New Nurses

  1. 11 Realize this:

    You're not allowed to know anything, but at the same time, you're stupid if you don't always know what to do.

    Oh, and that old saying, "there's no such thing as a stupid question..."? Well, it really all depends on who you ask.
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  3. Visit  Anoetos profile page

    About Anoetos

    Anoetos has '2' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Nursing'. From 'Metro Detroit'; Joined Sep '09; Posts: 775; Likes: 655.

    16 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Hygiene Queen profile page
    6
    Have you had a bad day?
  5. Visit  Anoetos profile page
    1
    Not really, for the much larger part, my experience has been positive, my co-workers helpful and supportive...but...there have been exceptions.
    mmm333 likes this.
  6. Visit  myelin profile page
    3
    wow your post is a bit obscure, so here's a haiku:

    Strange words said by nurse -
    Cannot make sense of it. Seems
    afraid of new blood?
  7. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    0
    What do you mean "not allowed to know anything"?

    Quote from Anoetos
    Realize this:

    You're not allowed to know anything, but at the same time, you're stupid if you don't always know what to do.

    Oh, and that old saying, "there's no such thing as a stupid question..."? Well, it really all depends on who you ask.
  8. Visit  SHGR profile page
    0
    Quote from Anoetos
    Realize this:

    You're not allowed to know anything, but at the same time, you're stupid if you don't always know what to do.

    Oh, and that old saying, "there's no such thing as a stupid question..."? Well, it really all depends on who you ask.
    If you have a micromanager, this never gets better.
  9. Visit  sckimrn profile page
    4
    All of us were new nurses at one time or another...it gets better....errr with time. Just don't let anyone put you down. You earned the right to call yourself a nurse.
    T-Bird78, rhondaa83, LotusRN1972, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  proudauntie415 profile page
    4
    Was nice reading this, not alone being the new nurse on the block I guess

    And don't forget, "please, ask questions of your preceptor for anything" Then later, you hear them say you don't seem confident in your own choices

    Pfft, I was confident but thought I would just run my intervention across you to see if it is policy here at this facility!
    Last edit by proudauntie415 on Oct 23, '12 : Reason: double word
    Tree5981, BrendaH84, Sweeti738, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  Anoetos profile page
    2
    Quote from ColleenRN2B
    What do you mean "not allowed to know anything"?
    Example: nurses are discussing a patient. The new nurse expresses an opinion, or conjectures about the patient based upon what he or she has learned in school. The nurse is trying out his or her critical thinking skills. The older nurses either ignore or dismiss this new nurse's contribution.

    Now, here's the thing, this doesn't crush me, but it irritates me. I have seen numerous cases where "experienced nurses" have been wrong about things. Far too often though, they never learn that they were wrong, either their denial is too strong, or there is just no apparatus for the nurse to learn from their mistakes unless patient safety is compromised, so if it's just a lapse in thought, it gets slid by. The opinion of a new nurse may be just what is needed. It seems to me that their closeness to the classroom might be useful.

    All it takes is a thoughtful nod and an acknowledgment.

    In fairness, I do usually see this, but sometimes I don't and it just seems petty.
    Psychtrish39 and simplelc like this.
  12. Visit  echoRNC711 profile page
    4
    I do understand where you are coming from.In nursing school an action is either right or wrong and that is the thinking. My approach as a new nurse was I wanted to get it right and was looking for a formula or perfect order so that I could do things correctly. What I learned is there are many ways of doing things "right ".You will get to develop your practice ,but right now, learn from people who are already doing what you need to learn. Get past the right/wrong mindset and look more at solution or getting the job done.
    You will discover that some things you learned in nursing school were about being "the perfect nurse " but have no practical merit.
    Accept that while you may have knowledge you do not have experience. Is it a difficult role on orientation? Absolutely, Yes! Some preceptors love questions,input others don't. This can be because they either are too busy already (teaching you plus a pt load )or they are not interested .If speaking up is not helping you,then stop doing it. I know that seems harsh. It is not how I personally like to precept.However,you are being judged right now. This is not the time to make waves. Look to an earlier post today of a nurse let go right after orientation for "not being a good fit ". Start trying to see the things that you and your preceptor are doing right. Focus on the positive. Orientation is short don't allow power struggles to get in the way of you getting the most out of it. Every unit pretty much has at least one person who likes to teach,befriend them. The phrase "but in nursing school" gets old fast,can be felt by some as inflammatory or threatening if the preceptor doesn't know the answer. Preceptors are regular nurses many of which didn't ask for the job.Lastly while I don't think you should pander to a senior nurse,be respectful of their experience. Do not underestimate the value of politeness (and I am not suggesting you are not ). I personally find myself wanting to help polite people more.
    BrendaH84, rd1186, mitral, and 1 other like this.
  13. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from Anoetos
    The opinion of a new nurse may be just what is needed. It seems to me that their closeness to the classroom might be useful.
    *** The problem is that the nursing school class room and clinical experience has very little to do with actual nursing. I am reminded of the recent graduate of a direct entry masters program who when faced with a patient with declining SPO2 left the room to call the physician to obtain an order to place the patient on O2. It took approximatly 20 min from the time she noted the declining SPO2 and when she actuallly placed the patient (order for it securly in the computer) on O2. This turned into a rapid response and when I asked why she didn't place the patient on O2 then call to update the physician and get the O2 order she said "well O2 requires a doctors order". This is the correct nursing school answer but not the real world answer.
    This particular RN was obviously very bright and has since become a competent and skilled RN but that took a couple years of hands on experience.
    echoRNC711 likes this.
  14. Visit  nyteshade profile page
    2
    Sorry OP that you felt this way about certain people where you work. Nursing should be more about being able to run a problem by a co-worker or two without judgement.
    Hygiene Queen and PMFB-RN like this.
  15. Visit  mariebailey profile page
    1
    I can relate. I don't think "being a good fit" trumps fine-tuning your critical-thinking skills by participating actively in discussions on patient care issues. Also, you likely do have something to offer, or you wouldn't have graduated, passed the NCLEX, been hired on that unit, etc. I know how it feels to have your ideas dismissed arbitrarily, and I suspect 2 things may, from time to time, cause other nurses to respond this way toward rookies: pride and the tendency to be territorial.
    BrendaH84 likes this.


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