Updates - page 2

Hi, as you know, I am off orientation. Been on my own for almost a month now. Things are going "ok", I guess. There are still alot of skills that I haven't gotten yet, and when I do get a new... Read More

  1. by   PPHawk
    I think you did fine. What you need to think about as your shift comes to an end, is that you're leaving any problems for a nurse who doesn't have easy access to help, other than 911. Most of the time, night shift is just full of paperwork, but then there are nights that leave day shift looking like a cakewalk. Just the other night, our night nurse had a patient go into respiratory distress and almost arrested, because of a new med. That was a 911 adventure. Shortly after, a patient fell out of bed. No injuries, but added work. Then a diabetic patient bottomed out. Not a typical night, but they can happen.
    And if she called the doctor, he just might yell at her because you didn't call him sooner. Maybe next time you could ask for guidelines about calling him back after implementing any orders. I've worked with some wonderful MD's, some stupid ones that scare me, and some really mean and nasty ones. And then the covering doctors that won't order anything because they "Don't know the patient." Then why cover? To them MD just means 'more dough'. Maybe that had something to do with her attitude.
    So at the end of your shift, may I suggest that you put yourself in her place and ask, what would I want me to have done. Or offer to do something before you leave, like, "would you like me to call the doctor again before I go?" You'll find you have enough stress without dreading the arrival of your relief nurse. On the other hand, don't go crazy worrying about pleasing her...she knows what the job is too.
  2. by   Epona
    Geeezzz... Ok.. thanks all. I was just curious. Thank you! :spin:
  3. by   RNLisa
    Quote from PPHawk
    I think you did fine. What you need to think about as your shift comes to an end, is that you're leaving any problems for a nurse who doesn't have easy access to help, other than 911. Most of the time, night shift is just full of paperwork, but then there are nights that leave day shift looking like a cakewalk. Just the other night, our night nurse had a patient go into respiratory distress and almost arrested, because of a new med. That was a 911 adventure. Shortly after, a patient fell out of bed. No injuries, but added work. Then a diabetic patient bottomed out. Not a typical night, but they can happen.
    And if she called the doctor, he just might yell at her because you didn't call him sooner. Maybe next time you could ask for guidelines about calling him back after implementing any orders. I've worked with some wonderful MD's, some stupid ones that scare me, and some really mean and nasty ones. And then the covering doctors that won't order anything because they "Don't know the patient." Then why cover? To them MD just means 'more dough'. Maybe that had something to do with her attitude.
    So at the end of your shift, may I suggest that you put yourself in her place and ask, what would I want me to have done. Or offer to do something before you leave, like, "would you like me to call the doctor again before I go?" You'll find you have enough stress without dreading the arrival of your relief nurse. On the other hand, don't go crazy worrying about pleasing her...she knows what the job is too.

    Thank you, that's good advice. In my case, the doctor is the hospitalist and is VERY nice. He doesn't mind phone calls really. The whole thing was that I had called him at like 5 pm, the next shift came in at 7 pm, so as I said, fluids were hung around 5:30 pm so it was only 1 1/2 hours for fluids to get into her system at 100/hr. IF I had called him again, I am not so sure he would have ordered anything more right then. But, as I said before, I am new so I wasn't sure. I had 3 other patients that I had took over care for at 4:30 pm I still needed to assess on top of my other 2 patients (including the 88 year old). I am not trying to make excuses, but my two other nurses on my shift were aware of my situation too. It was just the night shift nurse just kind of had that "look" when I told her of the situation, even after I told her I called the doc only 2 hours earlier. I guess from now on, to make everyone happy (except the doc, LOL), I will call for everything. Not trying to be sarcastic, but trying to cover my a**.
  4. by   PPHawk
    Quote from RNLisa
    Thank you, that's good advice. In my case, the doctor is the hospitalist and is VERY nice. He doesn't mind phone calls really. The whole thing was that I had called him at like 5 pm, the next shift came in at 7 pm, so as I said, fluids were hung around 5:30 pm so it was only 1 1/2 hours for fluids to get into her system at 100/hr. IF I had called him again, I am not so sure he would have ordered anything more right then. But, as I said before, I am new so I wasn't sure. I had 3 other patients that I had took over care for at 4:30 pm I still needed to assess on top of my other 2 patients (including the 88 year old). I am not trying to make excuses, but my two other nurses on my shift were aware of my situation too. It was just the night shift nurse just kind of had that "look" when I told her of the situation, even after I told her I called the doc only 2 hours earlier. I guess from now on, to make everyone happy (except the doc, LOL), I will call for everything. Not trying to be sarcastic, but trying to cover my a**.
    I didn't realize that you'd hung it so close to your shift end. I still think you did fine and I wouldn't have called the doctor back that soon either. Maybe she just didn't sleep well.
  5. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from RNLisa
    I am sorry, it won't happen again.
    That's o.k. Lisa. Nursing is STRESSFUL. I was just trying to get the jist of what happened, and don't think that you really did anything wrong. Everyone deals with things differently.

    I have one suggestion when dealing with other nurses esp. during report. Try not to read into facial expressions - if something is said deal with that. But I think ppl don't even realize all the time what flashes across their face. They may be expressing the stress of what they have to do not what you didn't do. Not always, but sometimes.

    Take care!
  6. by   olaboss
    BTW, tea and esp. coffee are diuretics, they will only serve to lower her blood pressure. Not sure if decaf coffee/tea will.

    Always ask the other nurses on your shift when you're not sure what to do.[/quote]


    Most people believe that caffeine does cause dehydration but a recent study by Professor Armstrong at the University of Connecticut showed that caffeine is no more or a diuretic than water is.
    ific.org : Caffeine and Dehydration: Myth or Fact? (NewsBite)

    Coffee: The New Health Food?

    Coffee is the King!! Espresso is it's purest form

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