Will Someone Please respond ?

  1. I have posted this same thread in two other places and only had one response... do any of you have an opinion?

    Ok....
    I just wondered if anyone had any advise... or thoughts on the pros and cons of Hospital based programs and Community College programs.... I'm having a hard deciding... I live in Los Angeles County (CA) and they have a hospital based RN program and they even have a contract program where they will pay for you to attend so long as you commit to work for them for "X" number of years...will I get more clinical experience this way? Will I be employable at other facilities after my contract is up? I can't really afford to go to an expensive four-year so these are my options right now. I had considered going the CC route by getting my LVN first... but I have a feeling that the school does most of their clinicals at LTC facilites and I really want to be an RN in the long run and honestly Im afraid that I'll get pigeonholed in LTC .... Has anyone else done a hospital based program?
    S
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    What's the hospital like? I would suggest you try to talk to some people who work there. Sit in the cafeteria and accostnurses if you have to. Them paying your way does sound like a good deal as long as the place isn't a hole. How many years do you have to commit? With the current nursing shortage, anyone with RN or LPN behind their names is plenty employable, so it would depend on the specifics of each program. How many hours of clinical, what kind of rotations do they do, what degree will you be granted on completion, how successful are their students when it comes to N-CLEX pass rates and employment after grad etc.? Without that info I have no idea what sounds better.
  4. by   Burn NA
    Sounds like a good deal to me. You would be an "RN" with a few years of experience under your belt, and they are paying for it. There is no question about your marketability afterwards -- the shortage of nurses is only growing, nation-wide. If you decided to eventually leave the hospital, you would have the "one year" (or more) of experience that other employers seek. One year of ANY kind of nursing experience is valuable. A nurse from a LTC facility can ALWAYS switch into a different kind of nursing.

    I'm in a BSN program, but a friend of mine opted for a hospital-based program rather than go for her BSN (she was accepted into both programs). After weighing the pros/cons, she chose the route that fits her the best.

    Go for it!
  5. by   Burn NA
    I may have accidentally confused your 2 options. After re-reading your post, I THINK that you can either 1)sign up for the hospital-based program (RN), or 2)pay to go to a community college. My advice would be to take the free route, once you go over your contract & understand & agree to the type of commitment involved. Both take you to the same goal (RN), right? Take the free route.

    And I agree with fergus51 -- interview current students & instructors in both programs. Visit the clinical sites. Know what you are getting yourself into. Good luck!
  6. by   TCW
    I would suggest that you try and find out as much as you can about the hospital that is willing to pay for your education. It may turn out to be a crappy facility and you'd be forced to stay there or pay back the tuition that they paid for you.

    I thought about going that same route, but I decided against it because I didn't like the idea that I might have to stay some place that I didn't like.

    Tonya
  7. by   meownsmile
    I have to agree, some good hard investigation needs to be done by you.
    Just a few questions you may want to consider.......
    Are any of the hospital based classes actually transferrable to a regular college if you decide to continue your education later? Look at the commitment time required vs the amount they are willing to pay in tuition. Are they willing to give you a sign on bonus also after you get done with the program? Will they pay for NCLEX review courses, NCLEX exam, pay you the day of your NCLEX? All of these things are being done by a lot of hospitals. Do they require you to work for them as a tech a certain number of hours a pay period to allow the tuition, do you have to maintain a certain GPA to be eligable for the tuition?

    My hospital had a tuition reimbursment program, but i decided against it. They wouldnt pay for enough of my tuition to make it worth my while and i would have had to sign on for one year for each semester they "helped with". It also tied me down to one place after graduation and with the market for nuses wide open i wasnt willing to make that commitment before i even got started. In my case it worked out pretty well because they didnt know if i was coming back there to work or not. I got a higher starting rate than other "new grads" and i got a fair shake on scheduling they offered. I know its a lot to think about, and there are a lot of variables. Just look at it closely and get the full picture before you decide. You might even consider calling a few other hospitals and hearing their incentives to help you decide.
  8. by   slinkeecat
    I think you really have to look at the terms of the contract the hospital is going to ask you to sign...if the time commitment after graduating and getting lisenced is not something you want to commit to than you might want to check out the Community College route and check into financial aid and etc..... I would way the options... if you like where you live and it is a question of money than you need to take the free route. Then just persevere and think of it as a wonderful learning opportunity
  9. by   prmenrs
    If you do go to the hospital program, ask if you will have an ADN at the end of it--that will make it easier to go to an "articulated program" to get your BSN; some articulated programs, you can even get an MSN.

    Lots of homework for you, checking on all this. I'd start talking to the hospital school, and take a list of questions!!!

    Good Luck!
  10. by   sharann
    The above have good sound advice. My only concern is how they would (or wouldn't) "utilize" the students. You want to make sure that during clinicals, you aren't counted as staff, etc...As for which route you take, it has to be the one that works best for you, emotionally and financially as well as physically. If you can pass the boards, you are a nurse.
  11. by   nrs2bme
    I know the Hospital Program will get me the ADN... I have to take pre-reqs just like everyone else but I do that at a local CC and then apply... the general ed classes like Engl, Speech ,etc.. I already completed when i was getting my degree in business. I know I will be able to sit for boards as well. Im waiting for the counselor to get back from a two week break to make my appt to meet w/ them but I plan on going out to the hospital this week sometime. I can tell you that it is a County Facility and so I will most likley be exposed to a lot of "variety"... I think I will get a lot of expierience I might not get somewhere else. Also I grew up in this area and I can't imagine living anywhere else so that's not a problem. Thank you all for the sound advise. I really appreciate it!
    S
  12. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by TCW
    I would suggest that you try and find out as much as you can about the hospital that is willing to pay for your education. It may turn out to be a crappy facility and you'd be forced to stay there or pay back the tuition that they paid for you.

    I thought about going that same route, but I decided against it because I didn't like the idea that I might have to stay some place that I didn't like.

    Tonya
    Good point Tonya



    marie

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