"Are you saved?" How do YOU deal with these types of questions - page 10

I would love to hear from some more experienced ppl some ways to deal with these types of personal questions. In my region, there are many devout evangelical Christian people who I think are... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from danu3
    to the op, if you ever decided to move west where people in general do not ask these kind of questions, do not go to seattle (it rains every day). come to california instead, we need nurses here.

    -dan
    it really does not rain every day! that's just what we tell californians to keep them from moving up here and jacking up our real estate prices!
    ruby
  2. by   live4today
    Quote from ruby vee
    it really does not rain every day! that's just what we tell californians to keep them from moving up here and jacking up our real estate prices!
    ruby

    californians already jacked up the real estate prices in colorado. many of them are flooding that state with a vengeance.
  3. by   danu3
    Quote from ruby vee
    it really does not rain every day! that's just what we tell californians to keep them from moving up here and jacking up our real estate prices!
    ruby
    ok ok... does it rain every other day?

    you mean i've been lied to?! man, i am moving up north...

    -dan
  4. by   danu3
    Quote from gwenith
    This question would rarely be asked here in Australia - just not culturally appropriate. You would get a better response asking someone what colour underwear they had on or whether they regularly washed thier underwear than asking if they "had been saved". Religion is considered to be an intensely personal thing. Oh! You can ask "What religion are you?" but you will be given a "look" before you are given an answer.

    Preaching in the workplace would be considered harrassment.
    This probably should be a different thread. But now I am interested in what are inappropriate culturally based questions patients ask in different parts of the world. I mean there is a pocket guide titled "Culture and Nursing Care", maybe we should have a similar pocket guide to different questions one might get ask (and how to answer them) in different parts of the world.

    -Dan
  5. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from cheerfuldoer
    why do some healthcare workers feel offended when a patient ask about your chosen faith? if you are proud to have no faith, say so. if you are proud to be part of a certain faith, own it. what makes this topic get people all riled up?

    i think the reason so many of us get riled up about it is that for the most part, patients don't ask us this because they genuinely want to hear about your religion. they want to tell you about theirs, and if you don't share their religion, they want to convince you that you ought to. i find that offensive. if you open the whole can of worms by actually answering that question, then you're inviting the whole evangelical experience. for one thing, i don't have time for you to try to convert me -- my other patients are puking, extubating themselves or bleeding. for another thing, i'm quite happy with my religion, and don't need to be converted. and for a third thing, the type of people who will ask "are you saved?" generally aren't too tolerant of other religions. so telling them that you're wiccan or jewish or muslim may rile them. another thing we don't want to deal with. although the op had a very caring and pc response, my response would be more along the lines of "i don't wish to discuss my personal beliefs, but if you'd like to discuss yours, i'll call the chaplain for you."
    [color=#4b0082]
    [color=#4b0082]ruby (catholic, if you really want to know)
  6. by   gwenith
    I think that would be a BIG book - so dependant - e.g. it is not culturally appropriate to mention the name of an aboriginal person who has died. So different and it varies from place even within a country.
  7. by   danu3
    Quote from gwenith
    I think that would be a BIG book - so dependant - e.g. it is not culturally appropriate to mention the name of an aboriginal person who has died. So different and it varies from place even within a country.
    Maybe it can be a series or something. I think it would be very interesting and informative.

    If the conversation need to mention an aboriginal person who has died, what is the culturally accept way of doing it? Have to do it indirectly or something?

    -Dan
  8. by   gwenith
    Happened recently with one of the elders who died
    Indigenous leaders have paid tribute to the man at the centre of a landmark compensation test case that internationally highlighted the plight of the Stolen Generations.

    Mr Gunner, whose first name cannot be mentioned for cultural reasons, died at his central Australian community of Utopia at the weekend. He was 56 years old.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems...4/s1338177.htm
  9. by   Charlie409
    Quote from porterwoman
    I would love to hear from some more experienced ppl some ways to deal with these types of personal questions. In my region, there are many devout evangelical Christian people who I think are genuinely concerned about the state of my soul. When folks like this are in the hospital, they're also feeling vulnerable, and they probably want to discuss their faith with someone who can help them feel more grounded. I am not necessarily that person.
    I get the questions, "Are you saved?" "What church do you go to?" "Have you accepted Jesus as your lord and savior?" etc. frequently in the hospital where I work. 1. I don't believe my personal religious stuff is my patients' business. 2. I do not want to be dishonest about my personal religious/lack of religious stuff.
    So far, the best I've come up with is, "It sounds like Christ is important in your life. Tell me more about that."
    Thoughts? Opinions?
    Rebecca, that agnostic porterwoman
    So far, the best I've come up with is, "It sounds like Christ is important in your life. Tell me more about that."
    This is the correct answer to give patients !!!!!!!!!!!!
    We are trained to respond to all of our patients physical, emotional, social, cultural and religious beliefs. All of these areas are a complex part of the patient profile of care, and all equally important. Let's face it, there are areas all people are uncomfortable to discuss, from religion, domestic abuse, politics, death, even to to sexuality. Our job is to provide the best nursing care, and comfort to the patient as a whole, not just their disease process. This is not about our comfort level......but it is about the patient's!
  10. by   RainbowSkye
    [QUOTE=danu3]Probably should be "For the Christians who like to ask people if they are saved..." is probably more accurate since they are lots of Christians who do not do that.


    You are absolutely right, and I apologize.

    It does bother me though. This is the first time I've lived in a place where the patient asked these kinds of questions - I'm learning.

    California sounds good.
  11. by   live4today
    Quote from ruby vee
    i think the reason so many of us get riled up about it is that for the most part, patients don't ask us this because they genuinely want to hear about your religion. they want to tell you about theirs, and if you don't share their religion, they want to convince you that you ought to. i find that offensive. if you open the whole can of worms by actually answering that question, then you're inviting the whole evangelical experience. for one thing, i don't have time for you to try to convert me -- my other patients are puking, extubating themselves or bleeding. for another thing, i'm quite happy with my religion, and don't need to be converted. and for a third thing, the type of people who will ask "are you saved?" generally aren't too tolerant of other religions. so telling them that you're wiccan or jewish or muslim may rile them. another thing we don't want to deal with. although the op had a very caring and pc response, my response would be more along the lines of "i don't wish to discuss my personal beliefs, but if you'd like to discuss yours, i'll call the chaplain for you."

    [color=#4b0082]ruby (catholic, if you really want to know)
    thank you ruby for your response.

    i, too, won't go far into a conversation with my patients once i answer their questions they present to me regarding what my faith is. if they want to continue to talk about it, i redirect their questions to perhaps what their concerns are while they are hospitalized. i ask them if they would like to see one of our hospital chaplains, or try and narrow down pat answers for them. now, i've had a few patients in my nursing years that on occasion would converse with them. those patients were usually associated with my own faith, and i had time to listen to them share something personal about how their faith was meaningful to them, but i don't remember having a patient who insisted on talking about my faith or their faith everytime i entered their room. i haven't had too many patients that were annoying. those who were annoying to care for were annoying for reasons that had nothing to do with "religion".
  12. by   iadoregon
    i do, however, agree for example, if someone is treating you with compassion, you can't really tell if that person is a christian or an atheist.

    -dan[/quote]
    that has to be one of the most intelligent things ever said. i am going to write that one down and memorize it. outstanding! :yeahthat: :bowingpur
  13. by   danu3
    Quote from ruby vee

    [color=#4b0082]ruby (catholic, if you really want to know)
    since you are catholic, you can potentially answer "yes, i am a christian". or where you are catholic is not consider to be christian?

    -dan

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