What are some important abbreviations I should be familiar with? What are some important abbreviations I should be familiar with? - pg.2 | allnurses

What are some important abbreviations I should be familiar with? - page 3

What are some important abbreviations I should be familiar with as an LVN/LPN?... Read More

  1. Visit  eatmysoxRN profile page
    0
    One abbreviation I've refrained from using for the most part is SOB, and that's only because I've experienced wrath of a family member who saw it written on a patients board and they were angry.

    Patients are unfamiliar with abbreviations and they shouldn't be used around them. NPO is one I see written on boards all the time. I had no idea what that meant before I took a CNA class. It's confusing sometimes. C/d/I (clean/dry/intact) I see all the time and bsb (bedside bag). HA and CA... Headache I can see but abbreviating cancer to Ca makes me think of calcium.

    ~ No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent -Eleanor Roosevelt ~
  2. Visit  anotherone profile page
    0
    at work when i see one in notes (typed in emr at least) that i dont know in google it and its context that helps. i see the following very often :
    ac(before meals)

    hs(bed time)

    prn(as needed)

    npo(nothing by mouth)

    tah (total abdominal hysterectomy)

    crrt( continous renal replacement therapy)

    hd (hemodialysis)

    nc (nasal cannula)

    hft (humidified fast tent)

    mm (mist mask)

    sob (short of breath)

    doe (dyspnea on exertion)

    hob (head of bed)

    cdi (clean dry and intact)

    i work in acute care and see the same ones over and over and based on the type of dr and pt i can usually tell what it is. your work place should have a list of approved ones. the other ones, search online or ask someone but i wouldnt use them unless facility approved
  3. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    1
    Quote from amoLucia
    That entry of ST referred to SORE THROAT, like HA = headache. When I would question the writers, they usually become very defensive, like WHY hadn't I ever seen ST or HA???
    At everywhere I worked, ST is the approved abbreviation for sinus tach. I'm not sure if it is approved for sore throat also, but I have never seen it.
    anotherone likes this.
  4. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    Quote from eatmysoxRN
    One abbreviation I've refrained from using for the most part is SOB, and that's only because I've experienced wrath of a family member who saw it written on a patients board and they were angry.

    Patients are unfamiliar with abbreviations and they shouldn't be used around them. NPO is one I see written on boards all the time. I had no idea what that meant before I took a CNA class. It's confusing sometimes. C/d/I (clean/dry/intact) I see all the time and bsb (bedside bag). HA and CA... Headache I can see but abbreviating cancer to Ca makes me think of calcium.

    ~ No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent -Eleanor Roosevelt ~
    I probably would not use SOB on the pt's white board or on something else (such as discharge instructions) that I am going to give to the pt. However, I use short of breath enough (often "denies SOB") in my charting that SOB becomes useful. I suppose if the pt requests their chart after the fact, they will see "SOB," but it is a very handy approved abbreviation.

    As for NPO...patients will ask "can I have something to drink?" Some ER staff will say to the patient "no, you are NPO until you are seen by the doctor." I imagine that most patients have no clue what NPO means.

    Also, I have never seen bsb. Is that like a foley bag?
  5. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    One that I see frequently, especially in triage notes, that is not approved is TKR (or THR). I had a doctor ask me what that abbreviation meant (I was not the one who wrote it). It stands for 'total knee replacement' (the latter is 'total hip replacement'). Seems simple enough, but the abbreviation loses its effectiveness (and can become dangerous) when your fellow staff does not know what it stands for.

    Also, usually "CSM" intact is the approved abbreviation for "circulation, sensation, movement" intact. This is used, for example, when talking about the fingers (i.e. brisk cap refill, still able to sense, still able to move) after a wrist injury. One triage nurse charted "PSM intact." A resident asked me what that stood for. My best guess was "pulse, sensation, movement" (?). I never did get a chance to ask the triage nurse what she meant with that.
  6. Visit  AngelfireRN profile page
    2
    I remember clearly seeing one teenage patient lapse into sobs and ask if she was being punished. She asked if she behaved better, would we give her other things to eat? Poor baby, she was in with some stomach complaint and was on a BRAT diet. The dietary staff left the card on her tray with BRAT on it. She thought it was an assessment of her attitude.

    Oddly, she acted better than some of my adult patients.
    anotherone and psu_213 like this.
  7. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    0
    Had an upset daughter approach me, questioning why the staff was calling her Mom a CABG. After my explanation, she was OK, but how easy it is for us all to forget our 'workplace jargon' is NOT common language to all others.
  8. Visit  NursingBro profile page
    1
    COLD SOB.

    chronic obstructive lung disease, shortness of breath
    amoLucia likes this.
  9. Visit  HyperSaurus, RN profile page
    3
    LOL ( little old lady), FOS (full of ....).
    Just kidding. We have a list of approved abbreviations for orders, but we also have abbreviations that we use for report and such.
    Others we use include:
    STD--spot the dot (our falls risk program--look for the yellow dot on the chart and door and look for the yellow falls risk wrist bands)
    SOB--short of breath
    HA--headache
    ACHS--before meals and at hour of sleep
    DWT--daily weight
    SCDs--sequential teds
    CA--cancer (half our unit is oncology, we get a lot of cancer patients)
    NHP--nursing home placement
    WA--while awake
    Dssg--dressing
    Cxr--chest x-ray
    Bcx--blood culture

    I usually write things out on the boards, "nothing by mouth," "up with assistance", and "falls risk" (could you imagine family reaction to STD on someone's board?)
    anotherone, psu_213, and BrandonLPN like this.
  10. Visit  jpowell6024 profile page
    0
    Get the app "mini nurse lite". When reading charts, I have that pulled up. It has a section that you can type in the letters and it will tell you what they mean. VERY helpful!

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