Remington College of Nursing - Orlando - page 66

by TopCat1234 197,198 Views | 699 Comments

has anyone enrolled in the inaugural accelerated bsn class that started january 2009? what are your impressions so far? thank you, topcat... Read More


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    It all depends on where you want to go. I called georgetown university b/c thats where im interested in going for my nurse practitioner program and they will accept remingtons degree. I believe university of miami will recognize remingtons degree. You have to do your research and actually call the schools your interested in if they will accept your bsn degree. Do not go into it blindly, look past the bsn and research where you want to go for your advance nursing degree. See if they recognize remingtons bsn.
    Lesjoy333 likes this.
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    Does anyone in the current class (or pretty recent) have any advice for those of us starting in July? I know from the earlier posts that this is going to be a very intense and challenging program. What were your favorite (and least favorite) parts (classes, clinicals,etc.)? It's so expensive, but I do believe it will be worth it in the long run and I can't wait to get moving in my medical career
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    Hey all, I know the APG committee met on June 7th, wonder how long until the decisions are mailed out?:spin:
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    Quote from BSNer12
    Does anyone in the current class (or pretty recent) have any advice for those of us starting in July? I know from the earlier posts that this is going to be a very intense and challenging program. What were your favorite (and least favorite) parts (classes, clinicals,etc.)? It's so expensive, but I do believe it will be worth it in the long run and I can't wait to get moving in my medical career
    My first bit of advice is to refrain from using the term "medical". Medical refers to doctors, and Remington will take points of your papers for using that term. Doctors follow the medical model, and nurses follow the nursing model. You will have a "nursing" career or "healthcare" career, but not medical.
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    I know this sounds cliche, but I am starting to panic about the financial aspect to this program. I am starting this summer. Now, I KNOW the ABSN route is absolutely what I want to do; I know I will be a great nurse; I know I will do fantastic in school; I know I want to be a nurse without a doubt!!! I am just reading all these horror stories online of people saying they can't find work BECAUSE they went to RCON, and the money is not justified... etc etc. For those of you who attended or are attending: do you have any kind words? I'm concerned that if I passed up the opportunity and didn't get in elsewhere later - it's a year wasted where I could have been graduated! (yes I'm a "thinker" ...I know HAH).
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    Quote from orlandostdnt
    I am just reading all these horror stories online of people saying they can't find work BECAUSE they went to RCON, and the money is not justified... etc etc.
    Apologies for the wall of text...

    Your concerns are valid and I agree that the financial aspect is bad. I understand the frustration of not knowing what to expect and reading conflicting info all over the place. It is not true that people are not getting work because they went to RCON. People are not getting work out of state because no new grad nurses are getting work out of state (and possibly out of central florida). Don't deceive yourself, if you plan on graduating and moving back immediately to where ever you came from and getting a job as a hospital nurse, it won't happen unless you know someone there and even then, chances are slim. There is a nationwide experienced nursing shortage, but unless you have that experience, you will most likely not get hired at a hospital right away.

    If you are staying here in central florida post graduation, or you plan on staying here for at least a year to get some experience, you'll be fine. The hospitals here are hiring graduate nurses regularly and RCON students do get hired. Now, you may not get what you want right out of school, you may have to take what you can get to start, but after 6 months or a year, you can pretty much pick what you want to do. UCF, UF and USF students are dealing with the same conditions.

    All that being said, you are the most important factor in getting a job. If you slack off or are sloppy in your clinicals, don't count on getting a job here.

    If you have the time, finances, a current well paying job and good enough grades, apply to the state schools and see if you get in. There is a huge backlog and the entrance requirements are very competitive. At RCON, you're essentially paying extra to bypass all that. The staff has been great, my clinical instructors have been fantastic, and it'll all be done in a year. For me, it was worth it. For you, it may not be, that's for you to decide.
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    cdscmb-

    Thank you SO much for your timely and considerate response! I already applied to few state schools last winter (given at the end of the app cycle), and even with decent grades and 8+ years of hands-on patient experience in healthcare.... I was passed up. It was immensely discouraging. My main concern paralleling the financial aspect is exactly that : waiting another year, reapplying, and being re-rejected; when I could have been graduating.

    I have worked in most of the hospitals here on the space coast for the last 4+ years, and have a lot of friends in the hospitals. However, your reassuring words about in-state job placement is excellent to hear!

    Again, thank you for your reply!
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    Quote from cdscmb
    Apologies for the wall of text...

    Your concerns are valid and I agree that the financial aspect is bad. I understand the frustration of not knowing what to expect and reading conflicting info all over the place. It is not true that people are not getting work because they went to RCON. People are not getting work out of state because no new grad nurses are getting work out of state (and possibly out of central florida). Don't deceive yourself, if you plan on graduating and moving back immediately to where ever you came from and getting a job as a hospital nurse, it won't happen unless you know someone there and even then, chances are slim. There is a nationwide experienced nursing shortage, but unless you have that experience, you will most likely not get hired at a hospital right away.

    If you are staying here in central florida post graduation, or you plan on staying here for at least a year to get some experience, you'll be fine. The hospitals here are hiring graduate nurses regularly and RCON students do get hired. Now, you may not get what you want right out of school, you may have to take what you can get to start, but after 6 months or a year, you can pretty much pick what you want to do. UCF, UF and USF students are dealing with the same conditions.

    I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to disagree a bit with you. I was offered 2 out of state jobs, one of which was offered to me several weeks before I graduated and the other 2 weeks after I graduated. I didn't know anyone at those hospitals who helped me get those jobs. Also, I personally know of a student who will be graduating in July that has 2 interviews set up out of state. Additionally, I was offered a job in Titusville, FL, and the girls that I still keep in touch with from school all have jobs in the Orlando, Tampa, Ft. Lauderdale, and Gainsville areas. You getting a job is directly related to how much effort you put into it and how flexible you are. There are new grad RN programs at many hospitals in Florida and around the country that you can apply to. If you are sending out your resume but not hearing back from places, then call and ask why and possibly rewrite your resume. If you have several interviews and don't get any offers, then call and ask why. You may need to work on your interviewing skills. I moved to Florida for the sole purpose of getting my degree then moving back to my home state. If that is your goal, then it can happen.
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    Quote from flimfly
    I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to disagree a bit with you. I was offered 2 out of state jobs, one of which was offered to me several weeks before I graduated and the other 2 weeks after I graduated. I didn't know anyone at those hospitals who helped me get those jobs. Also, I personally know of a student who will be graduating in July that has 2 interviews set up out of state.
    It's not always good when someone disagrees with you, but in this case, that's great! I only spoke of info for people I know (and that was about a year ago), but if people are getting job offers out of state right out of school, that can only be good for students. I'm glad to hear it.
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    Okay, so remove "medical" from original my question and insert "nursing". For previous (or current) students, what was personally your favorite and least favorite parts of the program as far as the actual coursework? (Favorite and least favorite classes, clinicals, etc.) Any insight would be very helpful!


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