Mental capacity of a nurse in question...

  1. I have been all over the FL-BON website & Nurse practice act and not getting anywhere, I know of a nurse who attempted suicide this week, not something she could hide from her workplace as that was the responding ER so it's out there for them to see, what are the ramifications of this on her license if any? I know personally that this was her 3rd try and it was more of a temper tantrum than a true attempt :angryfire however I'm pretty sure no one in her workplace knows that little detail, nor the details leading up to her tantrum, and that whenever she returns to work at the ER she'll allow them to think her husband is just that awful that she resorted to that which make me even more angier, I now consider her to be a permanent threat to herself as well as to her children but it's not my place to tell her husband what to do, so all we can do is sit back and watch her play games with his mind and the minds of their children :trout: but her husband is convinced that this one of those things that can just be brushed under the professional rug so to speak
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   caroladybelle
    Is she dangerous to patients or impaired in the care that she provides to patients?
  4. by   ZooMommyRN
    I don't work with her, but anyone who can attempt to kill themself 3 times is in my mind a danger to anyone around them
  5. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from ZooKeeper247
    I don't work with her, but anyone who can attempt to kill themself 3 times is in my mind a danger to anyone around them

    Then you would be eliminating a lot of very good compassionate nurses, MDs, and other HCWers out there.

    Just because someone is a danger to themselves does not mean that they are dangerous to others...yes they probably should be focusing on treating their own illness, but how are they likely to do so, with no job.

    And as someone that has tried to kill herself, I was never a danger to others and was fine at work. I am also familiar with plenty of people that were wonderful caregivers that did succeed at suicide...no one was ever aware of what went on off the job as far as depression. There are also plenty that have survived with therapy....therapy that they could have never gotten if axed from their job...or made to feel bad or unworthy of being a professional due to depression.

    Now, is this person endangering patients and is she impaired as a caregiver?

    Also, how much of here personal issues are you witness to? Not rumors from her spouse, but actually know for fact? If this was hushed up, and HIPAA was followed, how do you know so much...theoretical there should be no gossip even if the ER was involved in treatment? And is there already confidential intervention taking place?
  6. by   jmgrn65
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Then you would be eliminating a lot of very good compassionate nurses, MDs, and other HCWers out there.

    Just because someone is a danger to themselves does not mean that they are dangerous to others...yes they probably should be focusing on treating their own illness, but how are they likely to do so, with no job.

    And as someone that has tried to kill herself, I was never a danger to others and was fine at work. I am also familiar with plenty of people that were wonderful caregivers that did succeed at suicide...no one was ever aware of what went on off the job as far as depression. There are also plenty that have survived with therapy....therapy that they could have never gotten if axed from their job...or made to feel bad or unworthy of being a professional due to depression.

    Now, is this person endangering patients and is she impaired as a caregiver?

    Also, how much of here personal issues are you witness to? Not rumors from her spouse, but actually know for fact? If this was hushed up, and HIPAA was followed, how do you know so much...theoretical there should be no gossip even if the ER was involved in treatment? And is there already confidential intervention taking place?

    DITTO
    And I think the op needs to be educated in depression.
  7. by   ZooMommyRN
    I have been and she does this intentionally to "keep her husband in line" her words, it's a family member and her manipulation has worn out her welcome for me
  8. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from ZooKeeper247
    I have been and she does this intentionally to "keep her husband in line" her words, it's a family member and her manipulation has worn out her welcome for me
    Then your issue has more to do with her behavior towards her husband/family and not with any dangers posed to patients. This has nothing to do with an attempted suicide, but has to do with manipulative behavior. Therefore there is not really any way/legal reason to threaten her license.

    If the husband has issues with her behavior or worries about the care of the children it is HIS duty to do something about it. And if family/friends/fellow HCWers know factually about physical danger to the children that is not hearsay and that may hold water in court, they should and must intervene. Nurses are obligated to report cases of abuse.

    If this is a hearsay issue, or a "he said, she said" issue, or there is no apparent danger to the kids, there are very few things that an outsider can do.

    However, manipulative behavior only works, if others permit themselves to be manipulated. Which means the husband needs to step up to the plate, set some limits and hold to them...for the good of children and himself. If he chooses not to do this, he is permitting and abetting the behavior. A counselor can advise functional and helpful ways to do so.
  9. by   elkpark
    Unless you know specific information related to her being dangerous to patients, you have no business attempting to interfere with her license. Sounds like you have a personal involvement in this situation and this nurse has pushed your buttons. If you suspect that her children are being neglected or abused, then that info needs to be reported to DSS (or whatever they're called in your state). Otherwise, mind your own business. If the woman bugs you, stay away from her.
  10. by   UM Review RN
    Personally, I think you should mind your own business -- and this is outside the scope of your business.
  11. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from ZooKeeper247
    I have been and she does this intentionally to "keep her husband in line" her words, it's a family member and her manipulation has worn out her welcome for me
    A former co-worker of mine went through a really bad divorce-her husband reported her to the BON as being unsafe due to her "un-sound mind" The BON figured out quickly that he was the one with the "un-sound mind" You sound like you really have an axe to grind with this person.If you have evidence to show she is incompetent in her nursing skills then follow your chain of command and report her.If you don't then stay out of her personal life.Her husband is a big boy-if he wasn't getting something he needs out of their relationship he would leave.Any one of us can be as crazy as a loon (not diagnostically crazy-just your ordinary every day crazy) in our personal life but still be a good nurse...Be a professional-keep your personal feelings towards your co-workers OUT of your working relationships with them...Mind your own business.How would you feel if someone you know tried to get you fired or make you loose your license because they don't like you?
  12. by   Mulan
    I agree with the rest, mind your own business.

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