Trouble with seasoned nurses?

  1. Hello everyone!

    I graduated my program on August 18th. I have recently passed boards and accepted my new job on a Med/Surg floor of a local small hospital.

    I was just wondering if any new nurses are experiencing any trouble from some of the more experienced nurses??

    I know that I am brand new and that I have a lot to learn, but there is also alot that I know. Sometimes i feel that they are trying to trip me up and make me feel stupid. This is especially evident during report. I try very hard all during shift to write myself notes so that i will be prepared for report. But they always seem to ask me some question that either I dont know that answer to or that i have never heard of. I makes the last 20 minutes of a 12 hour shift the worst part of the day.

    Does anyone have any suggestions or comments that may help me make the transition from student nurse to LPN a little more smooth?

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Melina
    Quote from AprylLPN
    ...I try very hard all during shift to write myself notes so that i will be prepared for report. But they always seem to ask me some question that either I dont know that answer to or that i have never heard of. I makes the last 20 minutes of a 12 hour shift the worst part of the day...
    It sounds like your coworkers just want you to be the best you can be. Do you get the answer to the question, or look up the procedure you never heard of? Do you make sure you have the information the next time it comes up? Approaching report as a learning experience may make things less stressful. There will always be things you don't know.

    ~Mel'
  4. by   augigi
    Usually though, handover questions are because you want to know something. If you don't know, just say "I don't know, but I can find out if you'd like". Keep a notebook with you and write down the questions - if it's something worthwhile, consider including it in your next report. If not, just say "Not sure, sorry". You're learning, and you're meant to be learning, not to know everything. I've been an RN for 10 years, and there are often things asked at report which I haven't thought of, so I just let them know that. If they really want to know, they can find out. If it's something major, I should have passed it on.

    Another good way is to do a systematic report. Start at the head, and work your way down. You rarely miss things that way. Good luck! Let us know if it improves!
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 15, '07 : Reason: TOS language
  5. by   crb613
    There are a few nurses where I work that enjoy doing stuff like that. No matter how well you have prepared & give report...its not enough. These nurses are known for their 20 q's at report.....some get really nervous when they know report will be to these nurses. They have been known to stop report make a big scene, & want you to go look it up in the chart. UH nooo I give what is needed not a detailed past medical hx. This happened to me once. I was very polite and said I do not know to the q....and no I won't look it up. I am giving you report and you can look it up if you like when we are finished...do you want the rest of report? Now if it was something that pertained to their immediate care/condition, & I had omitted it then yes I would....
  6. by   JenNJFLCA
    I am very fortunate to work on a floor with AWESOME experienced nurses. They are the reason I chose to work on that floor because they are all so patient and willing to help me. If I ever have a patient that is going bad or coding, I know my coworkers will be by my side. Not the case on some other units I have been on. Sometimes grumpy nurses float to my floor, but I just roll with the punches with them. I don't let things get to me most of the time. I really think that is they key to surviving nursing. When you are getting punches from all directions (staff, family, doctors, etc) you need have the attitude that you're doing your best, learn from your experiences (good and bad), sing a little song in your head, do a little dance , and take care of your patients and yourself.
  7. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from JenNJFLCA
    I am very fortunate to work on a floor with AWESOME experienced nurses. They are the reason I chose to work on that floor because they are all so patient and willing to help me. If I ever have a patient that is going bad or coding, I know my coworkers will be by my side. Not the case on some other units I have been on. Sometimes grumpy nurses float to my floor, but I just roll with the punches with them. I don't let things get to me most of the time. I really think that is they key to surviving nursing. When you are getting punches from all directions (staff, family, doctors, etc) you need have the attitude that you're doing your best, learn from your experiences (good and bad), sing a little song in your head, do a little dance , and take care of your patients and yourself.
    Thanks for being one of the few people here to acknowledge that there are some nice experienced nurses out there.
  8. by   shull
    aprylLPN It makes me feel sick to my stomach when I hear this kind of nonsense! I was an LPN for years then went on for my RN then med/surg certification, then my BS and now I teach the LPN program and it is that kind of behavior that pushed me to teach. I don't know why NURSES feel the need or think they are so superior to everyone else that they have to make you feel small. I think they are so insecure that their behavior make them feel good SHAME ON THEM!! You are a good nurse I am sure and you must be very confident in yourself, don't let them get you down. Have you tried asking friendly nurses to critique you on a report maybe that would help or ask your manager to sit in on report to give you feedback, I did that on occasion when I was nurse manager in a hospital and Director of Nursing in a nursing Home. Keep your head up and keep us posted on the outcome!! good luck, shull
  9. by   klmRN234
    What you have described doesn't just happen to new nurses. I have been a nurse over 20 years and sometimes in report I get asked the most obscure question about a patient. If I don't know, I'll say "I don't know, let's both try to find that answer. Don't take it personally. I'll also give you a little hint....even us seasoned nurses don't know it all!
  10. by   iwilldothis
    Quote from klmRN234
    What you have described doesn't just happen to new nurses. I have been a nurse over 20 years and sometimes in report I get asked the most obscure question about a patient. If I don't know, I'll say "I don't know, let's both try to find that answer. Don't take it personally. I'll also give you a little hint....even us seasoned nurses don't know it all!
    It's really hard to deal with situations like this when you are a new nurse or even a student nurse or for that matter a cna. I respect nurses who have been in the field for a while because when it comes down to it- if we don't know something, we will need that nurse/nurses. On the other hand I understand and tend to agree with mel or someone who said ask them if they would like to continue report. That was great! Also skull had some good advice too! Even though you are a new nurse you should expect respect as well from your fellow coworkers- nurse or not. We are suppost to be nurses and care for others- not a power contest. It just makes me know what kind of nurse i am not.
  11. by   iwilldothis
    Quote from iwilldothis
    It's really hard to deal with situations like this when you are a new nurse or even a student nurse or for that matter a cna. I respect nurses who have been in the field for a while because when it comes down to it- if we don't know something, we will need that nurse/nurses. On the other hand I understand and tend to agree with mel or someone who said ask them if they would like to continue report. That was great! Also skull had some good advice too! Even though you are a new nurse you should expect respect as well from your fellow coworkers- nurse or not. We are suppost to be nurses and care for others- not a power contest. It just makes me know what kind of nurse i am not.
    I mean crb! that was great!
  12. by   iwilldothis
    Quote from crb613
    There are a few nurses where I work that enjoy doing stuff like that. No matter how well you have prepared & give report...its not enough. These nurses are known for their 20 q's at report.....some get really nervous when they know report will be to these nurses. They have been known to stop report make a big scene, & want you to go look it up in the chart. UH nooo I give what is needed not a detailed past medical hx. This happened to me once. I was very polite and said I do not know to the q....and no I won't look it up. I am giving you report and you can look it up if you like when we are finished...do you want the rest of report? Now if it was something that pertained to their immediate care/condition, & I had omitted it then yes I would....
    I love IT! GOOD HEAD ON YOUR SHOULDERS! gOOD for you. GO Kentucky! I am also from KY originally.
  13. by   TJ920
    i work with a lot of brand new nurses, both new hires and practicum students. in my years of nursing experience, i've found a lot of the new nurses come out of school with the attitude that they already know all there is to know. i know this doesn't describe everyone, certainly didn't describe me when i was new. i think the key is continuuing to be open minded about learning, because new nurses while have graduated are far from "done" learning. ask questions, stay positive... it's far too early in the game to develope a "better than you" attitude, which will affect your job performance in the long run. i think a lot of the timidness has to do with lack of confidence, which will only come with time. remember, eleanor roosevelt said it best when she said, "no one can make you feel inferior without your consent." very, very fine words to live by.
  14. by   iwilldothis
    I agree with the comment. No nurse is done learning, no matter how long you have been a nurse. Unfortunately, I feel there are many nurses who may feel intimidated by NEW nurses for fear of the new nurse doing a better job than them or making them feel bad for not doing their job like they USED to. Example, burnt OUT! Also medicine is changing all the time and new techniques are proven to work better. The new nurses may have learned these techniques in nrsg school and the nurse who has been a nurse for a while doesn't like the change. There are new nurses that seem to think they may know it all- and they will find out soon enough they don't! But I just think it's wrong to see a new nurse with confidence- and try to destroy that. There is a huge difference between confidence and thinking you know it all! If these nurses who have been nurses for a while have confidence in themselves they definitely would NOT be feeling this way about NEW nurses. AND they have to remember that these NEW nurses will one day be taking care of them! I believe it all goes by the experiences people have! Some good and some bad! New nurses have to ask for help and ask questions when needed, but that doesn't mean they are punching bags or a way for nurses who have been nurses a while to one up themselves. You can't control others or let them affect you- but you also have a right to stand up for yourself!! Always! RN-BSN ( for only three months) and going to school for acute care nurse practicioner and proud of it!

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