Probably looking for a new job - page 2

by amzyRN 3,096 Views | 18 Comments

So I moved several states away to take this job that I though would be a terrific learning experience plus I would be giving the facility an awesome RN. Well things haven't been exactly what I expected. Some things have been... Read More


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    My first job was in an acute care unit at a small rural facility...while the unit was named acute care, much of the patients' acuity there is quite low (all the high acuity ones were sent out to urban centres). At times it felt very much like a nursing home, with many of the patients there awaiting placement. Like you, I thought that I would lose my time management in a slower paced hospital...but I stuck it out for approximately one year, and I gained many new skills, including delegation, charge nurse experience, and improved on my "hands on" skills. While a slower hospital will not have the "rush" feeling, it is a great place to pick up many nursing skills and to learn new things. You WILL learn time management skills--I did. And I'm glad that I had that one year of experience as a foundation to my new job in the city!
    michelle126, joanna73, and amzyRN like this.
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    I also moved to a small town from a large city. The change in itself is a learning experience. Focus on the positives and ask your manager for new learning experiences as they arise. You don't "lose" time management skills just because you're in a smaller centre. Instead of worrying about that next job, focus on learning as much as you can right now. If you truly enjoy your coworkers, commit to putting in a solid 18 months- 2 years there. Too many new grads want to leave their first job too soon, IMO. Given the economy, you're best to keep the position and build a foundation.
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    Quote from amzyRN
    I posted the question for feedback and I'm very great full for all the replies! I'm just really worried about not learning what I need to for my next job. In this economy employers don't want to spend too much time training, so I'm worried that I will need a lot of orientation at my next job that employers will have the option of not giving me that because there will be someone who can easily take my place. I need to have some solid skills not just something that looks good on paper. The idea of trying to find another job per deim nearby makes sense. I will look into that option.
    You posed the question and received similar responses. Ultimately, it's your decision. However, anything less than one year does not count as experience, regardless of the environment. Be prepared that if you leave before the year, you are still considered a new grad in the eyes of hiring managers. Putting in a few months somewhere will still not count as experience. Given all the fact that many new grads remain unemployed for months, you really should focus on what you've got.
    cienurse and Meriwhen like this.
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    FYI- you may no longer be considered a new grad for 90% of new grad programs either. So you might not have enough experience for a staff nurse hospital position and may not be considered a new grad because of your experience. That is not a good position to be in by choice. I do hope you find what you are looking for. Just know it is wicked tough out here for everybody.
    Meriwhen, duskyjewel, and joanna73 like this.
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    I am "only" an aide, so I hope you will excuse me for commenting, but I think you are VASTLY underestimating how valuable good, supportive co-workers are. So many of us have our stress level increased by backbiting, sniping, politics, gossip, and just plain weirdness foisted upon us by coworkers. It can make going to work hell. You shouldn't undervalue the importance of a non-toxic work environment.
    cienurse, Meriwhen, Hygiene Queen, and 2 others like this.
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    Just wondering what type of pts you do get to see. I do skilled nursing/ rehab/ LTC nursing. I see alot of things and the pt types vary alot. post surgical day 2 hips and knees, cardiac rehab, extensive wound cares, trach, psych, respite/ hospice, tpn and multiple ivs, blood draws etc...the list can go on. On top of this, there is the management, delegation and other skills that you use.

    If you are attached to the hospital and you also work in the ER..what do you get to see?

    It is hard to find a place where you like your boss and coworkers, so i would consider staying and maybe looking for different learning opportunities that might be outside of the box..what about EMS? volunteer with them..could just be a few classes that you would need to take or get certified as an EMT to start and work your way up from there.
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    Quote from michelle126
    Just wondering what type of pts you do get to see. I do skilled nursing/ rehab/ LTC nursing. I see alot of things and the pt types vary alot. post surgical day 2 hips and knees, cardiac rehab, extensive wound cares, trach, psych, respite/ hospice, tpn and multiple ivs, blood draws etc...the list can go on. On top of this, there is the management, delegation and other skills that you use.

    If you are attached to the hospital and you also work in the ER..what do you get to see?

    It is hard to find a place where you like your boss and coworkers, so i would consider staying and maybe looking for different learning opportunities that might be outside of the box..what about EMS? volunteer with them..could just be a few classes that you would need to take or get certified as an EMT to start and work your way up from there.
    So far the bulk of my experience has been managing care of the skilled nursing home patients, residents at the facility. There has been 1 acute patient that had an exacerbation CHF, that has been 1 acute patient in 1 month. We haven't had any patients admitted for rehab, no post surgery patients. The ER patients have been mostly asthma, minor cuts, minor accidents. There have been a people in for IV infusions from the clinic in town that were referred to us. I've gotten to do a few IVs, and minor wound care. Most of what I do is manage care of the residents. I would like to be getting the type of experience you are getting, because I love that kind of stuff! I will look into what you suggested, thanks!
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    Is there a hospital in the area?

    Maybe you could get a PRN position or a float pool position there to get
    some experience on your days off from your full time job.
    Kathiegolden likes this.
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    I have worked in nursing homes most of my career. There are many things you can do to make it more challenging and also improve the quality of care your patients receive. Look into some of the policies. Are there things you can tweek to make it easier to get done, get more benefit for your efforts? Start groups, Alzheimers, Parkinson's, dementia etc.... there are always room for sharing and growing with these type of groups that you can involve your staff, patients, and their families. Start a rec group. Share hobbies and interests with co-workers and patients. Life is only as challenging as you want it to be!!


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