Patients who "cheat" and drive home - page 3

I work at an endoscopy center (and a freestanding surgery center). A few times, we've had patients lie to us about how they are getting home, and they've ended up returning to their cars, and driving home. Of course we find this... Read More

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    The department can either change their holding/discharge procedures and/or have the patient sign a document that they will be transported by "xxxx" person and then have that person present and sign the document at discharge. The idea would be similar to that when mothers are being discharged with their newborns.

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    Really, what's wrong with taking a cab (if you can get one).
    redhead_NURSE98! and llg like this.
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    I have worked in an endoscopy clinic and for a dental surgeon, and the the person who will be driving the the patient home must come into the clinic so we can give them instructions and so we can verify that the patient will not be driving. If the patient did not make arrangements to have someone else drive them home then the procedure will be cancelled. We never let the patients walk out of the clinic alone.

    Ottawa, Canada
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    Quote from Mulan
    Really, what's wrong with taking a cab (if you can get one).
    Some areas do not have cab or any other public transportation. For this reason I had no choice but to walk 1.5 miles after oral surgery. My friend who was to take me home had to go to work at a certain time. Of course since I'm a proponent of Murphy's Law, theprocedure was started two hours later then scheduled.

    Fuzzy
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    I live in a rural area - no cabs, no buses, etc.. I too have driven myself home after dental surgery. I do have adult children and a husband that lives 170 miles away but to ask them to take time off work is inconvenient and I just wouldn't do it. If I need endoscopy (crossed fingers never to need), I will do it w/o sedation.
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    Quote from Fuzzy
    Some areas do not have cab or any other public transportation. For this reason I had no choice but to walk 1.5 miles after oral surgery. My friend who was to take me home had to go to work at a certain time. Of course since I'm a proponent of Murphy's Law, theprocedure was started two hours later then scheduled.

    Fuzzy
    That question wasn't directed to you.
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    How about providing return transport home via an ambulance or service - at an additional cost to those patients who have no one to take them home? As medical professionals and service, customer-centric and caring persons, this would be the only solution - ensuring that before they are handed over, that they are fully recovered and able to get themselves out of the transport and into their home.
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    SORRY - MY COMMENT SHOULD READ:

    How about providing return transport home via an ambulance or TAXI service - at an additional cost to those patients who have no one to take them home? As medical professionals and service, customer-centric and caring persons, this would be the only solution - ensuring that before they are handed over, that they are fully recovered and able to get themselves out of the transport and into their home.
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    Our policies at my endoscopy center (ASC) make it a non-issue, really.

    The patient knows well in advance of the requirement for a driver home. They are reminded the day before. Upon arrival at our facility, the admission nurse will inquire as to who the driver is, where they are, etc. MOST of the time, the driver is either standing there with them when this question is asked, or a name and phone number is provided at that time.

    Our facility has people in and out in less than two hours, so it's typically not a problem for our patients.

    A taxi home is fine, IF they are accompanied by a responsible adult to get them home. Our anesthesiologists insist on that: a taxi cannot just drop you at the curb and buzz away.

    In the last year, I can point to exactly two cases in which a patient lied....they had provided a name and phone number, and upon calling the number it was determined to be a cab company. In both those cases, the patient had already undergone the procedure and therefore we were stuck: we couldn't KEEP them, but we also couldn't safely DISCHARGE them. Anesthesia threw a fit, and in each case, we got the cab driver to sign the discharge form that they WOULD be taking responsibility for that patient. Obviously, no one can know what happened when they drove away, but legally our butts were covered. And yes, healthcare in these situations is about legalities; we weren't really afraid our patients would be in danger, but LEGALLY there was a hook to be caught on.

    As for the other suggestions: no one would be willing to pay for a medical transport when they can get a friend/relative/co-worker for free, and that's the HUGE majority of our patient demographic. I realize it's not easy for everyone, but honestly, out of thousands of cases a year, they just manage to do it. Those TWO did not. And if someone does cancel because they have no ride, or WE cancel them for that reason, they FIND a ride and reschedule. No problem.
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    Quote from traumaRUs
    I live in a rural area - no cabs, no buses, etc.. I too have driven myself home after dental surgery. I do have adult children and a husband that lives 170 miles away but to ask them to take time off work is inconvenient and I just wouldn't do it. If I need endoscopy (crossed fingers never to need), I will do it w/o sedation.
    Ah, but everyone should be screened via colonoscopy after age 50, and earlier with a family history of GI issues. I think there's a scope in your future...
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.


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