On Call SANE 24/7

  1. Hi there,

    I had been interested in being a SANE since I worked at a doctor's office. We have very specific protocol when addressing a patient who may have been involved in a violent incident. As I was doing research on SANE organizations, it became clear that a SANE is on-call 24/7 and should be ready to go at a moment's notice, at least this is what I took away from the literature I read.

    If you are on call 24/7, are SANEs at a clinic? I thought I saw stories of SANEs who got paged while at home - does this happen often or does it depend on other factors, such as working at a clinic or in a hospital? I read in a SANE manual that it can or at least should take a SANE to be with the victim within an hour - if you are at home are you expected to live nearby the clinic or hospital where the victim is usually taken?

    Any information is appreciated! Thanks!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   SoldierNurse22
    Usually, SANEs work at local ERs or urgent care centers. At clinics, I understand that they are on call during clinic hours. At ERs, they are on call 24/7. You respond to the facility at which you are employed.
  4. by   whealer
    Quote from SoldierNurse22
    Usually, SANEs work at local ERs or urgent care centers. At clinics, I understand that they are on call during clinic hours. At ERs, they are on call 24/7. You respond to the facility at which you are employed.
    Thank you! I was hoping that was the answer; but for some reason I saw literature that implied you would be at home when paged.

    Thanks again for the clarification
  5. by   SoldierNurse22
    You could be at home when paged if you work at a 24 hour facility...I don't really know of many clinics who use SANEs. Most clinics that would handle that kind of issue would probably refer a person to an ER.
  6. by   whealer
    I see what you mean! Do SANEs typically have shifts? I'm assuming it depends on how many are working at any given facility.
  7. by   SoldierNurse22
    As a SANE, you may work regular shifts at your place of employment just like any other floor nurse. For instance, a SANE could work the regular three 12 hour shifts per week in their ER, but then be on call on their time off as a SANE. Some places with multiple SANE certified RNs may rotate call so that one SANE isn't overstressed, but that depends on the location/number of SANEs.
  8. by   whealer
    This is great! Thank you so much @SoldierNurse22. Your responses have been extremely valuable! I'll do some more research with my local SANE organizations and see if I can get some volunteer experience too.

    You're awesome! Have a great day
  9. by   SoldierNurse22
    No problem! Best of luck to you.
  10. by   Pixie.RN
    Our SANE program has a calendar on which we sign up for call days, usually outside our regular ER shifts. Sometimes if there is no SANE to fill a call slot, SANEs who are at work in our ER will be designated on call. If a case comes in, we would call one of our managers to provided coverage in the ER while we do the case.
  11. by   whealer
    Quote from LunahRN
    Our SANE program has a calendar on which we sign up for call days, usually outside our regular ER shifts. Sometimes if there is no SANE to fill a call slot, SANEs who are at work in our ER will be designated on call. If a case comes in, we would call one of our managers to provided coverage in the ER while we do the case.
    So from what I understand - SANE cases are typically given to you when you are not on shift as an ER nurse? I'm assuming, then, that you would be home if you get pages to come in?
  12. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from whealer
    So from what I understand - SANE cases are typically given to you when you are not on shift as an ER nurse? I'm assuming, then, that you would be home if you get pages to come in?
    We get a phone call when there is a case and we are on call for that time period, yes. We have 90 minutes to respond, but we usually get there much sooner.
  13. by   whealer
    Quote from LunahRN
    We get a phone call when there is a case and we are on call for that time period, yes. We have 90 minutes to respond, but we usually get there much sooner.
    Ah good to know. I suppose my concern lies in not living close enough to the hospital where I would go to meet with the victim. Plus I don't have a car right now. Of course, these concerns are way in the future so I'll probably get my act together before then.
  14. by   danielleRN76
    We have 5 SANE nurses at my hospital. We have a calendar that we sign up for the days that we want to take call. We generally take 24 hour shifts, but sometimes take 12 hour shifts. We get paid $3 an hour to be on call. Being on call means being able to arrive to the ED within one hour, no ETOH, etc.. When we do get called in, we get paid time and a half even if not over 40 hours. We sign up for shifts that we are not already working, because when it comes to doing a SANE case, they want that to be our only focus. So, we get called in from home, from the mall, kids sporting events, etc.. It seems I only get called at dinner time or when my husband and I finally get the kids in bed to start watching a movie! I'm glad that I do it though. It feels good to be able to help someone through a crisis like this, especially when I know how hard it is for them to come forward and admit that something like this happened to them.

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