"Honey" - page 5

After seeing coworkers call 85 year old women honey, and after being called honey by people my age (I'm only 23) I'm pretty much ready to puke. Do people really not know how patronizing that is? I... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from PeachPie
    If that bothers you, don't ever move down south. The southern hospitality would kill you.
    It may bother me, but so far it hasn't killed me.
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    It may bother me, but so far it hasn't killed me.
    why hello there honeypie?
    how is my favorite little sugarplum today?
    i was going to pm you but decided against it, knowing i couldn't refrain from showering you with my sugar-coated hugs and kisses. (lip-stick smudged smooch coming your way!!)

    sigh....
    are ya dead yet?
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    No, but the acid's burning my throat now lol. And i suddenly feel the need for a bath.

    I swear if a nurse really approached me talking like that, i'd hold up my ID band, and ask fora call to be put through to infection control.
  4. by   Antikigirl
    I have to keep myself in check with this ever since I worked in an LTC/ALF for 4 years. After that amount of time we all called eachother hon, honey, sweety, doll, love, etc. It actually did become second nature to me after that long.

    I caught myself once calling my charge nurse last week "hon" and she nabbed me on it and I appologized and told her to help me work on that (and she totally understood when I told her about the LTC/ALF...LOL!). So it is something I am working on too! I don't mean to offend anyone, it just became habit...and suprisingly a hard one to break! But I am getting there...LOL!

    I don't mind it said to me, kinda perks up my day a bit knowing my patients accept me enough to call me something nice...and fellow workers, it is nice too!!!!!!! But yep, trying to keep it in balance ...
  5. by   jb2u
    When I went through my CNA training, we were told to NEVER call pt's by "honey, sweetie, etc."

    In Nursing school, we are told to NEVER call pt's by "honey, sweetie, etc."

    I always address my pt's by Mr./Ms._____. If they insist on being called by their first name...("please, call me Mike") I will then call them Mr. Mike. I can't really grasp calling a stranger by their first names especially the elderly. That's just my "issue" or at least ONE of them!
  6. by   Elisheva
    It galls me when some 18 year old at a fast food restaurant calls me "sweetie" or "hon." That's assuming a familiarity that we don't have, thank you very much. And, I never called patients by such terms of endearment for the same reason. My issue, too. I don't care what anyone else does.
  7. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Tweety
    You are not alone.

    If you feel it patronizing, then it's patronizing and you should ask people to stop.

    I personally don't feel as you do, although I don't use those kinds of words to coworkers. I notice the people I work with call each other 'baby' and 'honey' sometimes. It doesn't sound patronizing when they do it. It doesn't bother me when they do it to me because it means I'm in their good graces at the moment.
    That's how I feel. I don't do it to coworkers but sometimes to patients. And it's not because I forgot their name.
  8. by   nurse4theplanet
    Just don't call me by any names that couldn't be said in front of my preacher and I'll be A-OK!!!
  9. by   MajorAl
    Okay, I'm an oooooold guy, 60 this year. IMHO calling a patient honey or sweetie when they are over 5 years old and don't live with you is demeaning. I can't remember names either, I've been in mental health nursing since 1970 and have learned to forget names when I walk out the door! I have found an alternative to calling someone honey or sweetie, I use the simple words "Sir" and "Ma'am". In over 30 years of nursing only 2 patients have complained about it. Both said basically the same thing: You're taking care of me and you're well educated. It doesn't feel right when you call me sir. Just my 2 cents worth. And if I might be so bold as to suggest it to anyone who has the habit of calling everyone honey or sweetie, try using Sir or Ma'am instead. Just seems more polite.
  10. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from MajorAl
    And if I might be so bold as to suggest it to anyone who has the habit of calling everyone honey or sweetie, try using Sir or Ma'am instead. Just seems more polite.
    I do that with everyone (even over the phone).

    Sometimes, someone would complain "Do I look/sound that old to you ?"

    I just apologise and say "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to offend you. That's just how I was raised. How do you prefer/How would you like to be called?"


    cheers,
  11. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    I do that with everyone (even over the phone).

    Sometimes, someone would complain "Do I look/sound that old to you ?"

    I just apologise and say "I'm sorry, I didn't mean to offend you. That's just how I was raised. How do you prefer/How would you like to be called?"


    cheers,
    That's the best approach sometimes, because no matter how good your intentions may be...someone is always going to get offended. You just have to apologize and move on.
  12. by   kranken_schwester
    I use terms of endearment with some patients to show familiarity...to me it's warmer than Mr. or Mrs., especially if you've worked with the patient enough to have some sort of rapport or relationship with him or her. I don't think saying "Hi, hon, how are you feeling?" is condescending, nor has anyone ever indicated to me that it bothers them.
  13. by   LaxNP
    Being a male in the nursing field I have never called anyone "honey" or anything of that sort. But I do agree that it is like nails on a chalk board even if it is good intentioned.

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