CCEMT-P?

  1. 0 This may be a dumb question, but I am slightly confused as to what the requirements are to gain the CCEMT-P certification. I may be reading it wrong, but does one have to be an actual EMT before gaining this? I have seen in some places online that nurses can gain this certification, but do they have to be an EMT also? I am interested in Critical Care Transport, and I have seen that the major teaching hospital in my state requires this cert to do Adult CC Transport.
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  3. Visit  traumasurgRN profile page

    About traumasurgRN

    From 'Florence, SC'; Joined May '12; Posts: 28; Likes: 18.

    15 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Medic09 profile page
    0
    Most places that offer the course (it is franchised from UMBC) state that it is open to nurses. I would say contact your local instructing agency or UMBC directly. That's the best way to be sure you get reliable information.
  5. Visit  akulahawkRN profile page
    1
    CCEMTP is the Critical Care Emergency Medical Transport Program. It's not a Paramedic course, and will not confer a Paramedic cert on anyone passing the course. From what I understand, it's a course that gives you an overall perspective on critical care transport. In short, it's essentially an intro course. It's not a comprehensive course that will render the graduate an expert in Critical Care Transport. That doesn't mean that it's not a good course. I may take it eventually. The fact that Paramedics, RN's, RT's, and others can take the course is actually a good thing because it provides a common basis for those different care providers to work from, and work together.
    SummitRN likes this.
  6. Visit  LearningByMistakes profile page
    0
    akulahawk has it correct, the CCEMTP course is a basic introduction to Critical Care Transport and it is open to RN's and RT's. I took my CCEMTP course in 2002 and enjoyed it. RWT NREMT-P, CCEMT-P, FP-C
  7. Visit  SummitRN profile page
    0
    I'll add that one to my "to do eventually" list.
  8. Visit  Paranemec profile page
    0
    Like the previous poster said, CCEMT-P is like a crash course to Critical Care for everyone. It's very good at covering a lot of the basics and is an amazing starting point for everyone. I also remember our instructors (Paramedics, RNs, and MDs) stating that the course is based off of the CCRN course. It's open to RNs, RTs, and Paramedics. I had about a year of CC experience in a high-volume system before I took it, and I felt that was about perfect for me.

    The only steps left as a Paramedic after that though are FP-C and CCP-C, but employers won't pay any more for those ($20/hour). Only way to advance from there is to switch fields and start over at square one.
  9. Visit  TraumaSurfer profile page
    0
    Quote from Paranemec
    The only steps left as a Paramedic after that though are FP-C and CCP-C, but employers won't pay any more for those ($20/hour). Only way to advance from there is to switch fields and start over at square one.
    Kinda cool to be called a Critical Care Paramedic after just 2 - 3 weeks of training in a class that is basically a no fail. Then you take a couple more tests which have books that feed you the Q&As. You then want more money even though you may have never seen the inside of an ICU or worked with a ventilator or IABP patient. No college is required with such classes like A&P or even college level math. This is more of a scam for charging a hired rate to CMS than actually providing quality competent care.
  10. Visit  LearningByMistakes profile page
    1
    Yes, we know TraumaSurfer, all Paramedics are worthless. Feel better now?
    Proudblood likes this.
  11. Visit  TraumaSurfer profile page
    1
    Quote from LearningByMistakes
    Yes, we know TraumaSurfer, all Paramedics are worthless. Feel better now?
    LearningByMistakes, Why do you think Paramedics are worthless? Those were not my words so they must be your thoughts. This is one reason why EMS is still stuck in 1970. Instead of taking note of the problems which exist in EMS education you resort to statements like "all Paramedics are worthless".
    My comment was about a cert which some try to pass off as a substitute for real education and experience.
    The Vanity of EMS
    SummitRN likes this.
  12. Visit  Nursing_chick profile page
    1
    So I'm a RN that works for a private Ambulance company that does CCT. We have rigs with: 1 RN an 2 CCEMT-P medics for the nurse calls and for independent CCT rigs with 2 CCEMT-P. The regular medics EMT-P have to work at the company for a while & be high performers even before they are considered for the CC team. They are then put thru the class before they are allowed to function on the team, even then they are paired with experienced CCEMT-P partners - I love & trust the medics I work with - I fully trust they know how to handle vents &/or IABP, just b/c I have RN behind my name doesn't mean we aren't equal - we just have different roles to play in the back of the ambulance.
    LearningByMistakes likes this.
  13. Visit  TraumaSurfer profile page
    0
    Quote from Nursing_chick
    So I'm a RN that works for a private Ambulance company that does CCT. We have rigs with: 1 RN an 2 CCEMT-P medics for the nurse calls and for independent CCT rigs with 2 CCEMT-P. The regular medics EMT-P have to work at the company for a while & be high performers even before they are considered for the CC team. They are then put thru the class before they are allowed to function on the team, even then they are paired with experienced CCEMT-P partners - I love & trust the medics I work with - I fully trust they know how to handle vents &/or IABP, just b/c I have RN behind my name doesn't mean we aren't equal - we just have different roles to play in the back of the ambulance.
    Let's take "love" out of the equation here. Personal preferences should not blind you on the job. How much training do your Paramedics receive in an actual ICU working with IABP and Ventilator patients? Here is an example of one "outstanding" CCT course...a whopping 72 hours. National EMS Academy offers Critical Care Transport Training for Acadian Ambulance Medics In California the CCTs use 1 RN and 2 EMT-Basics. What state are you from which requires 2 CCEMT-P and an RN for each patient? Unless the patient is on ECMO, usually 2 CCT trained professionals and an EMT (or not) driver is sufficient.
  14. Visit  SummitRN profile page
    0
    Trauma Surfer... what is your opinion of air ambulances (which primarily deal in CCT) using Nurse/Medic staffing? That seems to be the most common staffing (a few are Nurse/Nurse or Nurse/RRT or even Nurse/MD).
  15. Visit  TraumaSurfer profile page
    1
    Quote from SummitRN
    Trauma Surfer... what is your opinion of air ambulances (which primarily deal in CCT) using Nurse/Medic staffing? That seems to be the most common staffing (a few are Nurse/Nurse or Nurse/RRT or even Nurse/MD).
    After reading what other countries put their Nurses, RRTs and Paramedics through, I see some CCT transports as a band aid offering a speedy transport while hoping the patient doesn't die or require much intervention.

    Uk Hems Paramedics - Masters Degree Program - FlightWeb Forums

    You also must consider that the base education requirements for nurses, RRTs (Canada) and Paramedics in other countries are higher than the US. The US lags behind the rest of the civilized world in these professions which makes it disheartening to hear some RNs in the US complain about "all that time in school for an ADN" and see no use for the BSN.

    Several of the teams which utilize RN/RN or RN/RRT also require them to obtain the EMT or Paramedic cert. Most can do this with an abbreviated course from a community college. But, it is still just an additional cert for a few specialty skills and knowledge to compliment the education (degree) and experience they already have in critical care. In some places an RN on a hospital based transport team will get more intubations in 1 month than many Paramedics get in 1 year or even 5 years according to the statistics. If that is the case, I would prefer two providers who have extensive critical care bedside experience over someone who has just a 2 week CCEMT-P certification.

    But, some companies can not provide the intubation or current code experience for the RN so they rely on a Paramedic as the 2nd (and also for cost). This puts the majority of the "don't let them code" stress on the RN while the Paramedic might be very useful IF the patient codes. A Paramedic might be able to read a book or watch a video about an IABP or a ventilator to pass a test but until you have stayed for hours titrating meds and settings along with troubleshooting on multiple patients, you really are not equal for critical care experience and management of these patients. Short term management which is the focus of the Paramedic with a few meds and long term stabilization are two very different practices. The RN is accustomed to many more guidelines for titrating more meds specific to a disease process. The Paramedics goes with an algorithm which can be pretty generic for a short term transport. It is easier to teach an RN a few skills to compliment their education and experience from a critical care setting.

    Of course not all RNs come from high acuity ICUs and not all Paramedics are equal. But, in the US, the expectations of the Paramedic is much lower for CCT teams. If you look at the ads, all they want from Paramedics are the basic requirements to maintain a Paramedic cert. Some might want the Flight or CCP certs but those are not that difficult and no additional degrees or experience is required. Some companies do want the RNs to hold BSNs along with a CCRN and other alphabet.

    If the CCT also transports children and neonates, I think it should be an absolute requirement to have at least 1 year of experience in a Pediatric ICU and at least 1 year in a neonatal ICU. If the team is RN/Paramedic, it is just not safe for neither crew member to not have extensive bedside critical care experience for kids/babies and try to fly with just the "small adult" mentality.

    Another thing I hear in the EMS community is that nobody supports them. But, few seem to have gotten involved to see who is going to bat for them for standards. This is an example from CAMTS. There are many organizations associated with EMS and Paramedics on various committees or directors which represent them.

    Eagle Med - When life's on the line, we're in the air.

    But, CAMTS is also a voluntary accreditation.

    This is a good article. While what you said is true about RN/Paramedic being the most common crew configuration, the RRT is use as a 3rd 73%. Sometimes that might mean bumping the Paramedic.

    http://download.journals.elsevierhea...1X12002726.pdf
    SummitRN likes this.


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