“Breast Is Best”: A Mantra to Promote Infant Health? or Stigmatizing Adage to Guilt Moms - page 13

Before I go too far into this article, and risk being stoned to death by the maternal-child nurses, lactation consultants, and midwives out there, I would like to make a few critical points. ... Read More

  1. by   klone
    Oh, I have so many things to say about this!! Don't have a ton of time right now, but wanted to mention that one of the things that HUGELY drew me to the hospital where I work now is that they have a comprehensive case management program for pregnant/new moms, which includes postpartum home visits within a day or two after hospital discharge for all women in the program (which is 90+% of all the women who deliver). What I would love to see is a program like this for ALL hospitals, in all communities. I would also like to see the postpartum home visits expanded to include another visit at a week, and/or two weeks.

    One of the things the nurses do, standard, at these visits, is a bilirubin check. They've caught SO many in-crisis breastfeeding pairs through this program, intervened early to help get breastfeeding onto a better path, and yes, even readmitted babies who required phototherapy.
  2. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from klone
    Oh, I have so many things to say about this!! Don't have a ton of time right now, but wanted to mention that one of the things that HUGELY drew me to the hospital where I work now is that they have a comprehensive case management program for pregnant/new moms, which includes postpartum home visits within a day or two after hospital discharge for all women in the program (which is 90+% of all the women who deliver). What I would love to see is a program like this for ALL hospitals, in all communities. I would also like to see the postpartum home visits expanded to include another visit at a week, and/or two weeks.

    One of the things the nurses do, standard, at these visits, is a bilirubin check. They've caught SO many in-crisis breastfeeding pairs through this program, intervened early to help get breastfeeding onto a better path, and yes, even readmitted babies who required phototherapy.

    Wish I could give this post more than one like. I think for as advanced as the U.S. is in medicine we are really dropping the ball when it comes to perinatal/postnatal care. The Europeans do it so much better.
  3. by   sanakruz
    Breast is best.

    Of course, use a pump! Who is stopping you?

    Call La Leche league. (Talk to other moms.) DOZENS of resources available.

    No, we havent gone overboard. Breast is best.
  4. by   jodyangel
    Klone,

    Tell us more about this. HOW did this program get started and where does the funding come from?

    ...comprehensive case management program for pregnant/new moms, which includes postpartum home visits within a day or two after hospital discharge for all women in the program (which is 90+% of all the women who deliver).
  5. by   klone
    Quote from jodyangel
    Klone,

    Tell us more about this. HOW did this program get started and where does the funding come from?

    ...comprehensive case management program for pregnant/new moms, which includes postpartum home visits within a day or two after hospital discharge for all women in the program (which is 90+% of all the women who deliver).
    Funny you should ask, because this is currently my VERY FAVORITE TOPIC and I could chat anyone up about it for days if they ask! The program has been in our rural community (population 20,000) for over 25 years. We have a 100% referral rate from the OB care providers, and 100% buy-in from the community's pediatricians. Over 90% of the women who deliver at our hospital has at least one visit from our OB case managers, and most of the women have multiple visits, which take place prenatally in the home and on the unit, various formal education classes that are free, visits while inpatient after delivery (all of our maternity case managers are also IBCLCs), and postpartum home visits, as well as follow-up check-in calls for as long as the mother wants.

    The funding comes from the hospital - it's considered a "community benefits" program. It does not earn revenue of any kind. As a result, we have a shoestring budget and have to do lots with little. Luckily, the nurses who work in the program are used to that and are very fiscally minded.

    What's REALLY cool is that a large Oregon non-profit approached us this past summer because they recognize that the program is so incredibly awesome and they've given us a sizeable grant and have hired a researcher to spend the next year with us to document what we do, and this will be published, in order to provide a blueprint of the program for other communities that wish to replicate the program. SO SO EXCITED!!

close