Is nursing in Florida (Miami) really as bad as it sounds? - page 2

by Laurenslovely

I am a nursing student in NYC, but I am originally from California. I will be graduating in May 2013 with my BSN. I visited my best friend living in Miami and I fell in LOVE with it (the culture and pace being in right in between... Read More


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    Take a look at NYCRN16's post in this thread about finding a nursing job as a new grad, especially if you're from out of state.
    NYCRN16 likes this.
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    I have lived around the Miami area since I was a little girl and now work as an LPN here, I can't imagine any professional reasons that I would wish to stay here longer than necessary. Pay is very low in comparison to other states, who do have their own issues such as a greater cost of living. Although the baby boomers in the theory would create a surplus of jobs, finding a job without knowing that certain "somebody," is very hard. The jobs that you do end up finding sometimes have indescribable patient ratios. Although no sales tax is always great, the BIPOLAR, and extremely HUMID weather is completely a deterrent for people who have been living here for years like me. For people who visit for a couple of days, weeks or even months, no amount of time other than a permanent residency which allow you to understand that all that warm and nice weather is a thing of the past. The weather changes quickly and extremely as of late making being outside unbearable at times. Traffic is traffic is traffic IS traffic. As long as you have a job that affords you being able to find other routes to get to work, you can and may get stuck in very slow moving traffic. Housing is on the rise, with rent prices much higher than before and although prices for homes have dropped, a gradual increase is starting to occur again especially with foreign investors who send their agents to just buy up properties without even a look. As a nurse who is looking to one day go further with her education and what not, I would not recommend Miami at all.
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    Quote from TheLiberation
    The jobs that you do end up finding sometimes have indescribable patient ratios. Although no sales tax is always great, the BIPOLAR, and extremely HUMID weather is completely a deterrent for people who have been living here for years like me.
    I hate to say this, but TheLiberation's post makes a lot of sense. I don't mind the weather though; I enjoy the subtropical (often tropical) climate here, though many find the humidity generally unbearable.

    We don't have an income tax, but we have a steep sales tax, which is especially painful if you're just trying to get by.

    But the patient ratios in a lot of places I don't know how it's legal, but I've come to understand that, as a society, we don't care much about the elderly. It seems that whatever social ills befall the U.S., they're amplified in South Florida.
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    Quote from Tragically Hip
    ...Unless you're a doctor, lawyer, international business person, or gangster, it's hard to make a career flourish here.
    The gangster part was funny....

    I agree with most posters, speaking Spanish is almost a must. I am new graduate and I speak English and Spanish; both fluently and I am competing with thousands that just recently graduated from several schools this past April with the same qualifications. It is difficult for new graduates to get a job as with recent laid offs, the hospitals tend to favor those with experience.

    I can tell you that one friend of my mine got hired at Cleveland with a starting pay of $24.00/hr with $4.00 differential if she works nights. Also, the drug testing they do also checks for nicotine and if you test positive they will not hire you, and you are also submitted to a physical where you have to lift a certain amount of pounds as well as push them.

    I suggest before you permanently move, and if you can afford to, come and spend some time here. If you can apply and get a job before moving will be ideal, because you might be hit with the harsh reality that you have given up what you have known all these years to move down here with not job prospects.

    You can also do what one classmate who did not speak Spanish - she moved to up north of Florida once she graduated, and applied at Shands, she got hired within one week. Apparently, there is not much of a Spanish community there.

    Good luck and if you make it here - Welcome to Miami and the traffic.
    PrincessO likes this.
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    You would be making a big mistake....I am also originally from California(been in Florida for 4 years), and lived in NY as well. I fell in love with Florida as well, but there is a big difference in working as a nurse here versus working as a nurse in California. You get worked like a dog here, there are no unions, most places require you to speak spanish or creole, and finding a job as a new grad is like hitting the lotto! I would not move anywhere as a new grad without securing a job first. Good Luck!
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    To those that are bashing Miami: Good job! I live in Hollywood which is basically Florida. I have no other choice but to live here until my partner and I finish RN school. I just got my LPN license and am searching for a part time job. Reading these responses only makes it seem that Miami is the worst place when it really isn't. It depends in your preferences on where you want to work, your experience, who's hiring, what type of nurse they want, etc. Traffic is at times horrendous especially early in the morning rush hour and afternoon/evening rush hour but like any city it has bad and good qualities. I'm a resident if Fl born and raised 22 years and I can't imagine not being in my discombobulated, bipolar state.
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    Quote from Butterfly6890
    To those that are bashing Miami: Good job! I live in Hollywood which is basically Florida. I have no other choice but to live here until my partner and I finish RN school. I just got my LPN license and am searching for a part time job. Reading these responses only makes it seem that Miami is the worst place when it really isn't. It depends in your preferences on where you want to work, your experience, who's hiring, what type of nurse they want, etc. Traffic is at times horrendous especially early in the morning rush hour and afternoon/evening rush hour but like any city it has bad and good qualities. I'm a resident if Fl born and raised 22 years and I can't imagine not being in my discombobulated, bipolar state.
    Some of us are not bashing Miami, or for that matter Florida. We are giving information on what has been asked. Just like we live in Florida and we would not think of living anywhere else, so to those who are coming from states that may fair better employment wise.
    There are approximately 13 nursing schools in Dade County and Broward, all graduating nurses twice a year, most are not looking to moving out of state, and are having a difficult time getting jobs. I am including myself in this group. At this point, is getting in the door for most of us, and most are not picky in which unit. I have to be honest, I have not compared the job market for LPNs, though I went to the job fair that was held at the Broward Convention Center 2 weeks ago, and most hospitals there were no longer hiring LPNs.
    The weather here is awesome for most, and diversity in culture is also the main attraction, but let us be clear, that being bilingual is important and the hourly rate is one of the lowest in the country. As far as I know, only Jackson Memorial Hospital has a union, and we in South Florida know the financial difficulties that hospital is having.
    My advise, is come and visit us, check it out, and most importantly, do not move down here without securing a job, so as to not be in the same position as some of us new graduates. Having said that, the job fair was great for those with experience, plenty of hospitals there were willing to hire those with at least 2 years of experience.
    Again, welcome to Florida
    VidaUrbana likes this.
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    I would most like recommed living in fort lauderdale than miami because miami , fort lauderdale is quieter and nicer there is a alot of hispanics in miami so therefore if your not bilingual its gonna be hard especially if u live in certain parts in miami I am a new grad nurse and its hard to find a job there so I had to move to orlando. the cost of living is less and pay is less if u live somewhere that pays more the cost of living is more so it works out to be the same thing. I think florida is better bc houses and apartments are nicer and u receive more quality for what u pay for, there are alot of retired people in florida therefore healthcare will progress.
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    I would most like recommed living in fort lauderdale than miami because miami , fort lauderdale is quieter and nicer there is a alot of hispanics in miami so therefore if your not bilingual its gonna be hard especially if u live in certain parts in miami I am a new grad nurse and its hard to find a job there so I had to move to orlando. the cost of living is less and pay is less if u live somewhere that pays more the cost of living is more so it works out to be the same thing. I think florida is better bc houses and apartments are nicer and u receive more quality for what u pay for, there are alot of retired people in florida therefore healthcare will progress.


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