Endoscopy RN...would you recommend it? - page 2

Hi, I just graduated nursing school and am trying to figure out what I want to do. Does anyone have any insite on Endoscopy Nursing? What exactly do they do? Thanks!!... Read More

  1. 0
    Hello CFITZRN,

    I am currently a med-surg nurse with 6 months of experience. I was wondering what experience you recommend having before becoming a GI nurse or what tips you have for increasing my chances of becoming hired. I am excited to become a GI nurse because there are many opportunities in my area. However, I am discouraged since I fear that I don't have enough experience compared to other candidates applying for the position. I appreciate your help and advice!!

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  2. 2
    Hi Dreaming,

    With 6 months of med-surg, you are more than qualified to do Endo work. It would help a lot if you've done your fair share of IV starts and enemas (but any RN should be able to do enemas - easy peazy). Your assessment skills should be good, good instincts, good attention to pt status. You are far more qualified than I was when I started and I picked it up quickly. I went through ACLS within a few months of starting but honestly, if any of our patients crash or show any signs of distress, the CRNAs or Anesthesiologist take over immediately. I have found that having a really positive attitude and excellent people skills are more important in this position than huge nursing experience. With your basic foundation in med-surg, you will learn quickly what you need to know. I highly encourage you to go for it if you feel called. I wish you the best! Post and let me know what you decide.

    OH! I forgot one of the most important details. My Clinical Manager told me that one of the best parts of my cover letter - the one thing that really stood out and got his attention - was this line: "I am a team player and have no interest in intra-office drama or politics." He said he knew he could train me, but you can't really force a person to refuse to play the drama game and he had enough of that. haha



    Quote from dreamingRN
    Hello CFITZRN,

    I am currently a med-surg nurse with 6 months of experience. I was wondering what experience you recommend having before becoming a GI nurse or what tips you have for increasing my chances of becoming hired. I am excited to become a GI nurse because there are many opportunities in my area. However, I am discouraged since I fear that I don't have enough experience compared to other candidates applying for the position. I appreciate your help and advice!!
    EndoRN14 and dreamingRN like this.
  3. 0
    Hello CFITZRN,

    Thank you for the speedy reply! You made my day. I am keeping you updated on my progress. Apparently, when I called the hospital today, they filled that position in the GI lab.... It broke my heart. However, I did apply for an outpatient endoscopy position, but I doubt I would get a response. Ideally,I preferred the first position because it was in the hospital, but I will keep my fingers crossed and hope that something else comes up in the area. I think I should tell you the whole story as to my interest in GI nursing if you don't mind.

    I will start off here. I actually started at the hospital I work at in Dec. 2009, so that is why I am counting the experience I have as 6 months. My unit is extremely stressful and my coworkers are not supportive. Therefore, I would like to consider GI nursing because it is specialized and I feel I can learn more skills and do well in my job. Sorry to vent...but I hope this sheds a bit more light into how much I am invested into becoming a good GI nurse. Any other insight?
  4. 0
    I'm a 2 year old nurse. I have predominantly worked Med/Surg with tele up to this point. However, I am looking into other areas of nursing consequent to really bad aching feet from 12 hour shifts and the physical weardown in Med/Surg. I'm 55 and I want to try to conserve my musculoskeltal health. Endoscopy sounds really interesting. What kind of possibilities are there (big possibilties or little possibilities) for less than 12 hour shifts, what kind of on the job "training or preceptorship" is the norm for this type of job, and what does a person have to do to get top range salaries in this area? Certfications, etc...

    Does anyone know how to transition from Med/Surg into this field?How's about a good research link for this area? I went on the National Assoc. of Endoscopy nurses site but I did not find any clear information on how to transition, education, etc. I curently have a BSN. I was doing to get my Cert. in Med/Surg- but if I can transtion into Endoscopy-might do that instead. MY FEET ARE KILLING ME FROM 12-hour days!

    Thanks in advance everybody!
  5. 0
    How easy is it for a new grad to apply for endo nursing? And how is the salary compared to other specialties? Are the shifts flexible? And can I expertise my knowledge in a wide range or just endoscopy? Sorry I ask too much
  6. 0
    How easy is it for a new grad to apply for endo nursing? And how is the salary compared to other specialties? Are the shifts flexible? And can I expertise my knowledge in a wide range or just endoscopy? Sorry I ask too much

    The facility I work at hires new grads. The manager likes new grads so she can train them the way she likes. There is a short training period for each area - maybe 2-3 weeks.
    We work only days M - F Usual schedule is 7-3:30 no nights, weekends or holidays.
    You need good assessment skills. You have to monitor your sedation with each patient as there is not a set does in moderate sedation. You need to like to be busy because you are on the go all day. We rarely have any down time.

    In our facility the RNs provide conscious sedation Some facilities use diprovan, which at least in California, must be administered by the physician.

    The nursing staff rotates between, admission, pre-procedure, procedure and post procedure.
    Salary is commensurate with the hospitals in the area.
  7. 0
    Quote from shari3909
    how easy is it for a new grad to apply for endo nursing? and how is the salary compared to other specialties? are the shifts flexible? and can i expertise my knowledge in a wide range or just endoscopy? sorry i ask too much

    the facility i work at hires new grads. the manager likes new grads so she can train them the way she likes. there is a short training period for each area - maybe 2-3 weeks.
    we work only days m - f usual schedule is 7-3:30 no nights, weekends or holidays.
    you need good assessment skills. you have to monitor your sedation with each patient as there is not a set does in moderate sedation. you need to like to be busy because you are on the go all day. we rarely have any down time.

    in our facility the rns provide conscious sedation some facilities use diprovan, which at least in california, must be administered by the physician.

    the nursing staff rotates between, admission, pre-procedure, procedure and post procedure.
    salary is commensurate with the hospitals in the area.
    you don't utilize crnas in california?
  8. 0
    I am enjoying this thread. I have worked as an RN in a med-surg float pool for the past 9 months. Before that, I worked in psychiatry/mental health for 2 years. I'm realizing I need a change from the inpatient setting, so I just applied for an endoscopy position. I have an interview next week. I am both excited and anxious. I hope I'm making a good choice!


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