"Diploma Nurse preferable" - page 2

I've seen this is 2 adds in the newspaper, looking for nurses in management positions. "Diploma nurse preferabel". Any one else seen this?... Read More

  1. by   lauralassie
    Ok , I called the places with this in the add. I actually know one of the managers. She said Diploma nurses are better prepared. She has found that over the years diploma nurses are better suited for these positions. Wow , that's a switch.
  2. by   traumaRUs
    Wow - I have not seen these ads. I wonder if it is a regional idiosyncracy?
  3. by   shrinkyrn
    Old Diploma nurse here, :hatparty: back in the day, we were basically used as staff, we lived nursing at the dorm attached to the hospital, 8 hour shifts just like staff, so yeah, we did get the skills. We could jump right in, especially if one worked at the hospital they "trained" at. It was nurses training, we did have college classes in the sciences related to nursing. As far as nursing, I wouldn't trade my diploma preparation for any other type. Remember, this was a LOOOONG time ago. I thought they phased out most of the other diploma programs, I didn't realize there were any more out there, except for MERIT. I've been in management positions, we had that as part of our curriculum as well, in fact all of our rotations were for a full 3 month semester, every day, all day.....We didn't wait for instructors, they were waiting for you
  4. by   gr8rnpjt
    I went to a Diploma program in the late 70's. We had lots of clinicals from the first semester all the way through. Most weeks we spend 50% of our days on the units and the other 50 in class. I remember the instructors telling us (at the time) that Degree nurses (BSN's specifically) were only getting a couple of half days a week clinical in their senior year. They were coming out scared and hesitant on the units with no people skills. But that was then and I don't know anything about what happens now. Are there still diploma schools around? (really, no flaming. I am simply stating what I heard in the late 70's)
  5. by   Kris10lp
    I went throught the LPN program last year and we heard alot about the fact that we were on clinicals from 730 to 3 and then RN students from most of the schools were usually only there from 730 to 11. Most of the floors and departments felt there weren't there enough time to even do anything. So when I started for the RN right after I chose the local hospital's Diploma School because they have smaller classes so more one-on-one with the instructors, not sitting waiting for them and more clinical time, not to mention they gave me the most credit toward the LPN that I already have where as at the local CC I would have had to repeat classes that I pretty much already went through. I do believe this may be the only diploma school left in NY State.
  6. by   Cherish
    The school I will be attending is a Diploma program. The oldest in the state over 100 years, so they have a huge reputation of turning out great RN's. I went to a Uniform store that is owned by an RN and told her what school I will be going to and she said you will get hired anywhere around here, they know the reputation of that 'great' school.

    Not saying anything bad about any other programs, think every program has a benefit. But this school does have more clinical hours and I guess since its part of the hospital its not like they have to contract hours like other schools. That could be why diploma programs have more hours, I took all the pre req's that the ADN program requires to at a CC. Have started on my pre req's for the RN-BSN program so when I am done I could go right on into that online.

    I love the reputation this school has very strict, military like (I'm a veteran so structure does not bother me), but produces great RN's, really great facility, has the most clinical hours, and the highest first time NCLEX pass rates. Think thats what counts when looking for any degree program.
  7. by   kiki0617
    Hi Cherish,

    Are your refering to Watts in Durham? If your are...I will taking the exam tomorrow. I currently live in MD, but I'm willing to relocate if I get into the program. I hear that they produce wonderful nurses and it is my first choice. I am familiar with the area because I went to college in Raleigh. Congrats on getting into the program. Best Wishes!

    KIKI0617
  8. by   maryloufu
    In my BSN program we worked one on one with preceptors at the hospitals for 12 hour shifts. So- If you wanted a good experience it was up to you to ask questions and get in there- if you were a wallflower then you didnt do as well.
  9. by   Cherish
    Yup it is Watts. I used to live in Baltimore in Pikesville my family still lives there. But yea after I left the army in September here at Bragg I applied to this program. Really did not know much except from nurses saying it was great. I tried to apply at CCBC but getting in there is the worst thing ever. Hope you do well.
  10. by   kiki0617
    How was the exam? Was it really hard?

    Kiki0617
  11. by   prchater
    Nursing practice is better in third world countries, in comparison here in the United States, nursing students here just dont get the hands-on they need coz students are already liable for there actions and nursing instructors doesnt want to loose their license from a mistake a student made, so no wonder nursing here in the US isnt that impressive as it is. I am a nurse in the Philippines and I had studied as a nursing student here in the United States too, so I know what I am talking about, and base on experience as a nursing student in both countries.
  12. by   mamason
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I went to a Diploma program in the late 70's. We had lots of clinicals from the first semester all the way through. Most weeks we spend 50% of our days on the units and the other 50 in class. I remember the instructors telling us (at the time) that Degree nurses (BSN's specifically) were only getting a couple of half days a week clinical in their senior year. They were coming out scared and hesitant on the units with no people skills. But that was then and I don't know anything about what happens now. Are there still diploma schools around? (really, no flaming. I am simply stating what I heard in the late 70's)
    Diploma schools are still around. Few and far between. I graduated from one 3 years ago in St. Louis, MO. Only one left in that state. Had no problem getting a job at all. My friend, who bridged in as an LPN,(now a RN) is in management at her hospital. She works side by side with 2 BSN RN's and runs circles around them. LOL... Now, this is not to say that all BSN RN's are like this, I'm only talking about these select 2. No generalization here.
    We got two full clinical days at the hospital every week. Learned a lot and enjoyed my clinicals more so than the actual classroom. We were free to do as much as we wanted at clinicals as long a s the instructor was there to supervise. May be that's the difference with the different type of schooling? I don't know...I'm glad I'm a diploma nurse though. It's different and I like that aspect of it.
  13. by   ajaxgirl
    Quote from lauralassie
    Ok , I called the places with this in the add. I actually know one of the managers. She said Diploma nurses are better prepared. She has found that over the years diploma nurses are better suited for these positions. Wow , that's a switch.
    Do you have a link? I find this hard to believe.

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