No More Bedside Nursing, I Quit! - page 4

I just recently graduated with my BSN in '04. i will be completing my 1st year this october working as a Registered Nurse. After 1 year working on the floor i have decided i'm going to quit bedside... Read More

  1. by   Nurseinthemaking
    Have you thought about Dialysis Nursing???
  2. by   Kaseyrn2b
    Quote from redred
    hi everyone-

    I recently began working as a new nurse on a Tele floor, 2 1/2 months ago. I have no clue what I am doing half the time. Thank God for my preceptor because I learning a lot from her, but I have no clue what I'm going to do when I'm on my own next month. I feel like I'm working as a servant instead of a nurse. some of these patient's think their in a hotel, which is absurd. A lot of theses patient's are self sufficient, but refuse to be a part od their rehabilitation. I know their is a lot responsibility in nursing, but school did not prepare me for this stuff. I hate bedside nursing I just wanted my med/surg exp. for a year. I will probably stay part-time after a year, but my first love is in psych which is what I have a degree in and I want to explore other avenues. I going to hang in there for this 1st year, but does anybody have other suggestions on what I can do?

    redred
    Wow...I am really reconsidering nursing school now. My degree is also in psych and I'm thinking even if I have to take a few grad classes and (yipes) the GRE to get in maybe I should just forgo NS and go right to get an MS in counseling. I was leaning towards Ns b/c of job security, I like science and the caring for people part, but there doesn't seem to be much caring allowed..too much other junk. I already have a job I hate (but pays well)that I can stand and keep by only working only 15 hrs/ week. I don't want to do that again! I want to enjoy what I do, even if I don't rake it in, and be able to stand working 30+ hrs/ week...Ugh...this is so confusing. Sorry to vent, thanks for listening

    Jen
  3. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from fab4fan
    It kind of bothers me when people rec. home health as some sort of "easier" option. Home health is very stressful, in a different way. You're out driving around, sometimes in terrible weather. Pts. don't always live in nice, neat homes. I've been in many places that were out and out disgusting.

    Expect to put a lot of wear and tear on your car, and not get compensated adequately for it. HH agencies are notorious for paying as little for mileage and wear and tear as they can get away with. Your car becomes your office. Trunk space? Prepare to have it filled to the brim with supplies (God love you if you ever get a flat and have to get the spare out!)

    Pts. come home very sick, and you'd be surprised what you're expected to deal with in a home. And there's not another nurse "just down the hall" to ask for a second opinion...you need to do a lot of problem solving on your own.

    The paperwork...think it's bad in a hospital? It's a thousand times worse in home care.

    Plus you usually have to take on call, so you could have put in a difficult 8-10h day, then have to get up at 0200 and go see a pt.

    No cakewalk, that's for sure.
    Ditto. I worked in home health for 18 years, and it is NO cakewalk, for sure. Besides having to do visits in homes which should have been condemned years before and having to put up with snakes, rats, roaches as well as alcoholic, neurotic and irresponsible family members, you had better hope that you WILL be able to problem-solve on your own, for you aren't going to get it from the agency. I actually had a supervisor hang up on me, after I was called to a patient's home to reinsert a Keofeed, which I had never worked with before. I wound up sending him to the E.R....and it was a good thing I did, for I found out afterwards that these can only be replaced under radiologic confirmation. Suppose I had tried to reinsert it and had punctured this guy's esophagus...or worse?? Nowadays these people are coming home with everything from wound vacs to Dobutamine drips and blood transufusions and as Fab4Fan says, they are SICKER than ever. And, as for the paperwork, mileage and being on call, you will get NO compassion from the home health agency you work for, either. It is just another form of disorganized chaos, which you do not need at this point in your life.
  4. by   icugirl33
    I recently graduated from a BSN program (5/05) and by my third day on the floor, was ready to head back to schhol. By the time I received my first paycheck, I reapplied and will be starting an ARNP, MSN program in 1/2006. I agree with everything the original poster wrote.
  5. by   Seasoned salt
    As a veteran of 30 years of Nursing on both the bedside and administrative level, I can tell you that you must never lose sight of the fact that you are the advocate for the patient. There is a shortage because no one wants to work so hard anymore. A degree is not an entitlement to "smooth sailing" unless you are just looking for short cuts. In this day and age, whether you have a union or not, you as a nurse can advocate for the benefit of patient safety , make management aware that the staffing level is dangerous. But do not abandon your role. When I started nursing we had 2 nurses for 35 patients. All charts and flow sheets had to be filled out and medications were given on time under penalty of suspension in between strict guidelines of patient care. There were no computers and certain technologies which exist now did not exist then. But we stuck it out, without breaks sometimes, without meals sometimes, but seeing the outcome and the patient satisfaction was a great reward, That is why I am who I am. You do not need to suffer inappropriate working conditions, but strive to change them for the benefit of those who follow your footsteps and your patients. Don't run away. If you run every time things do not work as you anticipated in healthcare, you will never stop running.
  6. by   Wsmith16
    Come from a family of nurses & been a nurse for a few months and am looking for my way out. I love nursing--I believe that alot of new nurses simply will not stay at the bedside. Too much abuse from families, patients & administration. We are being pulled in all different directions. I don't want end up bitter hence am going back to school ASAP. bedside nursing/
  7. by   Wsmith16
    Quote from Seasoned salt
    As a veteran of 30 years of Nursing on both the bedside and administrative level, I can tell you that you must never lose sight of the fact that you are the advocate for the patient. There is a shortage because no one wants to work so hard anymore. A degree is not an entitlement to "smooth sailing" unless you are just looking for short cuts. In this day and age, whether you have a union or not, you as a nurse can advocate for the benefit of patient safety , make management aware that the staffing level is dangerous. But do not abandon your role. When I started nursing we had 2 nurses for 35 patients. All charts and flow sheets had to be filled out and medications were given on time under penalty of suspension in between strict guidelines of patient care. There were no computers and certain technologies which exist now did not exist then. But we stuck it out, without breaks sometimes, without meals sometimes, but seeing the outcome and the patient satisfaction was a great reward, That is why I am who I am. You do not need to suffer inappropriate working conditions, but strive to change them for the benefit of those who follow your footsteps and your patients. Don't run away. If you run every time things do not work as you anticipated in healthcare, you will never stop running.
    On the contraire maybe she should run away. Maybe if new nurses run-- administratuin will see that there is a problem & maybe it will get fixed. Instead of putting up with it maybe we should say enough is enough. Pt safety is at risk, our license is at risk. We need to say enough to poor staffing conditions. Why must nurses be the martyrs. Administration is aware of what is going on there just not doing anything about it. Maybe we as nurses need to be more vocal about nurse to pt ratios. By doing so the patients will benefit more in the end.
  8. by   FLmomof5
    Since this thread is about 4 yrs old....maybe you should start a new one!
  9. by   CoffeeGeekRN
    In this economy to run may not be an option.
  10. by   southpacificRN
    Years after the first post...it still applies.
    My mind tells me to "suck it up" and do the job I was trained to do. But my spirit is drained.
    Yes, patients are sicker...but I have also witnessed in the last five to ten years a big shift to patients seeming entitled, as if they are on full service vacation, with little to no appreciation or acknowledgement that you helped keep them alive. But that is not the issue I find the most frustration with. It is my fellow nurses. When I first started in the hospital setting, I most enjoyed the collaboration, the "two minds are better than one" aspect. But now more often, it is attack from fellow nurses that erodes at my joy for nursing. Shift to shift bickering, pointing fingers, etc. I have witnessed a unit manager, under questioning from an MD, throw her staff under the bus, literally say, "well it wasn't me". She did not support her staff. I have witnessed a new grad be degraded and threatened to have her license taken away! Besides places like this where we are anonymous and can give each other words of encouragement, we have no support from those around us...sad.
  11. by   1pinknurse
    I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Utilization Review Nurse. Insurance Companies have Utilization Management Depts with LVN's & RN's for med nec issues. You are basically doing the foot work for the Dr's on staff. I am an LVN & working for a major insurance company as a Utilization Review Grievance & Appeal Nurse. FYI....experience is not usually required. The down fall is no direct patient contact or care but most of these nurses work from home. So, if sitting on your tail all day to review paperwork, being on production & sitting in a cubicle sounds fun then it may be for you. Personally, I am looking high & low for a nursing job that requires me to be active by providing direct patient care. I like caring for people & it gives me a feeling like no other. I worked in the insurance industry for 12 years, so I am used to it but when I left, I never looked back then here I am again. I had to do what I need for a paycheck. If I could switch with you, I would.
  12. by   samirish
    Maybe try case management?

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