Interesting Flight stories - page 2

Who has some interesting flight nurse stories to tell? Finish the paragraph in your own words; " We were on our way to........"... Read More

  1. by   qbingirl
    i enjoy reading these stories and jokes...please keep sharing...

    thanks
  2. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from willsrn
    who has some interesting flight nurse stories to tell? finish the paragraph in your own
    words; " we were on our way to........"
    i'm not a flight nurse, but years ago was good friends with a pilot. he tells this story on himself:

    "we were on our way to kalispell, montana to pick up a heart patient. (we were living in spokane at the time.) it was a dark, snowy night and we probably shouldn't have been flying, but the cardiologist insisted that he couldn't do anything for the guy in kalispell, and he needed to get him back to spokane so his partner could cath the guy. i'd flown to kalispell a thousand times, and i was sure i could do it in my sleep.

    we were almost to kalispell, and the snow was getting worse . . . no problem. i have instruments. huh? no instruments! ok, no problem. i've flown to kalispell a thousand times (well, a hundred anyway) and i can find that hospital in my sleep. i just fly up this valley, and the hospital is right . . . . . there! the hospital should be right there! it's all snowy and all, but i know where i am! oh, wait! there's the big building -- it's all covered with snow, but there it is! just in time, too, because it's all dark and my fuel is getting low, and that damned nurse is giving me a bad time about am i sure i know where i'm going. of course i know where i'm going. i'm the one flying this thing, you just worry about the patient.

    that's funny -- there's no lights in the landing area. they knew we were coming! why no lights? i've lander here a dozen times before and i never noticed that fence. or those utility poles! what's up with this? uh oh. this isn't the hospital."

    nor was it kalispell. he'd landed in a lumber yard just over the border into canada. once he landed, the royal canadian police showed up to demand what in the h he thought he was doing -- and they wouldn't let him take off again. the entire flight crew sat on that helicopter in that lumber yard all night while the canadian authorities burned up the phone lines talking to the folks back in spokane.

    i don't think he'll ever live that one down!



  3. by   jos11
    hi guys just new to this group and wanted to share one of my fligt experience.
    [color=#00ff00]one day when we are landing to a very small runway we were shocked to see that cows are running on the runway. but the pilots were very experienced and saved our life just 4 inches (of the right wing)
  4. by   Rio
    Last summer we were dispatched to a MVC. it was about midnight and there was some ground fog up near the LZ which was adjacent to a lake. unable to land due to the fog we coordinated with ground EMS to rendevous at an alternate site. we landed and the ambulance pulled in to the parking lot. as we were transferring the pt. to the helicopter we lost pulses and started to code the pt. long story short, the pt did not survive. we contacted medical control and called it at the scene. our pilot was in hte get go mode due to weather closing in and we had to cross a river valley to get home. we all did the walk around and beat feet out of there. once we got some altitude we could see the fog in the river valley was heavy and as we overflew the rural county airport (they have lights) we commented on that worse case we land there and wait it out.
    So by now it's 0200 and as we look out across the valley. there is no way were going to get home; the fog was like a blanket and spreading fast. The pilot said "coming right" and he banked us into a 180 and headed back to the airport. After a few minutes we saw faint lights and landed at the airport as the fog literally rolled in. We disembarked and you could barely see your hand outstretched in front of you.
    I grabbed a barrier sheet and laid it out in the grass and was settling in for the night when the pilot (a history buff) walked over and said "during the civil war, soldiers use to 'spoon' due to the lack of shelter." I opened my eyes and said...."SO, go get your own sheet!"
    The pilot said, "you took the last one."
    I said, "you can have the FAR side and NO SPOONING !"
    The medic laid down on the tarmac, propped his head on a skid and said "goodnight boys."
  5. by   Shamira Aizza
    We always tell the pilot he can have the stretcher....God knows I'm never going to lay on that disgusting thing.
  6. by   BittyBabyGrower
    I just have to share this one....we were going on a neonatal transport out to a smaller facility. We get there and we are just hovering and hovering...I turn my earset on to the pilots and here them saying..what an idiot! I look down and there in the middle of the big H of the landing pad is some yahoo security guard waving his arms like "Come on Down right here, I'm directing you like the guys at the airport..come on down" The pilots were grumbling...we should just land on him and say we never saw him. They had to radio our dispatch to call and get this bone head off the pad. Boy, did he get chewed out by our pilots
  7. by   getoverit
    just saw this thread. man, hard to pick a story. we've had security guards waving us into parking lots with a chain being whipped around by the rotor wash, we couldn't believe the guard wasn't clobbered by the thing. Fire depts. have "guided" us onto the interstate and I saw a tension cable at the very last second (so close I thought for sure we were going to ditch from 50').
    probably the most life-changing flight I ever had was responding to an 8 y.o. girl who had been in a rollover on an ATV. She had an open skull fx, significant oropharyngeal bleed, seizing, vomitting, no IV, HR 50s, barely palpable peripheral pulses when we landed. I started an EJ and gave her the versed & sux...then could not suction her out fast enough to ever see the cords. 2 failed attempts and I looked at the Lifepak, her HR 38 and SpO2 63%, her little hands were so blue and cold. I thought "Oh my God, we're going to end up doing CPR in just a minute."
    I said a small prayer (not being self-righteous, but that's just what I did), stuck my hand in her mouth, felt the base of the tongue/epiglottis and just lifted up on it and passed the ET tube that way. Started bagging and her HR/SpO2 immediately increased. To make a long story short she continued to improve on the flight in. Several months later I was walking out to the helicopter to get something and an older lady came toward me pushing a little girl in a wheelchair. I thought she was just wanting to see the aircraft so I went over to open the gate and the lady said "I remember you were the one who came for my grand-daughter." then I realized who they were. she now had a disconjugate gaze but could speak clearly, all I could remember was that little girl, covered in blood, laying there on the ground.
    I was completely choked up when the little girl wanted to show me how she was re-learning to walk. She took 2-3 steps and then fell into my arms, I"m not ashamed to say I completely lost it and sat there on the skids and cried with her Grandmother. I feel like a miracle happened and I just happened to be there to witness it, because I surely don't feel like I actually saved her life as much as God did.
    Don't know if anyone's still reading this thread but that's by far the most amazing experience I've had aside from the birth of my own kids.
    stay safe out there.
  8. by   Trauma1RN
    Quote from RNREMT-P
    just saw this thread. man, hard to pick a story. we've had security guards waving us into parking lots with a chain being whipped around by the rotor wash, we couldn't believe the guard wasn't clobbered by the thing. Fire depts. have "guided" us onto the interstate and I saw a tension cable at the very last second (so close I thought for sure we were going to ditch from 50').
    probably the most life-changing flight I ever had was responding to an 8 y.o. girl who had been in a rollover on an ATV. She had an open skull fx, significant oropharyngeal bleed, seizing, vomitting, no IV, HR 50s, barely palpable peripheral pulses when we landed. I started an EJ and gave her the versed & sux...then could not suction her out fast enough to ever see the cords. 2 failed attempts and I looked at the Lifepak, her HR 38 and SpO2 63%, her little hands were so blue and cold. I thought "Oh my God, we're going to end up doing CPR in just a minute."
    I said a small prayer (not being self-righteous, but that's just what I did), stuck my hand in her mouth, felt the base of the tongue/epiglottis and just lifted up on it and passed the ET tube that way. Started bagging and her HR/SpO2 immediately increased. To make a long story short she continued to improve on the flight in. Several months later I was walking out to the helicopter to get something and an older lady came toward me pushing a little girl in a wheelchair. I thought she was just wanting to see the aircraft so I went over to open the gate and the lady said "I remember you were the one who came for my grand-daughter." then I realized who they were. she now had a disconjugate gaze but could speak clearly, all I could remember was that little girl, covered in blood, laying there on the ground.
    I was completely choked up when the little girl wanted to show me how she was re-learning to walk. She took 2-3 steps and then fell into my arms, I"m not ashamed to say I completely lost it and sat there on the skids and cried with her Grandmother. I feel like a miracle happened and I just happened to be there to witness it, because I surely don't feel like I actually saved her life as much as God did.
    Don't know if anyone's still reading this thread but that's by far the most amazing experience I've had aside from the birth of my own kids.
    stay safe out there.
    That is awesome.
  9. by   kvsherry
    Have to confess a time when the helicopter should probably not have been called.

    During my volunteer BLS days about 45 minutes drive from the trauma center, I get called to a head on MVA on a busy 4 lane highway. Patient one is in his car awake and talking, no evidence of major trauma, really lucky. Says this other car just swerved right at him.

    Both cars had pretty bad damage, patient two not so great shape, she is unresponsive with no outward signs of trauma. Medics are already on the way, bird gets a green light. Patient one goes to the community hospital while patient two goes to the LZ with ALS on board. About a five minute wait once we get to the LZ and she is still unresponsive, definitely not faking, no odor of ETOH or anything, medics say, "while we're waiting, what's her sugar?" BOOM- sugar is 45! OOPS, push half an amp of D50 and she wakes up wondering why everyone is staring at her just as the chopper hits the ground. Boy were there some embarrassed faces and ****** off flight crew.

    Moral of the story: which came first the chicken or the egg; low BS causes unresponsiveness; causes MVA, need for ALS-you bet, need for helicopter transport? maybe not so much.
  10. by   Vikingkitten
    I do! I do!
    Back in the day, before every community, no matter how small, has an Air ambulance service, I was flying MAST out of Ft. Bliss, Tx. Had "routine" pick-up of 3 patients from Ft. Huachuca, all litters, all stable. Halfway to Wm. Beaumont Med. Ctr, the pt. in the middle litter CODES! Holy ****! did CPR and (what passed for ALS at the time ) all the way in. All survived, including the Crew Chief on his first flight as Chief.
    Last edit by SteveNNP on Apr 23, '08 : Reason: language per TOS
  11. by   GilaRRT
    Sierra Vista hospital to William Beaumont in a rotor? Pretty long flight eh?
  12. by   Flightgypsy
    I had an interesting call the other day. We were called to the local prison for an assault victim, an inmate. As I get into the ambulance where the pt was I see the pt is just lying there with his eyes closed. The medic tells me he was stabbed in the arm and hit and kicked in the head. Apparently he was very combative when they first arrived. Now he is just lying there and only opened his eyes to PAINFUL stimulus (sternal rub, trapezius muscle squeeze). GCS 7. He had a huge swelling and lacerations to his forehead. The medic tells me he is posturing as I do my assessment. Hard to tell as he was all immobilized and shackled. I tell my partner we will intubate in the aircraft and as soon as we take off the shackles and secure him down with our restraints and get the guard settled we take off. We intubated with no problem and his assessment really didn't change much, including his BP despite the fact we had to give him quite a lot of sedation as he would start fighting the vent.
    So the final diagnosis..... blood alcohol level >300!!! No head bleed or injury (Besides some lacs needing sutures) and he was shipped back to jail the next day. Moral of the story is even if it looks totally like a horse it could still be a zebra.
  13. by   Vikingkitten
    Quote from GilaRN
    Sierra Vista hospital to William Beaumont in a rotor? Pretty long flight eh?

    Yep, and was I exhausted by the time we got there. I think it was about the limit of our flying time.
    They had to pour me out of the bird when we got back to the airfield.

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