New Grad will be 5 months pregnant.

  1. Hello everyone. I am writing about my peer K.C. She will be a new bsn grad in May 2006. She just found out that she was pregnant. So she will be about 5 months pregnant when she graduates. I was wondering if she will be eligible as a brand new hospital employee to get maternity leave, paid or unpaid. I mean they cant deny her maternity leave right? She does not have a job yet but will it be smart if she started applying for jobs now, get hired, and then tell them shes pregnant after. Or should she just be straight forward with future employers. She fears that hospitals will not hire her because she will be 5 months pregnant. Please help. Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from NYC44
    Hello everyone. I am writing about my peer K.C. She will be a new bsn grad in May 2006. She just found out that she was pregnant. So she will be about 5 months pregnant when she graduates. I was wondering if she will be eligible as a brand new hospital employee to get maternity leave, paid or unpaid. I mean they cant deny her maternity leave right? She does not have a job yet but will it be smart if she started applying for jobs now, get hired, and then tell them shes pregnant after. Or should she just be straight forward with future employers. She fears that hospitals will not hire her because she will be 5 months pregnant. Please help. Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks.
    Hello,

    I am sure that this will vary based on location. Try posting on your state's forum also. Good luck
  4. by   KatieBell
    Another poster is a new grad and Expecting (Aneroo) and I recall her situation did not include maternity leave or FMLA- because you must be employed for a certain length of time prior before some of that kicks in.

    My friend was expecting at her graduation. She had the baby and took her own leave and then went to work. It takes some time to get permission to test for NCLEX. In my case, I graduated on May 20th- and even with assistance from the school- the first test date I got was in JULY. So she would be looking at starting to work at 7 months. Especially as most new grad programs start in July/August. Many new grad orientations are 13 weeks- 3 months so If she can not work immediately after graduation- she may not even have time to complete orientatio.

    I think I'd be honest- many employers would not look kindly on the deception, especially as she does know.
  5. by   sjrn85
    To qualify for FMLA, you must have been employed for one year and worked at least 1,250 hrs that year, so she would not qualify.

    I think she should be honest. It may seem easier to say nothing now, but it could cause hard feelings down the road.
  6. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from sjrn85
    To qualify for FMLA, you must have been employed for one year and worked at least 1,250 hrs that year, so she would not qualify.

    I think she should be honest. It may seem easier to say nothing now, but it could cause hard feelings down the road.
    I too agree she should be honest. Also, should consider going to work after giving birth.

    Best wishes to her.
  7. by   analee23
    I had major foot surgery right after boards... was on strong pain meds and unable to work, My husband and I then moved about 1 1/2 months after I was cleared to work (cross-country). In the interim (for that month and a half) I was able to find a job at a pediatric office where I basically gave shots all day, every day. Didn't get as much money, but was good experience. I am now starting my nursing career in a hospital and doing my fellowship/preceptorship/whatever you wanna call it with the grads from Jan. (well, kinda... I'm working with a preceptor til it starts in Feb.)

    So, basically, what I'm sayin is she can work at a temp job like I did until the baby is born and then take time off (if she's not too worried about pay during that time). If she is... I had a friend that was 3 months pregnant and graduation who got a job at a NICU and they gave her time off... I think it's due to it being a magnet hospital?? They treat there nurses VERY well and were very understanding. Being honest is the key!
  8. by   meownsmile
    My facility has hired 2 that were pregnant, went through orientation, just in time to be off and have the baby. They came back got a couple weeks more orientation and are doing fine. I have to agree, idoubt she would be covered by FMLA because its a pre-existing condition prior to employment.

    Just a suggestion though,, so many tend to want to wait to take their NCLEX until "after" the baby comes. She shouldnt wait. Take NCLEX as soon as possible after you graduate.
  9. by   sjrn85
    Pre-existing conditions have nothing to do with FMLA. You can have a pre-x and still qualify, but you must have met the 1 year & 1,250 hr requirement.

    A hospital may choose to allow an employee who does not meet FMLA criteria time off, but they are not legally obligated to do so. Once someone has qualified for FMLA, however, the employer may not penalize the employee.

    There is a limit to FMLA, however. Once you've exhausted FMLA time (12 weeks) the employer is no longer obligated to hold a job for you.
  10. by   Jo Dirt
    I was four months pregnant when I graduated from LPN school. I didn't tell the nursing home where I went to work as soon as I was licensed, but they did not get upset after hiring me and finding out I was pregnant. I worked up until the night I had the baby.
  11. by   Boston-RN
    I don't know if it differs from state to state but FMLA is for any medical condition for any person. It stands for Family Medical Leave Act and it's put in place to make sure someone doesn't lose their job for taking to many days off for a specific illness. You may not get paid for it but you're still allowed to take the time allowed
  12. by   RNin08
    Quote from MAnurseHopeful
    You may not get paid for it but you're still allowed to take the time allowed
    Be careful here though, not every worker/company in the USA is covered. There are some qualifiers--such as company size and length of employment.

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