, my job paid my way through school...I was on a paid leave of absence until I got my license as a practical nurse. I expected to be sent to med-surg to 'pay my dues', however, as soon as I got my license, I was told by the DON that I would be returning back to the clinic I worked as an aide to be a nurse, but had to work six weeks in med-surg. After being up there for those 6 weeks, I found that I was grateful that I am now back in the clinic. My experience on med-surg showed me disorganization and were really not welcoming to new grad nurses, even though they knew me. I didn't have it as bad as new hires, but, I was nervous each time I worked the floor. From what I saw there, and hear and read on many threads here and elsewhere, I found that bedside nursing per se is not for me, except for private duty. I have a case that I do on weekends, and I am able to provide total care to the patient. I don't have to rush, take short cuts or deal with catty co-workers. No, bedside nursing is not for me. Even as an LPN I have choices, and for me, the main job will be the clinic and side jobs will be home care.

    sounds like it was the facility rather than the nursing. Too bad you had such a horrable expericence. There really are nurses out there who treat new nurses well. I do feel however, that as time passes and you do more things in nursing you will look back at that experience as valuable (maybe painful , but valuable non the less). I remember my first experience as a floor nurse in Fayetville North Carolina in a civilian hospital. It was a nightmare. Too many pt's , too little staff, red ants in pt's beds, staff members that didn't like me because I was from a northern state as well as a military wife. But, I learned so much there . Hang in there, sounds like your a nurse that wants to do what is good for you soul. I know you'll find that spot!
  10. by   MD1211
    I think it is silly for everyone to have to start on a med surg floor. It is great for some people and a nightmare for others. Personally, it's not for me. Now, this isn't saying I am above it or that I would be neglectful to patients. But I sure wouldn't enjoy it as much as working in another department. There are tons of different things you can do besides "bedside nursing" which I consider to be inpatient care waiting to come or go to surgery.

    Home Health sounds interesting, Cancer centers. Even OR sounds hundreds of times better to me. I just think people shouldn't get so riled up that others don't want to do exactly what they have done.
  11. by   sarahbellum
    I am a second semester nursing student, and a fellow student in my class one day actually said "Do we really have to do all the care when we graduate? Isn't that what the aide is for?" As a former aide/tech/unit secretary, I was stunned.

    And, she is still in the program, I guess I know what type of nurse she will be.
    :spin:
  12. by   Pfleger23
    Well, I've heard a lot of this stuff from new grads, and others, and in my opinion if you don't want to do bedside nursing then you really aren't a nurse. That's what nursing is all about. They should call it something else when this isn't involved.

    I've seen quite a few come into the hospital with the sole goal of making money to get through anesthesia or NP school so they can get away from all that nasty patient care. Not that those roles aren't demanding and necessary, it's just that the motivation often seems to be an aversion to actually dealing with patients. Some of the folks in question seem disdainful of "floor nursing" like the so-called RN in the original post by the NA.

    And hey, wiping someone's butt who can't do it for themselves can be an avenue of personal and spiritual growth. Talk about letting go of ego!

    I'll end my diatribe by seconding the person who said she would prefer leaving the patient care to those who care about patients.

    ***Disclaimer*** The above may not be the opinion of everyone and should be taken as an expression of opinion and not a laying of claim to ultimate truth. Thank you, and have a pleasant tomorrow!
  13. by   Pfleger23
    I would consider home health care to fall under bedside nursing. You are taking care of patients, and you have the additional hardship of not having anyone around to ask questions or get help from.

    The best part of working on my unit is my relationship with my collegues, both RN's, aides, and some of the docs and NP's.

    I realize that my opinions may seem hardcore to some, but I blame it on many years of military experience that gave me the attitude that you don't quit just because something is difficult, you dig in and find the strength to overcome it. That and maybe the fact that I'm too ignorant to realize that no sane persone would stay on a telemetry floor for more than a couple of years. Yeah.. that's probably the biggest factor.

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