"Diploma Nurse preferable" - page 5

I've seen this is 2 adds in the newspaper, looking for nurses in management positions. "Diploma nurse preferabel". Any one else seen this?... Read More

  1. by   nrsang97
    I went to an ADN program. I think I was prepared. We were encouraged to talk with Dr's face to face. Our instructors sought out opprotunities for us to learn new skills. I have had new grads while I am precepting tell me that they never gave and IM injection. I found them the opprotunity to give one. I NEVER got to insert a NGT in clinical because I wasn't given the opprotunity but when the time came while I was in orinetation the nurse that taught me was patient with me and we got it in on the first try. We weren't allowed to start IV's as student nurses. I don't know about other states but in MI we wern't allowed to start IV's or draw blood. We had 2 8 hour days each week and 2 days of classes. Truthfully I don't think a BSN is better prepared for floor nursing than a ADN. BSN does get more managemnet and community health training.

    Here in MI Henry Ford Hospital has a accellerated nursing program in partnership with Henry Ford Community College. The students end up with a ADN degree in 16 months. Program goes all year round with no breaks.

    I also think that having positions like a CNA or extern during nursing school are a huge advantage. I know the 6 months as a extern and 3 months as a nurse assistant helped me.

    Bottom line clinicals are what YOU make of them. You have to be willing to soak up everything you can.
  2. by   psalm_55
    Bottom line clinicals are what YOU make of them. You have to be willing to soak up everything you can.[/quote]

    i agree.

    i graduated from an ADN program (during a time when all of my instructors had come out of a Diploma program) -- so it was pretty much a 'diploma program culture'. Went on to an EXCELLENT BSN program (where i had to take all but the fundamentals course) -- and then went on for MSN -- and now Teach in a Diploma program.

    i am biased toward Diploma programs though. i think there are several advantages to them. their relationship with the hospital means fewer constraints in med admin and participating / performing various procedures. the hospital has a vested interest in producing graduates who can function with relative independence in a reasonable period of time.

    also, lots of clinical hours = lots of hands on experiences. i always say 'i can read a book on how to swim -- but that doesn't mean i can swim'.

    also, i can know the recipe, but that doesn't make me a cook.

    how does anyone get good / or better at anything? practice. practice. practice.

    but, no matter which program a person attends, it comes down to what YOU make it.
  3. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from nrsang97
    I went to an ADN program. I think I was prepared. We were encouraged to talk with Dr's face to face. Our instructors sought out opprotunities for us to learn new skills. I have had new grads while I am precepting tell me that they never gave and IM injection. I found them the opprotunity to give one. I NEVER got to insert a NGT in clinical because I wasn't given the opprotunity but when the time came while I was in orinetation the nurse that taught me was patient with me and we got it in on the first try. We weren't allowed to start IV's as student nurses. I don't know about other states but in MI we wern't allowed to start IV's or draw blood. We had 2 8 hour days each week and 2 days of classes. Truthfully I don't think a BSN is better prepared for floor nursing than a ADN. BSN does get more managemnet and community health training.

    Here in MI Henry Ford Hospital has a accellerated nursing program in partnership with Henry Ford Community College. The students end up with a ADN degree in 16 months. Program goes all year round with no breaks.

    I also think that having positions like a CNA or extern during nursing school are a huge advantage. I know the 6 months as a extern and 3 months as a nurse assistant helped me.

    Bottom line clinicals are what YOU make of them. You have to be willing to soak up everything you can.
    I don't know when you graduated, but in my nursing college we were taught how to start iv's and were certainly able to start them as students and I live in MI as well. My program went all year round with no breaks as well.

close