RN to Paramedic Bridge Course - page 3

by ironjohn929 215,111 Views | 157 Comments

I'm wondering if any of you might know of a RN to Paramedic bridge course. I'd like to get my certification as a Paramedic, but don't want to have to through a whole year of school to do it! Let me know if you can help!... Read More


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    Quote from ironjohn929
    I'm wondering if any of you might know of a RN to Paramedic bridge course. I'd like to get my certification as a Paramedic, but don't want to have to through a whole year of school to do it! Let me know if you can help!
    I am an RRT EMT-B with ACLS. I would like to see several bridge courses like RRT to EMT-P, RN to EMT-P, EMT-P to RN just to name a few.
    medic9872 likes this.
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    As a Paramedic/flight Paramedic, with 25 years exp, the greater part of that in an ER based/flight program : (RN/Paramedic crew configuration) and also as a FT paramedic in a county based and funded system (not a 'private" - in the NW, Washington state, I hav to say i was a little taken aback with the comments to the original post,,condescending as they were.
    I know that, wages across the board, are perhaps less on the east coast,but let me assure you those RNS that poo-pood Paramedics- our state requires higher standards of our Paramedics, than any other, albeit Oregon.

    I noticed a few people posting,,,,that made ref: to paramedics not making a decent wage,,,,(and therefore being inferior)
    Well,,,,,,,,
    I make $24.60/hr,,,and 1 1/5 after 40 hrs/wk,,1 1/5 Educ. , 2x mandatory hrs.

    I have a great and long lasting interest in nursing,,,,,,i have always felt that, hospital and pre-hospital can and have, worked together well.

    I love and admire our ED rn's at our hospitals,,,nd where i used to fly Pt's to,,,,,,I want to go to RN school,.,,,,any thoughts as to where distance learning could be accessed?
    Jessy_RN, TwinMommy2403, and Peachy720 like this.
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    Quote from PA-C in Texas
    I really don't want to rain on anybody's parade, but the fact that someone can go to school for two weeks and walk out a Paramedic really frightens me. There are many advanced procedures Paramedics perform that I just don't believe two weeks can prepare you for. Are you ready to do a rapid sequence induction/intubation? Surgical airway? Needle thoracentesis? Pericardiocentesis? These are all things that many flight programs have in their protocols. I believe that the fields are separate and that proficiency in one does not necessarily denote proficiency in the other. I still maintain my paramedic license here in Texas, and I don't think any of you would be impressed if some college around here started a 2 week Paramedic to RN bridge course. Why? Because you recognize that it cannot be taught in that amount of time. That is the case here.
    The skills to perform the procedures you mentioned above can easily be taught in a two week course. In fact, you could probably teach 6th graders to do these things. The real skill comes not in performing the procedure, but knowing WHEN to perform it. This is why RNs in such programs are required to have several years of clinical experience...to ensure that they have a solid clinical backround and understand when and why to do these things. I believe that working 2 years in a busy ICU provides you with plenty of experience and insight to be a fully qualified paramedic after completion of a bridge course. What those graduates need to remember is that they are basically new grad paramedics. I would put money on the grads from an RN-EMT-P bridge course having better skills and knowledge than those from a traditional EMT-P course any day.

    On another note, does anybody know of any other RN-paramedic courses besides Creighton? That's the only one I could find.
    Jessy_RN, SoldierNurse22, and k-t-did like this.
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    [QUOTE=trumpetr]
    I noticed a few people posting,,,,that made ref: to paramedics not making a decent wage,,,,(and therefore being inferior)
    Well,,,,,,,,
    I make $24.60/hr,,,and 1 1/5 after 40 hrs/wk,,1 1/5 Educ. , 2x mandatory hrs.

    QUOTE]

    I would never say that paramedics are inferior to RNs...they are simply different, apples and oranges. Of course they overlap in many areas, mostly in the area of flight and transport.

    Your wages, however, show that you are indeed viewed as inferior by those who pay your salary. You've been at it for 26 years and are surely an expert at what you do, yet only make $24.60, while I've only been an RN for 1.5 years and make more than you do. An RN where I work with your experience would be making close to $40/hour. Sorry, but $24.60/hr for someone with your level of skill and experience isn't enough, in my opinion. The sad part is that it's pretty good for a medic.
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    [QUOTE=sway]
    Quote from trumpetr
    I noticed a few people posting,,,,that made ref: to paramedics not making a decent wage,,,,(and therefore being inferior)
    Well,,,,,,,,
    I make $24.60/hr,,,and 1 1/5 after 40 hrs/wk,,1 1/5 Educ. , 2x mandatory hrs.

    QUOTE]

    I would never say that paramedics are inferior to RNs...they are simply different, apples and oranges. Of course they overlap in many areas, mostly in the area of flight and transport.

    Your wages, however, show that you are indeed viewed as inferior by those who pay your salary. You've been at it for 26 years and are surely an expert at what you do, yet only make $24.60, while I've only been an RN for 1.5 years and make more than you do. An RN where I work with your experience would be making close to $40/hour. Sorry, but $24.60/hr for someone with your level of skill and experience isn't enough, in my opinion. The sad part is that it's pretty good for a medic.
    Ones salary is largely based on location when it comes to health care. In and around my town, my credential pays $15.24 to $16.00 (starting) while the hospitals two hours up the highway (in the same state) the same credential pays $21.00 to $26.00. You have to consider that an average apartment here is $350.00 and up there $700 you can see why there is a difference. So comparing ones salary from one part of the US to another is like the apples and oranges thing. By the way, here EMTs make about $6.00 an hour and medics make about $9.00 and hour or $18,000 per year.
    Jessy_RN likes this.
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    Quote from SMK1
    i have not real idea but maybe the reason it might take longer to bridge from paramedic to rn vs the other way around is that for acceptance into adn nursing schools chemistry and microbiology, nutrition chemistry is all required but the emt-p program does not require these (as well as the other gen ed. courses). The other sciences both groups take the same prerequesite courses. This is at least true in my area. So maybe the rational is that it shouldn't take RN's long to learn new procedures because they have a more extensive background education and should know the rational behind it? ( i have NO idea if this is true or not am just guessing what the reasons could be.) 2 weeks seems really short though to get comfortable with new procedures though, not to mention the fact that you will be doing a lot of your work in a fast moving vehicle!

    As an RRT/RN, I am a product of my local community college's first Paramedic/RRT to ADN bridge program. The paramedics that I went to school with all did very well (and all have passed NCLEX), but they had to learn to think like a nurse instead of a paramedic (as did I as a therapist). Paramedics are taught using a medical model from the way it was explained to us, unlike nursing, where we use the nursing process. The medics had a little trouble with this transition. They are used to putting the tube in, starting the IV, giving the meds, etc using protocols instead of waiting for docotor so and so to give the orders. My two cent...

    Also, I have been told that here in Florida, if you want to transition from RN to Paramedic, you can take a basic emt course and challenge paramedic state boards. Anyone have thoughts on that?
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    Quote from MAnders1405
    I am an RRT EMT-B with ACLS. I would like to see several bridge courses like RRT to EMT-P, RN to EMT-P, EMT-P to RN just to name a few.

    I agree this is a great thought, however, the downside is probably funding these programs, and having enough people interested in taking the classes. My RRT/Paramedic bridge started out with 10 people (in Central FL). Eight of those people commuted from N. FL and two quit...They didn't have that program avail this fall because of lack of interest.
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    Quote from Jim Rodgers
    Crieghton University in Neb. has had a INTENSIVE six(or 8)-week program in the past, you may check with them. I believe it is a very worthwhile combination. The flight program I work for(Portneuf LifeFlight, Pocatello, ID.) encourages all RN's to be cross-trained as paramedics. It makes staffing easier and a stronger program. I've done it backwards. I have been a paramedic for 17 years and just finished the RN program. I also teach in a community college and we are researching the idea of a RN to Paramedic bridge program.
    Will a paramedicís license transfer across state lines?
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    As long as you pass the National Registry, you should be good to go. Some states require that you take a state test as well.


    Quote from emergencyrmnurse
    Will a paramedicís license transfer across state lines?
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    Program in Ohio I am a paramedic in Ohio, and yes there is a bridge program in Ohio. Get in touch with Columbus, Ohio in the government area of Ohio and see if that helps.
    Quote from DuceRN
    Our flight program requires all transport nurses to get EMT-P cert. In Ohio there is a bridge course from RN to Medic, the class was approx 2 months long.


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