Endo ASC RN, interviewing for two hospital GI Labs

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    I'm an RN with one year of med-surg experience, followed by almost two years of experience in an Endoscopy ASC. I'm very excited that I may have the opportunity to transition into a GI lab at a hospital because I really enjoy GI, and I'm excited to delve into all of disorders and treatments that the GI specialty deals with, far beyond my small outpatient experience. I feel ready to move on and really expand my knowledge and skills, well aware of the stress that will come hand in hand with all of the new equipment and procedures to learn.

    I'm currently in the process of interviewing for two GI labs at different local hospitals. One has better patient satisfaction reviews. Physician reputations are equally outstanding at both institutions. There are small differences in the amount of call and weekends (my lifestyle does not present an issue for call schedules). No difference in procedures performed. Techs and RN in room for exams, certifications necessary for their proc RNs are similar. Both use general anesthesia as well as conscious sedation. Both seem to really value their nurses.

    I have a working interview followed by nurse panel interview at one institution tomorrow, and my first interview with the nurse manager at the other hospital later in the day. I'm trying to make sure I ask all pertinent questions but it's hard to know what I don't yet know, since I have so minimal exposure to a hospital GI lab.

    I'd really, really appreciate feedback from experienced hospital GI nurses as to what kinds of things I should have on my radar to observe for during my time shadowing on the unit and/or ask during my interviews tomorrow. I’m trying not to be scared off by nurses who used to work in a GI lab at a hospital and say that they left because it was “just too stressful”. I think I will learn a lot and strive in this new environment. I'm also confident that the working interview will give me more insight.

    I’ve got a list of questions so far but would appreciate feedback from those who have worked in hospital GI labs as to what they would be asking or would want to know in considering these positions. Thank you very much in advance.
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  3. 3 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Quote from mcr245
    I'm an RN with one year of med-surg experience, followed by almost two years of experience in an Endoscopy ASC. I'm very excited that I may have the opportunity to transition into a GI lab at a hospital because I really enjoy GI, and I'm excited to delve into all of disorders and treatments that the GI specialty deals with, far beyond my small outpatient experience. I feel ready to move on and really expand my knowledge and skills, well aware of the stress that will come hand in hand with all of the new equipment and procedures to learn.

    I'm currently in the process of interviewing for two GI labs at different local hospitals. One has better patient satisfaction reviews. Physician reputations are equally outstanding at both institutions. There are small differences in the amount of call and weekends (my lifestyle does not present an issue for call schedules). No difference in procedures performed. Techs and RN in room for exams, certifications necessary for their proc RNs are similar. Both use general anesthesia as well as conscious sedation. Both seem to really value their nurses.

    I have a working interview followed by nurse panel interview at one institution tomorrow, and my first interview with the nurse manager at the other hospital later in the day. I'm trying to make sure I ask all pertinent questions but it's hard to know what I don't yet know, since I have so minimal exposure to a hospital GI lab.

    I'd really, really appreciate feedback from experienced hospital GI nurses as to what kinds of things I should have on my radar to observe for during my time shadowing on the unit and/or ask during my interviews tomorrow. I’m trying not to be scared off by nurses who used to work in a GI lab at a hospital and say that they left because it was “just too stressful”. I think I will learn a lot and strive in this new environment. I'm also confident that the working interview will give me more insight.

    I’ve got a list of questions so far but would appreciate feedback from those who have worked in hospital GI labs as to what they would be asking or would want to know in considering these positions. Thank you very much in advance.
    Since you seem interested in long term career growth, maybe you could ask questions of the staff regarding their level of involvement in the GI department. These questions could give you some good insight to how your career may start and continue to grow there or not:

    -Do the staff there participate in GI-related continuing education?
    -Are you encouraged to attend GI conferences?
    -Is it possible develop GI-related projects [i.e. research project] in addition to the basic functions of the job?
    -Is your job limited strictly to the procedure aspect of GI or can you also float to the clinic if you need more variety?

    A follow up question if those answers are "yes" may be "when?".. Do they allow you administrative day to do those activities.. or do you squeeze the in between cases? etc. The current staff should be able to answer these questions.

    Regarding your concern about hospital GI being stressful: I would see if anesthesia [MD, CRNA] do the anesthesia, the GI doctors do it or if the RNs do it. This responsibility could be the most stressful part if the RNs are responsible for administering sedation if you are not experienced, in my opinion!

    Hope this helped. good luck!
  5. 0
    Thanks linguiine! The continuing education is very important, and I've already investigated these actually. That's excellent advice. And I'm glad to hear that the sedation is one of the most stressful parts of this job; where I currently work both MD and RN administer the conscious sedation so I do have some experience. I am curious to know approx what percentage of their patients are done under general anesthesia. Excellent idea asking about research opportunities! Thank you so much.
  6. 0
    Hi,
    I've worked GI in a hospital setting for several years. Here are a few tips.

    1) Assess your patient...even though a MD is willing to perform a procedure EGD, colonoscopy or ERCP on the pt, if they "look" like they are too sick (i.e. O2 sats are below 92, or they are congested, or struggling to breath, any change in condition, etc...) YOU are the one to say something and be the gatekeeper to their safety. They may need to cancel the procedure or have an anesthesiologist who could provide more "intensive care."

    2) IV fluids...always have them readily available if a pt does not have a running IV. Hypotension is a frequent malady and IVF's will be needed!

    3) Have your emergency drugs readily available...know signs of vaso-vagal response (drop in heart rate/hypotension/decreased LOC)

    4) It seems basic, but always check the consent over completely...all signatures dates and times. Don't feel rushed by anyone. You are the one that will ultimately be responsible for any mishap on the consent.



    There's lots more to it, but those are very important aspects that came to me as they are highlights that can cause you real grief if they are not tended to!...good luck...you sound very aware and I'm sure you will do absolutely great!


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