When does the Confidence Kick in and the Timidness Leave!

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    I have only been a nurse since May 2011. I have been off orientation for a month now, but I am still so cautious and timid. I don't want to make a mistake or leave work undone. I work nights! Now that I am on my own I have to question everything I do (i.e. meds, explanations to patients, decisions that I make). Examples, a day nurse left me in chaos, should I have told her to stay and help me with the choas that she created? A nurse questioned the way I choose to give my medication (protonix x 72 hours on a primary line going at 8mg/hr with another primary NS going at 100ml/hr to keep her well hydrated, Both y-sited below iv pump. She was old) do I tell her that I called the pharmacist and he okayed my decision and also sought additional feedback from my coworkers?



    I just wanna know when do you start to feel confident? Not so timid? 1 Year? 2? Please, any advice is great I am so stressed.
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Seriously girl-you don't have time to be timid. Yes ask the nruse that leaves you in a disaster-zone that she created to stay and help. In fact don't ask-just say, "I really appreciate you staying to help me with all this until we get everything caught up and sorted out here." On my floor we make it an after report occurence to ask if there's anything we can help that nurse with before we leave. They should expect it.

    And yes tell old-bitty nurse that was questioning you that you called pharmacy and verified with them. If she's still concerned call the charge RN and tell her the issue. She'll let you know whether you should proceed with the way you were infusing the protonix.

    You will start getting confidence around the 6 month mark. It will probably start even earlier with a good occurence (first try IV start, handled a complicated case well, pt you bond with that thinks you really know your stuff). It will continue to grow throughout the first year. Its not about knowing everything because as a fellow new grad let me tell you we know very little. Its about asking the right people, knowing who your resources are so that when you are doing things you have confidence that they are being done right. Then when you go back to do them again you have it in the bag. Chin up-It gets better. Not easier, but better. You will do great. Find your inner strength and fake it till you make (but always ask questions fo course). Good luck!!
  5. 0
    thank you
  6. 0
    It varies with the tasks/info needed. You will continuously feel better about things, and then be able to build more and more on the foundation you have. It takes a couple of years to really feel like you don't have to double check everything

    You'll be ok :heartbeat
  7. 2
    I completely understand how you feel! I just got off orientation this week (I had been on this unit as an Extern for a year prior to graduation, so I figured the transition would be a piece of cake!) I was very wrong! I did great with preceptors but the first day on my own everything that could go wrong did go wrong! I am very lucky to work with an amazing staff, who were all more than willing to help me my first day alone. I ended up staying almost an hour late because I am too afraid to leave things for the next shift.

    As for the medication thing, I have learned (since I had 3 different preceptors) that everyone has their own way! One preceptor would show me how she hangs potassium or vanco and the next would tell me I should do it a different way. I think its all personal preference and if you spoke to pharmacy and are confident in the way you have done it then stand up for yourself !

    We will get the hang of it, and not be so scared to make a mistake. I precepted with a nurse that has only been an RN for 2 years and she said she had a much harder time than I am having and you could never tell! She is knowledgeable, confident, and already precepting newbies! We can do this!
    RNdiva505 and xtxrn like this.


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