College question..LPN or RN??

  1. 0
    Hi All!

    I want to go back to school in the Fall and I am unsure on which path would be the best for me. As it stands now I am considering going for my LPN first.
    I am 31 yrs old and do have an AAS degree...not related to healthcare. Would it be in my best interest to go to school for my LPN or jump right into the RN program? My only road block may be the prereqs (since I have none of them complete for the RN admission) and there may also be a HUGE waiting list at the colleges here in Jacksonville for admission into any RN program from what I have heard from many others.
    Thank you in advance for any advice!
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  5. 0
    I went to LPN school first, then hated RN school because I felt like it was very redundant. However, I am glad that I got to work while in RN school. I had 3 children to support but, choices for LPN's are more limited. and I find that being a RN is much more marketable. Check out the college in Lake City????? It is not difficult at all to get into the schools in Fort Myers, and everyone is desperate for nurses, so I do not understand?? Good luck to you whichever you choose, but getting it over with will keep you from being bored later and also will keep you from feeling like you are doing the same work but being paid less.!!
  6. 0
    Originally posted by Marlajax
    Hi All!

    I want to go back to school in the Fall and I am unsure on which path would be the best for me. As it stands now I am considering going for my LPN first.
    I am 31 yrs old and do have an AAS degree...not related to healthcare. Would it be in my best interest to go to school for my LPN or jump right into the RN program? My only road block may be the prereqs (since I have none of them complete for the RN admission) and there may also be a HUGE waiting list at the colleges here in Jacksonville for admission into any RN program from what I have heard from many others.
    Thank you in advance for any advice!
    Hi: I teach in the LPN program at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville Fl. Many of our students come into the LPN program because 1. they don't have the prereqs done for the ASN programs, 2. they can work as an LPN while taking prereqs and make more money, 3. we have an LPN to RN Bridge program where after you graduate from SFCC and work as an LPN for 6 months (preferably in acute care), you can apply for the bridge program the next year and join the 2nd year RN students, thus completing your RN degree in 2 years (provided you have the prereqs done). The advantage of becoming an LPN first is that you can make more money while taking prereqs and while in the last year of the RN school. There are a number of LPN programs in the state. Go to the following website for further information: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/nursi..._consumer.html . Scroll down to the bottom and click on the "Registered and Practical Nurse Training Progarms". LPN programs start on page 3. When checking out the schools, ask what is their state board pass rate. this will tell you how good the school is. At Santa Fe Community College, last year (2003) our pass rate was 100%!! Now that dosn't happen every year, but we consistently have been in the 95% and up range. IN all programs, LPN and RN, there is usually a list. Program lengths vary from 10.5 months (ours) to 18 months. The shorter the program, the more intense it is. Having been in school is a plus for you as you already know study habits, etc. The age range for our current class is 21 - 54 years old. If you would lilke more information about the LPN program here at SFCC, go to our website www.sfcc.edu, click on the index, click on "N", click on "Nursing Progarms", click on "PN" for LPN program specifi information. Let me know if I can be of further assistance.
  7. 0
    Hi -
    Your choice will probably depend heavily on your current financial situation. I am not wealthy by any means, but I opted to go straight thru nursing school to RN - reasoning that I could devote more time and energies to my studies and my family if I did not have to throw simultaneous employment into the mix (and grateful I had the option; most do not). Some of our courses required so many hours (and odd ones at that) that I often marvelled how anyone could work outside the home and still fulfill course requirements. If you are one of the gifted ones that can work AND go to school, then more power to you. Unfortunately, I juggle it all.

    Also, most hospitals in my area of SC do not hire LPNs, and I did not want to work in a retirement home setting.

    Yet I know lots of folks who did their LPN first, then worked full-time while completing their RN (and did just fine!) -
    Hope these thoughts help - good luck with whatever choice you make!


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