+Nursing caps - page 2

Was just wondering,,,,,how many nurses still wear their caps? I work with a very dedicated, yet at times anal nurse, and even though we work in a very small LTC facility, she still wears her nursing... Read More

  1. by   CT Pixie
    My first job as a CNA (mid 80's) was in an "old school" type nursing home where the DON was in her 60's and the Assistant DON also in her 60's so they were new nurses in the mid 40's. Anyway, in this LTC, EVERYONE on the nursing staff wore white. White pants/skirts, white tops, white or navy blue cardigan, white shoes, white hose! And the nurses wore their caps, and were never refered to by their first names! It was Miss Smith or Mrs Jones..however, we (the CNA;s) were called by our first names. I loved that place! I left when I went to school in the early 90's and they STILL were wearing the head to toe white AND CAPS! (AND you could tell if the nurse were an RN or LPN by the stripe(s) on her cap. Of course now I cannot remember if the run had one stripe or two.

    I miss seeing a nurse in all white with the caps. Although I hated being in all white! Its tough now, you don't know if you are talking with an aide, a nurse, housekeeping, dietary..at least with the caps you KNEW you were speaking with a real nurse!
  2. by   Sue Damonas
    I will never wear a cap. To me only french maids wear caps. It's too demeaning to me.
  3. by   Creamsoda
    If i ever seen anyone wearing one, I would think that they are one of those nurses who have difficulty with change. "well we have always done it this way" well guess what, times change, procedures change, traditions change. They are the ones that have difficulty with anything thats different. I remember working on one unit recently and I hated how they made the bed. The would always put a flannel sheet under the patient. Now most of the patients in the CCU were ambulating, but occasionally there were vented, unresponsive patients. Talk about a pain in the butt trying to boost the patints. The patients stuck to the flanel. When I asked the older nurses why they insisted on doing the bed like this, they couldnt give me a good reason why, and im sure it was mainly because thats how they did it on this unit for the past 20 years.
    I think its quite silly to wear those hats. Also the fact that they are a bacterias dream home!
  4. by   lauralassie
    I have one that looks like batting fabric in coat lining. I was always jelous of Miami of Ohio's caps and Navy nurses caps. They always looked so nice. I'm not sure where my cap is at this point. They were a pain to wear. Always catching on things, pain to keep stiff and clean. But, they were a way to define nurses. I think nurses should be defined = not by caps per say but white, lab coats with names embossed on etc... It always amazes me how nurses come to work. Soooo wrinkeled and messed. I also love to look at old pictures of nurses in the 18oo's. The history is so interesting. Nurses in Scotland had large caps that looked like the flying nun.
    We've come a long way baby!
    Last edit by lauralassie on Feb 9, '07
  5. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from Cher1983
    If i ever seen anyone wearing one, I would think that they are one of those nurses who have difficulty with change. "well we have always done it this way" well guess what, times change, procedures change, traditions change. They are the ones that have difficulty with anything thats different. I remember working on one unit recently and I hated how they made the bed. The would always put a flannel sheet under the patient. Now most of the patients in the CCU were ambulating, but occasionally there were vented, unresponsive patients. Talk about a pain in the butt trying to boost the patints. The patients stuck to the flanel. When I asked the older nurses why they insisted on doing the bed like this, they couldnt give me a good reason why, and im sure it was mainly because thats how they did it on this unit for the past 20 years.
    I think its quite silly to wear those hats. Also the fact that they are a bacterias dream home!
    And then you would be unfairly judging someone based on that person wearing a cap. Nice.

    Yet another slam at older nurses. It gets tiresome.
  6. by   SCRN1
    The only time I wore mine was for my graduation picture and then for the pinning ceremony.

    I will not wear one to work. For one reason, I also wonder how many germs they collect.
  7. by   charebec65
    I must admit that in PN school I was excited to learn that we did not have to wear hats. The white uniforms were pretty at first but eventually you end up with stains from unknown origins that just won't come out and like other white articles of clothing, start greying out after washing the same 3 uniforms for a year.

    I'm finishing my last prereq for the LPN to RN transition program at a local college. I love the maroon uniforms. (I think a white lab coat)...and no hat...
  8. by   Ynemec
    I work at a LTC that enforces white uniforms, caps etc. We all look dingy and the whites are not opaque, so your underclothes always show. God help you if you're a woman and you're at that time of the month. The caps cause balding from the pins we have to use to keep them on, they cause headaches, and with oral, nasal, and lung colonized MRSA EVERYWHERE, you wonder if you're dragging infection from patient to patient. The whole situation just STINKS.
  9. by   elkpark
    I've worked in psych most of my career and so have mostly worn street clothes -- but, when I'm in a "uniform" situation, I wear real "whites" (not scrubs) and my cap.

    The hospital in which my diploma school was based required caps into the mid-'80s (they only made them optional when a group of nurses working there threatened a class action lawsuit, which the board of trustees realized they'd lose).
  10. by   sharlynn
    Quote from charebec65
    I must admit that in PN school I was excited to learn that we did not have to wear hats. The white uniforms were pretty at first but eventually you end up with stains from unknown origins that just won't come out and like other white articles of clothing, start greying out after washing the same 3 uniforms for a year.
    I was required to wear white for many years and never had a problem with stains or dinginess. Pre-treating and washing whites only work wonders!
  11. by   abbysmom
    so funny that i would come across this tonight. i just read a nursing article about physician/nurse relations that started with an anecdote about a nursing professor addressing her new students. she described the nursing cap as one that marked knowledge, professionalism, and subservience to the knowledge and wisdom of doctors... and then she said "that is why we no longer use them". i never thought of them that way, but now i look back and think they could be construed as such. hats/caps/hairnets are a way of pulling back hair, implying less cleanliness, or at least a way to provide more cleanliness. i applaud the lack of caps in use--they are bothersome and symbolic at this point, and possible agents of disease transmission. good riddance.
  12. by   prmenrs
    Caps are just one of those things whose time has expired. I have mine; they're on the top shelf in the closet. I'll probably request they be cremated w/me.

    As for work? Caps + hair + open warmer = Code Red.
  13. by   GadgetRN71
    I think the old uniforms looked nice, especially those cool capes that some of them wore! The only caps I never liked the look of were the ones that looked like cupcakes.

    I wear scrubs provided by the hospital, but I'm all for nurses looking neat and clean and professional. I hate the dragon lady fingernails-the really long ones just look silly, IMO. I have seen some nurses that look like they just rolled out of bed and out the door.

    Ultimately, I think I'm torn. On the one hand we are all adults and I hate the idea that we have to be told what we can and can't wear, like children. But, some patients do get confused because everyone does kind of look alike.

    I'm not sure I buy the argument that nurses got all this respect just for wearing white, though. From some patients, maybe, but ceratinly not from doctors. An older nurse told me that they had to give up their seat to the doctor and one guy used to snap his fingers and expect that the nurse would answer to that.

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