Foot care training - page 35

by kernow

I have been interested in starting a foot care service for some time now and after reading posts from LoisJean feel this is something I can do. I would like to start out by receiving some kind of training but cannot find anyone... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from guest***
    I spoke with 2 nurses from the certifiying board at the WOCN the other day and got some good news. This certification process is going to be open to Associate Degree nurses. I was first informed several years ago, when this was just an idea, that it would be for Bachelor Degree nurses and higher. Apparently they did a survey and found that most of the nurses doing foot care are A.S. nurses. So this is really good news. Now the LVN's/L.P.N.s need to go to their governing bodies and see how to get something going for them. It is very exciting to see this finally happening. It looks like I may be one of the nurses on the Exam Committee for this process and I will find out in a few weeks. I will keep you posted on any interesting developments. I do have one insight. I think that the use of dremel grinders is going to be very discouraged. I am going to advocate for the electric nail filing systems, something actually made with nails in mind and not craft projects. They are great tools, safe and with many different bits that can be sterilized.
    I have been a practicing foot care nurse (RN) for two years in British Columbia Canada and am currently using a Dremmel sander for filing thick nails. My colleagues and I are researching electric files/drills with integral vacuum systems. Can anyone advise on such podiatry drills which are sturdy and at the same time do not cost an arm and leg?
    lindarn likes this.
  2. 0
    hi all,
    i have been lurking on these foot care threads for 3 years!
    everytime i get ready to take a course and move closer to starting my own foot care business......i get a new nursing job!!!

    ...and chill for a while...

    'til the dissatisfaction comes back, and i start stalking the entrepreneural site again :d !!!

    i guess i have just been a little scared to take the plunge

    well... i'm baaackkkk... and this time, i am going to do it!

    so....to start with, i would like to ask if any of you have done cost comparison of the courses required by woc for their foot care certification.... which seem to be the most reasonable, cost wise?
    also, i would welcome any reviews of the courses if you have taken them!
    thanks!
  3. 0
    Hi Reenieday,

    I personally have put the idea back on the backburner. As an ADN(with 15 yrs experience), I still can't qualify to sit for most of the wound care courses and exams because they require BSNs. As if that wasn't reason enough to be peaved, it turns out that podiatrists in my area are highly defensive about their foot care turf. Maybe I just don't want it bad enough ....but I'm not wanting to waste my precious free time in legal battles with my local podiatrists. If you've found a way around that mess, please share it with me. It seems that our Canadian colleagues have a much sweeter deal than we in Pennsylvania.
  4. 0
    Quote from guest***
    I spoke with 2 nurses from the certifiying board at the WOCN the other day and got some good news. This certification process is going to be open to Associate Degree nurses. I was first informed several years ago, when this was just an idea, that it would be for Bachelor Degree nurses and higher. Apparently they did a survey and found that most of the nurses doing foot care are A.S. nurses. So this is really good news. Now the LVN's/L.P.N.s need to go to their governing bodies and see how to get something going for them. It is very exciting to see this finally happening. It looks like I may be one of the nurses on the Exam Committee for this process and I will find out in a few weeks. I will keep you posted on any interesting developments. I do have one insight. I think that the use of dremel grinders is going to be very discouraged. I am going to advocate for the electric nail filing systems, something actually made with nails in mind and not craft projects. They are great tools, safe and with many different bits that can be sterilized.
    OOPs ...I just read this post after my response.
    Please send the most recent insider WOCN info you may have. This may be a game changer for me.
  5. 2
    http://journals.lww.com/jwocnonline/...spx#-862270119

    This is the link to the WOCN journal which has an article in it on THE ROLE OF CERTIFIED FOOT AND NAIL CARE NURES IN THE PREVENTION OF LOWER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION. In this article, the use of the high speed podiatry file/drill is discussed and why it is superior to the dremel. In order for something to become standardized practice, or best practice, or gold standard, the topic must be published in a journal. It is obvious that a vac drill, made for feet, should be the standard of care. Now that an article is out ....
    there should be no more debate about this. The vac drill has been standard care in the UK and Europe for decades, but somehow the dremel replaced it in this country. The dremel is a terrible tool for foot care!!! Even though a good drill is expensive, it is worth every cent. I can see 4 pts an hour with my Helius 40 and charge $65 per client. Do the math... at $230 and hour, one can certainly afford this piece of equipment. I brought home $920 in 6 hours last week and did not even break a sweat. The drill does all the work if you know what burrs to use. Carbide for thick nails and calluses and diamond for the skin. Even though it is a bit bulky, I put my drill in a scrap booking case I got at Michael's Craft store. I carry an extension cord, so I do not have to worry about where I can plug it in. I also use a head lamp, magnifying glasses and sit on a stadium seat. I am fast, efficient and provide pain free foot care. I even have people fall asleep while I am working on them! I sent all my dremels to India over 8 years ago and regret the first year, when I knew about the better files but was too cheap to buy one.
    Jennay and lindarn like this.
  6. 0
    Hi
    I was wondering if you had decided if you would shar your salve recipe?
    I am in the process of getting my business set up and have a couple people who cannot afford expensive preparations for their feet and would like to offer a cheaper alternative.
    Thanks
    I look forward to hearing from you.
  7. 0
    I usually go to the hardware store and buy the better quality mask that carpenters use. I buy a box of 10 for $25. I am hoping to get a wholesale price from them too.
  8. 0
    The instruments have to be thoroughly cleaned before immersing in the chemosterilant.
    What I want to know is how to store these instruments once this process is done.
    I presume that the instruments have to be removed before adding more instrument in order to maintian the time required to sterilize.
  9. 0
    Quote from Smurfina
    Hello.....
    I live in British Columbia, and took the Vancouver Community college footcare course in 2008.
    I have levels one and two.
    I have been doing footcare for almost 2 years and am thoroughly enjoying it.., it is part of my pre-retirement plan!

    I work fulltime as an R.N., and have been doing the footcare part-time..last year I cut a 1000 toenails!!

    There is a lot to learn...and I continue to learn with each and every session.

    I am not sure where you are taking your course, but at the end of it they teach you about the business aspect
    of it...many of the do's and don't .....you HAVE to maintain your licensure as a nurse(be it LPN or R.N), you have to keep files and document each visit, keep the records for 8 years.
    I could go on and on......there is a woman on Vancouver Island(who also teaches the footcare course in Nanaimo), who has written a comprehensive guide to footcare.conditions, treatments etc.
    It is an excellent resource.
    Hope this is helpful......
    Hi
    Can you share this ladie's contact info as I would be interested in learning more. I did an advance foot care course and would like more training in dealing with padding etc for abnormally positioned digits and soft corns between toes.
  10. 0
    Quote from barefootnurse
    http://journals.lww.com/jwocnonline/...spx#-862270119

    This is the link to the WOCN journal which has an article in it on THE ROLE OF CERTIFIED FOOT AND NAIL CARE NURES IN THE PREVENTION OF LOWER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION. In this article, the use of the high speed podiatry file/drill is discussed and why it is superior to the dremel. In order for something to become standardized practice, or best practice, or gold standard, the topic must be published in a journal. It is obvious that a vac drill, made for feet, should be the standard of care. Now that an article is out ....
    there should be no more debate about this. The vac drill has been standard care in the UK and Europe for decades, but somehow the dremel replaced it in this country. The dremel is a terrible tool for foot care!!! Even though a good drill is expensive, it is worth every cent. I can see 4 pts an hour with my Helius 40 and charge $65 per client. Do the math... at $230 and hour, one can certainly afford this piece of equipment. I brought home $920 in 6 hours last week and did not even break a sweat. The drill does all the work if you know what burrs to use. Carbide for thick nails and calluses and diamond for the skin. Even though it is a bit bulky, I put my drill in a scrap booking case I got at Michael's Craft store. I carry an extension cord, so I do not have to worry about where I can plug it in. I also use a head lamp, magnifying glasses and sit on a stadium seat. I am fast, efficient and provide pain free foot care. I even have people fall asleep while I am working on them! I sent all my dremels to India over 8 years ago and regret the first year, when I knew about the better files but was too cheap to buy one.
    I tried to access the article but couldn't


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