Nursing school and emt-b at the same time

  1. 0
    Hey, I just finished the 2nd semester of an ADN program. I want to take EMT-B with third semester but I am unsure what to expect. Has anyone taken emt-b and nursing classes at the same time? How'd it turn out? DO you advise it?


    Thanks
    Last edit by LV2BME on Dec 30, '08 : Reason: typed wrong letter

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 1
    I'm in the prenursing classes, and I am taking an EMT-B class also. I think it'd be interesting to hear the responses! The few I've had over in the student forum is that its a good idea esp if you want to work icu/trauma/er type thing.
    LV2BME likes this.
  4. 1
    I would check with an advisor in your nursing department before going that route. I know at our school, each semester has different demands, and you need to get a heads up before you overload yourself.
    LV2BME likes this.
  5. 1
    I would focus on nursing school at this point in time. While EMT-B is not a particularly difficult course, the focus should be on doing your best in nursing school. Graduate, pass the NCLEX, then you can focus your studies in EMS.

    Your third semester is going to be a bit different. You will most likely have complex didactic topics and will take on additional responsibilities in practicum. The expectations will be greater and you will most likely be under additional stress. I say hold off on EMT for the moment. In addition, the DOT-NSC (EMS curriculum) is set to change in 2009 with the whole push to implement the National EMS Scope of Practice. So, you could potentially get caught up in all of the transition if your state decides to make sudden changes.
    LV2BME likes this.
  6. 0
    I completed my EMT-B license a couple of years before I started nursing school. I graduate with my nursing degree in December and I think anyone who tries to do both at the same time are either nuts are like punishment. More power to anyone willing to give it a go but I would not suggest that route for anyone.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
  7. 1
    I'm currently working on my EMT-B while full time studying for my BSN. It's actually not that hard since a majority of what gets covered in an EMT course is learned in A&P courses and any basic first aid course. All it takes is some really good time management and some motivation. I would personally say go for your EMT-B at the same time cause it will help in the long run especially for when you do your health assessment courses and clinical rotations. Good luck!
    TheSquire likes this.
  8. 1
    Congrats on your endeavours!
    Personally, I DID do EMT and RN school at same time - wasn't that bad, more of a time crunch than anything, BUT - I was: young, single and had a VERY flexible part time job!

    The other factor was that the EMT thing was pretty basic for me. I had already logged several years as a First responder and being VERY involved with fire/ems at that time - so the EMT-B was just like a Long-Advanced-First-Responder Class!

    You need to do your own self assessment of the situation and consider your time/study committments and how much of a dedicated person you are to getting the things done you need to.

    Good luck!
    -MB
    Itshamrtym likes this.
  9. 0
    i did my emt-b during the 3rd semester of an associate degree program. It wasn't that hard. The hard part was coordinating clinicals. I had to take a 2 week period over christmas and new years eve to complete my clinicals in a way that did not conflict with nursing school. "You can get it if you really want. but you must try... try and try..."
  10. 0
    I just did my EMT-B during the first half of summer quarter for a master's-entry program. The EMT-B program itself was an 8-week, 16 hrs/wk accelerated version of the class, and I just sat the licensing exam last week. It's doable if you can swing the time management skills and as long as both the EMT and RN programs know you're doing the other and are willing to be not horrible about scheduling. However, like mwboswell, I too had previous EMS experience - 6.5 years volunteering with my college's EMS club, 3.5 years as a First Responder Defibrillator - so the EMS side of things were generally not new. If you have time, or (even better) have a summer off, by all means take the course.
  11. 0
    I did it....however it was during year 2 of my BSN so no clinicals. I didn't think it was difficult. Also look up RN to EMT online for bridge courses


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