New grad job woes - question (long)

  1. 0
    I do realize the job market is tough right now and employers have their pick of whoever they want to hire, yet I can't help but feel perplexed ever since I started looking for work. I have interviewed multiple times at the facility where I want to work, and they never hire me. What am I doing wrong? I just want to know why they are passing me over so that I might have some idea of what I need to work on or try to do better, but I'm afraid to ask because it might sound too desperate.

    I dress nicely and modestly. I take baths. I'm not insane, I don't think! I don't eat puppies in my spare time. I am quiet, so I probably don't come off with a lot of pizazz. I am almost 42. I try to play up my strengths - hard worker, fast learner, reliable, will be there on time when I'm supposed to be, team player, etc. But I always get shut out.

    In the most recent interview I went to, which was a group interview, we were told that "most of us" would get hired for one of the 2 floors they were interviewing for, and if not, they would pass along our name to the nurse manager who was still hiring on another floor. Well, I didn't get chosen, and I had already interviewed and heard nothing back from the nurse manager who was supposedly still hiring on the other floor. Sigh. I wanted to tell them, oh please don't pass me over and send me to the other nurse manager I already interviewed with! But that would have sounded too desperate. It really hurt to get my hopes up over the "most of us would get hired" line, after already having been rejected so many times, only to be rejected yet again.

    I just don't get it! I graduated in May, got my RN in June, and still no work as a nurse. I'm beginning to feel that I will never be a working nurse, just a nurse in name only.
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  3. 14 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    It doesn't look desperate to ask why they keep passing you over. ASK!! even if for some reason it did seem desperate, ask anyway. You are desperate and who cares? If they see that you really want to work there, maybe they will sit up and take notice.
    Just a thought..why do you want to work at this facility? Have you ever mentioned it in an interview? Do you know the history and values?

    When I was looking for a job 2 yrs ago, I really wanted to work at this one hospital. It belonged to a large group of Catholic facilities and they were going to open a new hospital 20 miles away from me. I saw those architectural prints and knew I had to work there.
    I did get an interview, (and told them why I wanted to where there) and when they passed me up because they were looking for ICU only, not med surg. I begged (yes, begged) them to reconsider. I told them I was meant to work at XYZ, because I lived their values in my nursing. I know it sounds extremely corny, but they 'found' a spot for me 3 weeks later.
    pinkchris2000, wannabecnl, and Kringe38 like this.
  5. 1
    Sometimes it takes a while to process paperwork... Background check, working with HR, checking on Licensure, CPR, etc. I also made sure tom express what shifts and FTEs I am most interested in taking, but also assured them I was flexible for shift, etc.

    I want to assure you, although I am sure you are well aware, you are not alone. I graduated in May and was fortunate to have jobs lined up. There are a handful of us out of 82 that have started. The rest are trying to get interviews, etc... And yes, many of them are not your traditional post high school college student.

    I think it is great you are getting that many interviews!! Chin up, I'm sure something will turn in your favor!
    Kringe38 likes this.
  6. 2
    I'm a new grad, too, so I am certainly not an expert on this topic, but I have been pretty lucky in my job search so far (gotten 2 offers, waiting to see if I get a third this week, which is the one I REALLY WANT!), so maybe I can tell you how I've been approaching the interviews I've been on? First of all, I think you need to stop worrying about appearing "desperate" and focus on letting them see enthusiasm. From what I've seen in the managers that have interviewed me, what they really want to see is that you really, really want the job! We all are team players, responsible, will show up on time, are hard workers, fast learners, etc. What sets someone apart, I think, is showing that you have a spark and are passionate about nursing and passionate in your desire to work for them in that particular position! So even if you are natually on the quiet side, maybe you can find ways to communicate that drive and enthusiasm. Make sure that you let them know in no uncertain terms that you not only have what it takes to do the job, but you WANT the job, and you are going to be a ROCKSTAR in that particular position. Practice answering some of the typical questions that you get asked. Work on selling yourself! As long as you are worrying about appearing desparate, I am afraid you will be holding back, and holding back is the exact opposite of what hiring managers seem to want. It may be uncomfortable for you at first, but I honestly think that my shameless enthusiasm is what has gotten me job offers so far. I hope this helps!! GOOD LUCK!!
    JRP1120, RN and Kringe38 like this.
  7. 0
    It's been several weeks now with no more interviews. Would they think I was weird if I called them back now at this late date and asked them to reconsider, or ask if there was anything I could do to improve? I am so tempted to call. I guess what I mean by "seeming desperate" is that they will think that a) I was rejected by other interviewers so there must be something wrong with me and they should reject me, too, or b) I might be a resentful crazy who is going to come shoot up the place because they didn't hire me. I just don't want them to think I am some kind of nut.

    I get to the end of an interview, and they tell me they have other interviewees to talk to, and right then I get the feeling that I have not made any impression. I have practiced common questions with one of my classmates, and I thought I had gotten together some awesome answers...but no go. I had a really good one for the "if you were an animal, what would you be?" question, too.

    I am indeed very reserved, and it feels unnatural to me to just walk into some stranger's office and wax poetic about why I want to work there. I've told them why - it's a teaching hospital with lots of different specialties, I've been there in clinicals and have seen the teamwork and camaraderie amongst the staff, stuff like that. Is there something wrong with my answer? Some way to say it more convincingly? I'm just so confused...I feel like I have to go in there ready to perform a Broadway number with lots of singing and dancing or they won't believe I want to work there! Many of my classmates have gotten jobs, so it's not like there aren't jobs in my area...just not for me, apparently! /pity party

    There can't be any answer they haven't heard. They all ask the same questions over and over.
  8. 2
    I just got a rejection (just for an online application) and i wrote the people and thanked them for the rejection email and asked if they could give me some feedback on how to be make my self a more competitive applicant. I expected to get an email back at most but actually got a phone call where they had actually re-reviewed my resume and gave me a few pointers! I would definitely ask.
    WillowNMe and Kringe38 like this.
  9. 5
    Quote from Kringe38
    I take baths. I'm not insane, I don't think! I don't eat puppies in my spare time. I am quiet, so I probably don't come off with a lot of pizazz. I am almost 42. I try to play up my strengths - hard worker, fast learner, reliable, will be there on time when I'm supposed to be, team player, etc. But I always get shut out.

    I don't have any suggestions or advice, and I am sorry you are having a difficult time finding a job. FWIW, I would hire you, you seem to have a great sense of humor. I have had a crappy week, my daughter set my kitchen on fire (accident) and I really needed a laugh - the fact that you don't eat puppies in your spare time is a positive.
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    Do you have the email addresses of any of these managers? Or know their mailing addresses? Because you truly are a good writer (I can "hear" your voice in your writing), and you seem to have a good sense of humor and a way with words, so maybe you'd do well with a follow up email or mailing them a cover letter and your resume again. In the letter or email, I think you should say that you want to follow up because although you interviewed and did not recieve an offer initially, this hospital remains your absolute first choice as far as potential employers go and you KNOW you could really make a positive contribution if employed there. I think they'd view the fact that you followed up as a really good sign! I think your reasons for wanting to work there sound good, but it might sell it more if you said "I had clinicals here, and after getting the chance to experience the culture of this hospital and see the teamwork and camaraderie of the nurses, I knew without a doubt that this is where I wanted to work". It's the same message, but with a little more punch to it, I think. Does that make sense?
    JRP1120, RN and Kringe38 like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from SydneyJo1
    I think your reasons for wanting to work there sound good, but it might sell it more if you said "I had clinicals here, and after getting the chance to experience the culture of this hospital and see the teamwork and camaraderie of the nurses, I knew without a doubt that this is where I wanted to work". It's the same message, but with a little more punch to it, I think. Does that make sense?
    That does make sense. I see what you mean. I do have a couple of their e-mail addresses. I e-mailed one right after my interview with her and got no reply at all. There is one who seems very nice and might answer me. I don't have any contact info for any of the others. It's difficult for me to see things from their point of view, what they would like to see/hear, their reasons for asking the same questions...over and over... After a while, I started getting really frustrated because I feel like I have a lot to offer but no way to differentiate myself from others, no idea of what I am doing or saying that is turning them off, etc.
  12. 2
    I've always taken the approach of why the employer needs to hire me. As in "I'm so amazing blah, blah, blah." It has seemed to work thus far landing me 5 job offers as a new grad in a very saturated market. Employers want the know why you have chosen their hospital, but what they're really looking for why you'd would be an asset to them. It's a fine line between exuding confidence, and reeking arrogance. Just think if you were the hiring manager would you prefer someone who was excited and assertive, or someone passive and willing? Don't give up
    SydneyJo1 and Kringe38 like this.


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