No Preceptor?

  1. I have graduated recently (7/07) and passed my LPN boards 2 weeks ago. I got hired right away and i have been working for 2 weeks going on 3. My problem is that for the first week, i have had 3-4 different trainers/preceptors, and the second week, i had a stable trainer, but she would leave me by myself thinking that i have gotten enough "shadowing/training" my 1st week. I really feel confused of who to ask help from because everybody seems to be doing their own thing. I dont feel confident because of the training that i am getting. what should i do?
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   csiln
    You'll probably get a better answer in the general nursing discussion section. I had a preceptor 5 days.Never got better, quit -- nursing altogether. May get brave some day. Good luck. I think the preceptor thing makes all the difference.
  4. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from sh0rtii
    I have graduated recently (7/07) and passed my LPN boards 2 weeks ago. I got hired right away and i have been working for 2 weeks going on 3. My problem is that for the first week, i have had 3-4 different trainers/preceptors, and the second week, i had a stable trainer, but she would leave me by myself thinking that i have gotten enough "shadowing/training" my 1st week. I really feel confused of who to ask help from because everybody seems to be doing their own thing. I dont feel confident because of the training that i am getting. what should i do?
    Talk to your nursing manager. I had much the same problems when I was a new RN going into an ICU environment. I had a different preceptor everyday which was a pain. Luckily, most everyone on my unit was open to any questions I had and I felt like they had my back. Ask, ask, ask questions when you have any. If that doesn't work, and talking to the manager doesn't work - I would look for a new job if you are not comfortable.
  5. by   sh0rtii
    I am really unhappy right now, but everyone else around me keeps on telling me how fortunate i am to have this job. i also have a hard time deciding if i should leave because my grad-mate who is now my co-worker helped me to get this job. i dont want to embarass her for me quitting way too soon. *sigh* Thanks for all the comments though!
  6. by   anne74
    First of all, "everyone" who is saying you're lucky to have this job isn't doing the job themselves - or at least they're not having the same experience you're having, with the rotating preceptors. It's very hard to progress with different preceptors, because none of them know where the previous one left off and everyone does things differently, so you get conflicting advice.

    I wouldn't throw in the towel yet - it sounds like your new preceptor just doesn't know what level you're at right now - so speak up - tell her to give you lots of close guidance and you'll let her know if you already know how to do something.

    The first person you go to for questions is your preceptor, and if she/he is busy just go ask another nurse. You just have to be assertive and not be afraid to ask. Since you're not asking, they assume you know what you're doing and they go about their business. It's dangerous for you not to ask for help, and most nurses are happy to help a new nurse. When they were new, they had to ask too.

    Plus, you've only been doing this for 3 weeks. You really won't start feeling confident for a few months at the very least, and still then you'll constantly be asking for help. That's just the life of a new nurse. It's not realistic to think you can just walk in there and be independent within a few weeks. That takes months and even years.

    Just go to your manager and/or preceptor and tell them the training you need. Every new nurse has different needs and different ways of learning, and they can't help you unless you tell them what you need. Good luck!
    Last edit by anne74 on Oct 3, '06

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