what steps do I need to take to become a flight nurse??

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    I am just curious about what steps I need to take ot become a flight nurse?? I was an adavanced EMT for a number of years, then an LPN, and now a RN in the ER. I have had this silly dream of being a flight nurse ever since my ambulance days when I had to call my first helicopter?? Any advice?? Jennifer
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  4. 0
    Quote from nursejennie76
    I am just curious about what steps I need to take ot become a flight nurse?? I was an adavanced EMT for a number of years, then an LPN, and now a RN in the ER. I have had this silly dream of being a flight nurse ever since my ambulance days when I had to call my first helicopter?? Any advice?? Jennifer
    I too was wondering this. I know this sounds really stupid, but here goes anyway...i am terrified to DEATH of flying in an airplane, but I want to be a flight nurse one day go figure. When I did my clinicals last year, I had the chance to work with a flight crew at our hospital. Being there when they arrived, bringing the pt in, and being there when they took off was such an adrenaline rush. What they were doing was simply amazing and intense. For some odd reason I'm not afraid of going up in a chopper, but ABSOLUTELY REFUSE to get on an airplane. My dear hubby says I'm just warped that way...hmmmm
  5. 0
    Most programs require or prefer five years of clinical experience, ER and ICU.
    Depending on whether the company does only inter-hospital transfers or trauma scene flights will offer more specifics to the type of training that they want and also which state. Some require a combination RN/EMT-P rating, others just the RN. And as many letters as possible after your name.....
  6. 0
    depends on the company you fly for. Of course...all companies would like super nurses with a ton of critical thinking background experience such as ICU. But some will take just ER experience. The local company where I live actually asked me to fly for them (which I did for exactly one year). I was terribly honored. I had NO ICU experience. No High level trauma experience. But what they said I DID have that attracted them to me was the ability to make a decision. They did require that all nurses were ACLS, PALS, NRP and ATLS certified. I was acutely aware that every time I took a person under my care that they depended upon me and my skills. It put me totally at another level and for this I will always be in their debt. This was a rotor company with about 50% scene calls. I would suggest checking the requirements of the companies around where you live and putting the word out that you are interested. Good luck. Flying should be for those who aspire to great heights.

    P.S. A rotor feels a lot like riding in a car....unless you have weather.
  7. 0
    Become a paramedic.

    Most places around here require the RN/EMT-P to be a flight nurse. It has to do with the scene flights and nurses not being in the EMS laws at all!

    Chip
  8. 0
    Quote from chip193
    Become a paramedic.

    Most places around here require the RN/EMT-P to be a flight nurse. It has to do with the scene flights and nurses not being in the EMS laws at all!

    Chip
    Depends on where you live...we have PHRN's aka Health Providers...who function as equals to paramedics on the street...and can work in flight service as a nurse without having to do the full paramedic course...its a much more abbreviated course...
  9. 0
    First off I am not a flight nurse....merely another wannabe. Wat I have been told (from several flight nurses) is the kind of classic path is as follows....

    -approx 5 years of nursing experience split between ICU and ED. ICU for the critical thinking and exposure to those super sick patients. ED for volume, speed, trauma, getting good at assessments, triage, and physical skills. For the ED, I've heard Level 1 experience is best (for obvious reasons). For ICU, I have heard various opinions about which one is best and a pretty sound rationale for all of them. I would guess that whatever kind of unit it is, you would want it to have the highest possible acuity and exposure to different patients. I have also been told that getting some peds exp is very helpful.

    -certifications. CCRN and CEN certs are very helpful in getting a job and you learn a ton while studying for them.

    -courses. Obviously you have to have ACLS and PALS. Some programs require NRP. Most will put you through an ATLS(advanced trauma life support) audit or TNATC (transport nurse advanced trauma course) once you start working. Other courses that I have been told are helpful are TNCC (Trauma nursing core course) and ENPC (Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course....which you prob already have from working in the ED anyway), PHTLS (Pre-hospital trauma life support...especially if you do any prehospital stuff...more on that in a sec), CCEMT-P (Critical care emergency medical transport program). I have also been told that it is very worthwhile to become an instructor in ACLS and one of the other standard courses (TNCC, PALS, etc.).

    -prehospital. I have been given advice both ways about getting prehospital experience ("yeah work on the street for the autonomy and to understand the prehospital setting and use advanced airway skills" and "No, you are a nurse so focus on nursing, you will learn the prehospital stuff once you start"), but you already have prehospital experience so the point is moot and I am sure that that experience will be an adantage to you.

    Also, check out www.flightweb.com for a lot more info about this ....just search therough the Getting Started forum.

    Hope this was helpful.
  10. 0
    Quote from jbwozny
    First off I am not a flight nurse....merely another wannabe. Wat I have been told (from several flight nurses) is the kind of classic path is as follows....

    -approx 5 years of nursing experience split between ICU and ED. ICU for the critical thinking and exposure to those super sick patients. ED for volume, speed, trauma, getting good at assessments, triage, and physical skills. For the ED, I've heard Level 1 experience is best (for obvious reasons). For ICU, I have heard various opinions about which one is best and a pretty sound rationale for all of them. I would guess that whatever kind of unit it is, you would want it to have the highest possible acuity and exposure to different patients. I have also been told that getting some peds exp is very helpful.

    -certifications. CCRN and CEN certs are very helpful in getting a job and you learn a ton while studying for them.

    -courses. Obviously you have to have ACLS and PALS. Some programs require NRP. Most will put you through an ATLS(advanced trauma life support) audit or TNATC (transport nurse advanced trauma course) once you start working. Other courses that I have been told are helpful are TNCC (Trauma nursing core course) and ENPC (Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course....which you prob already have from working in the ED anyway), PHTLS (Pre-hospital trauma life support...especially if you do any prehospital stuff...more on that in a sec), CCEMT-P (Critical care emergency medical transport program). I have also been told that it is very worthwhile to become an instructor in ACLS and one of the other standard courses (TNCC, PALS, etc.).

    -prehospital. I have been given advice both ways about getting prehospital experience ("yeah work on the street for the autonomy and to understand the prehospital setting and use advanced airway skills" and "No, you are a nurse so focus on nursing, you will learn the prehospital stuff once you start"), but you already have prehospital experience so the point is moot and I am sure that that experience will be an adantage to you.

    Also, check out www.flightweb.com for a lot more info about this ....just search therough the Getting Started forum.

    Hope this was helpful.
    That is all about right...as for the prehospital experience i can tell you, depending on the flight service you are looking into, that will vary...I interviewed for a service that does probably 80% scene work, 20% Inter-hosp transports...They interviewed about 18 out of 300 something applicants...I am 3rd on the list to get hired(The list is good for a year). I was told took me to number 3 and not 1 or 2 was the minimal prehosp experience i had when i interviewed...So a flight service that does more inter facility work than scene work may not have the same want for a "street-wise" nurse as a primary scene helo. Either way good luck...
  11. 0
    I was curious if the military might be the way to go for a flgiht nurse hopeful? My understanding is that they like to grow their own.
  12. 0
    I wanted to become a flight nurse eventually in my career, but we have a level one trauma center and they say you have to be a EMT-P AND a RN! I am an EMT-B and will graduate this May with my BSN. How much longer would paramedic school take me??


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