VA hospitals good for new grad?

  1. 0
    Hi! I'm a new graduate currently in Massachusetts. I'm trying to find a nursing position. As you all know, MA has tons of good medical centers, however, I hold a current CA license and my MA license is still pending,which means if I want to work as a RN, I can only work in VA hospitals who accepts out of state licensure.
    Are VA hospitals good for a start? Or should I start working as a nursing assistant in other hospitals while my MA license is pending and then apply for a new grad training program in one of the Medical centers in Boston?

    Thanks!
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 2,088 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 8 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    The VA would be just fine for you. Each facility is different. Do you like this one or want it only because you can work there right away? Something to consider. The government also has excellent retirement benefits.
  6. 0
    Yes, the VA is a great place to work with good benefits. You might also try the Nurse Registries in MA, or perhaps a traveling nurse company. I am soon to be a new grad, and I work at a VA in CA as a Student Tech. You can also tell potential employers that you have a current CA license and are waiting for your MA license. Many states allow you to practice under your original license while waiting for your new one. Check with the Board of Registered Nursing in MA to verify if they will do that. Meanwhile, don't short yourself of hard-earned potential pay as an RN to work as a CNA (yikes). Also, MA might allow you to work on an interim permit (CA does), which means you can be earning RN pay!

    Quote from share
    Hi! I'm a new graduate currently in Massachusetts. I'm trying to find a nursing position. As you all know, MA has tons of good medical centers, however, I hold a current CA license and my MA license is still pending,which means if I want to work as a RN, I can only work in VA hospitals who accepts out of state licensure.
    Are VA hospitals good for a start? Or should I start working as a nursing assistant in other hospitals while my MA license is pending and then apply for a new grad training program in one of the Medical centers in Boston?

    Thanks!
  7. 0
    Quote from liebling5
    Yes, the VA is a great place to work with good benefits. You might also try the Nurse Registries in MA, or perhaps a traveling nurse company. I am soon to be a new grad, and I work at a VA in CA as a Student Tech. You can also tell potential employers that you have a current CA license and are waiting for your MA license. Many states allow you to practice under your original license while waiting for your new one. Check with the Board of Registered Nursing in MA to verify if they will do that. Meanwhile, don't short yourself of hard-earned potential pay as an RN to work as a CNA (yikes). Also, MA might allow you to work on an interim permit (CA does), which means you can be earning RN pay!
    Thanks guys! I've sent out resumes and got calls from recruiters. It seems that they don't want to offer me CNA positions as well. They say there's no point in offering me a CNA position while I might be able to work as a RN within weeks. Guess I'll just keep trying different facilities. I learn something new each day! ^^
  8. 0
    Quote from liebling5
    Yes, the VA is a great place to work with good benefits. You might also try the Nurse Registries in MA, or perhaps a traveling nurse company. I am soon to be a new grad, and I work at a VA in CA as a Student Tech. You can also tell potential employers that you have a current CA license and are waiting for your MA license. Many states allow you to practice under your original license while waiting for your new one. Check with the Board of Registered Nursing in MA to verify if they will do that. Meanwhile, don't short yourself of hard-earned potential pay as an RN to work as a CNA (yikes). Also, MA might allow you to work on an interim permit (CA does), which means you can be earning RN pay!
    I don't know of any state that will let you work on another state's license while waiting for the one from that state. They will issue you an interim permit, only then can you work. You would not be licensed in that state otherwise.

    Perhaps you are speaking of the compact states, if you live in one, and have a permanent residence there, you can work in another of the compact states without having to get a license in that state.
  9. 0
    One more thing you might try is calling the Board of Nursing to follow up on your MA license. As you know from CA, many states licensing are computerized and it doesn't take as long to obtain your results as it did in the past. It might even be available online.

    God bless.


    Quote from share
    Thanks guys! I've sent out resumes and got calls from recruiters. It seems that they don't want to offer me CNA positions as well. They say there's no point in offering me a CNA position while I might be able to work as a RN within weeks. Guess I'll just keep trying different facilities. I learn something new each day! ^^
  10. 0
    Hi! I just graduated in Dec. (Passed NCLEX, yeah!!) and my FAVORITE professor would not stop hailing the wonderful opportunities at the VA Hospital where she works. She says they have a wonderful training program that does not leave you in a lurch, and will transfer you to any state you want if you are moving. The benefits are wonderful, and also carry state-to-state. You are right; your liscence does, too. Albeit we are in NJ, I think this would be okay for you. Good luck.
  11. 0
    Quote from suzanne4
    I don't know of any state that will let you work on another state's license while waiting for the one from that state. They will issue you an interim permit, only then can you work. You would not be licensed in that state otherwise.

    Perhaps you are speaking of the compact states, if you live in one, and have a permanent residence there, you can work in another of the compact states without having to get a license in that state.

    suzanne,

    VA medical centers and military hospitals fall under the control of the federal, not state government, and are not held to the regulations of the states in which they are located. In order to practice in such a facility, one must posess a valid license issued by ANY state in the US. It is also possible to practice overseas in a military institution with a valid license from any state in the US.
  12. 0
    i read that the VA pays up to 25% shift diff ! sweet


Top