New Grad & Scheduling Difficulties - page 2

I’m a recent new grad. I had several interviews and was offered positions in all of them. I chose a particular specialty area that I love and I was so excited for the opportunity to be a part of this... Read More

  1. by   Apples&Oranges
    Is this real life? You guys are seriously entertaining this brandy new person's complaints about having to conform to a preceptor's schedule? For 3 months?

    I. Just. Can't.

    Let me get this straight- I am kind enough to slow my entire (already 13-14 hour) day down, come in early every morning, stay late every night (while the new nurse gives a tortuously looonnng and ineffective report - hey, that's cool, we all had to learn somehow) while still having ultimate responsibility for MY patients, run interference between the new (and usually easily offended) nurse and the residents, monitor techs, cath lab, MRI, etc., have constant meetings with the Unit Director and Supervisor about how my preceptee is doing, for ZERO extra pay, while managing 4-5 really freaking sick patients, often mentoring between 1 and 4 nursing students at the same time.... and you are going to complain about the SCHEDULE??

    The arrogance and entitlement I read here is astounding. It would literally never have occurred to me to ask to change the schedule that my preceptors were working during my first orientation. Or during any other. It just would not even have occurred to my brain that that was a thought to entertain for a second.

    Unreal.

    Next thing we're going to read is that she's upset she didn't get a breakfast, lunch and "afternoon" break. I absolutely can't.
  2. by   203bravo
    I tend to agree with Apples&Oranges.. however, if this is the position that you really wanted and based on the information that you had at the time you turned down other job offers.. I really don't understand why you can't make this work for three short months. You are thinking that you will spend less time with family while in reality you may be able to spend more time with family...

    You say that your family works 8-5 schedule during the week... well you have an entire week off to spend with them - do any of them have a scheduled lunch break where you would meet them? What do they do from 5pm till bedtime --- there are hours that you get to spend with family.. you could help out by getting up early and making breakfast so that by they have time to spend with you before departing for work... Be creative during these few months.

    Best of luck.
  3. by   DolceVita
    Congratulations on your new position. I strongly suggest that you take steps now to seek support for the next few weeks. People have made great suggestions. You got a good job as a new grad and I would consider cultivating an attitude of gratitude. This same attitude will assist you in the future.

    I beg you to try not to meet every suggestion with a reason it won't work. What a great opportunity for you to forge new relationships at work or get in touch with two or three friends from nursing school. Take up yoga and get massages.

    Jeepers I was so relieved not to have my nose firmly planted in a book post graduation.

    Best new nurse advice I was given...show up (early) and shut up. When tempted to complain...revert to part two of the statement. I realize this seems a bit less than loving. Apparently I can take that sort of remark and not get all upset. Some get all sensitive.

    You'll be fine. Good luck.
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Apples&Oranges
    Is this real life? You guys are seriously entertaining this brandy new person's complaints about having to conform to a preceptor's schedule? For 3 months?

    I. Just. Can't.

    Let me get this straight- I am kind enough to slow my entire (already 13-14 hour) day down, come in early every morning, stay late every night (while the new nurse gives a tortuously looonnng and ineffective report - hey, that's cool, we all had to learn somehow) while still having ultimate responsibility for MY patients, run interference between the new (and usually easily offended) nurse and the residents, monitor techs, cath lab, MRI, etc., have constant meetings with the Unit Director and Supervisor about how my preceptee is doing, for ZERO extra pay, while managing 4-5 really freaking sick patients, often mentoring between 1 and 4 nursing students at the same time.... and you are going to complain about the SCHEDULE??

    The arrogance and entitlement I read here is astounding. It would literally never have occurred to me to ask to change the schedule that my preceptors were working during my first orientation. Or during any other. It just would not even have occurred to my brain that that was a thought to entertain for a second.

    Unreal.

    Next thing we're going to read is that she's upset she didn't get a breakfast, lunch and "afternoon" break. I absolutely can't.
    I absolutely agree. Three months is just a tiny speck of time. If an adult (and presumably by the time you finish nursing school and pass the NCLEX, you're an adult) cannot figure out how to separate from her family enough to make it through three months without spending weekends with them, that's a huge opportunity for growth. We're talking about parents, aren't we? We're not talking about not seeing your children for three months?

    I have a colleague whose adult child became a nurse and moved to a city about two hours away and was home every single time she had a day off. The colleague said "I've been waiting years to have an empty nest so I could go out and do things I've been putting off for years . . . but she keeps coming BACK!" When you grow up, you separate from your family of origin. That's the natural order of things.

    If you must, visit on your days off. See your family when they're off work in the evening. If it's important to them to see YOU, they'll make the time.
  5. by   pmabraham
    Quote from Apples&Oranges
    Is this real life? You guys are seriously entertaining this brandy new person's complaints about having to conform to a preceptor's schedule? For 3 months?
    I agree with just about everything you wrote. 3 months is an extremely short period of time, and the opening poster didn't take into account what a good preceptor goes through in order to precept. They only thought about themselves and what they believe they are "entitled" to receive whether it is earned or not earned. What I don't agree with is the presumption that we nurses do not earn or deserve our meal break (I did not use plural on purpose); that's something we do earn and deserve.
  6. by   not.done.yet
    This isn't going how you expected and you feel blindsided. You are up in arms because it isn't what you envisioned and the idea of not having life as you are used to it being makes you panic, as does the concern about your depression. I get it.

    Here's your situation in more blunt terms. "I want an acute care hospital job, which is more rare for new grads every day" check. "I want the specialty of my choice" check. "I want a nice, long, structured orientation process with an experienced preceptor willing to take me on" check. "I want to have plenty of time off to be with my family" check. I only want to work every other weekend. check. I want my three month orientation process to tailor itself to my preferred schedule. crickets.......

    This is the first of many things that will not go as expected as a nurse, and in terms of what those things may be, this is as mild as it gets. Adjust your sails young explorer. You can do this. You don't want to. Got it. Sometimes we have to do hard things. You have gotten great advice here. Go be with your family on your days off. Be at work on your days at work. OR....give up the job to someone who wants it. It really is that simple. You would be throwing away a really good, enviable new grad job because they won't cow to your scheduling demands for your first three months. Think about that for a second.

    Best of luck. Only you can decide whether to make this work. Not making it work equates to not keeping the job. The decision is yours...unless you make a big big deal out of this at work. Then it is very likely the decision will be taken out of your hands.
    Last edit by not.done.yet on Aug 24
  7. by   Just.Blessed.RN
    I absolutely understand your frustration! I am currently trying to decide between multiple job offers since I already have my 2 years of night shift Med/Surg nursing under my belt. So I would be upset if I picked one job over the others and was not made aware of weird orientation schedule!! But because you are a new nurse, having a great preceptor is PRICELESS!!! You can learn the right or wrong habits quickly, so having the best help is key. I pray you can make it work for you, especially since the job fits all of your wants. Sending you hugs and love!!!
  8. by   Apples&Oranges
    "I asked if there was any way to change this and my educator flat out said no and then she said, “we’ll talk later.” I did not get the chance to talk to her last week"

    OP, while I realize that my initial response may have come off as a little harsh, and I do apologize for that, (I had just had my newest preceptee try and do exactly what you are trying to do, and it was NOT taken well by ANY of the nursing staff, supervisor, Unit Director... in fact, we were discussing how to rescind her offer without breaking the employment agreement) I stand by everything I wrote.

    You are being given an opportunity here. It is your choice whether or not you take it. Let me try and rephrase a bit - you need this unit much more than they need you. New grads are, almost literally, a dime a dozen. If I left my specialty job tomorrow, there would be over 100 new grads begging for the chance to snatch it up. I'm not under any illusion that I am a special snowflake. Yes, I have a couple years of critical care experience, critical thinking and charge points built up, but I am quickly and easily replaceable by many someones who can learn to do my job in 6 months and are willing to do it for 8$/hr less.

    It is not in your unit/hospital/system's best interest to cater to you...it is in your best interest to cater to them - there are most definitely experienced nurses in your area who would be thrilled to take that position with not one word of complaint or drama. And wouldn't DARE ask for a weekend day off.

    The fact that your manager put you off when you asked to discuss scheduling during preceptorship implies to me that she was at such a loss for words at your arrogance for asking that she simply needed time to regroup, discuss this unreasonable request with the preceptor and other established nurses on the unit, and maybe HR. It wouldn't surprise me if no new grad had ever asked this before.

    Think very carefully about your next move, and the way you want the next conversation you have with anyone on this unit to go. I really do wish you the best of luck with this position moving forward.
  9. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Apples&Oranges
    "I asked if there was any way to change this and my educator flat out said no and then she said, “we’ll talk later.” I did not get the chance to talk to her last week"

    OP, while I realize that my initial response may have come off as a little harsh, and I do apologize for that, (I had just had my newest preceptee try and do exactly what you are trying to do, and it was NOT taken well by ANY of the nursing staff, supervisor, Unit Director... in fact, we were discussing how to rescind her offer without breaking the employment agreement) I stand by everything I wrote.

    You are being given an opportunity here. It is your choice whether or not you take it. Let me try and rephrase a bit - you need this unit much more than they need you. New grads are, almost literally, a dime a dozen. If I left my specialty job tomorrow, there would be over 100 new grads begging for the chance to snatch it up. I'm not under any illusion that I am a special snowflake. Yes, I have a couple years of critical care experience, critical thinking and charge points built up, but I am quickly and easily replaceable by many someones who can learn to do my job in 6 months and are willing to do it for 8$/hr less.

    It is not in your unit/hospital/system's best interest to cater to you...it is in your best interest to cater to them - there are most definitely experienced nurses in your area who would be thrilled to take that position with not one word of complaint or drama. And wouldn't DARE ask for a weekend day off.

    The fact that your manager put you off when you asked to discuss scheduling during preceptorship implies to me that she was at such a loss for words at your arrogance for asking that she simply needed time to regroup, discuss this unreasonable request with the preceptor and other established nurses on the unit, and maybe HR. It wouldn't surprise me if no new grad had ever asked this before.

    Think very carefully about your next move, and the way you want the next conversation you have with anyone on this unit to go. I really do wish you the best of luck with this position moving forward.
    You said it well, and oh-so-rightly. The only thing with which I disagree is the line "It wouldn't surprise me if no new grad had ever asked this before." Trust me, they have. And had their fathers call to threaten my manager if she didn't comply. That didn't go well for the new grad in question. The documentation started immediately.

    I fear that the OP may have already poisoned the well at her workplace. Maybe not; maybe she can still turn it around, but it's going to be very difficult.
  10. by   tacticool
    Quote from 02468
    I’m a recent new grad. I had several interviews and was offered positions in all of them. I chose a particular specialty area that I love and I was so excited for the opportunity to be a part of this unit. During my interview I was told that I was required to work at least 1 weekend shift a pay period, which was no problem. As a new grad I prepared myself to work some weekends and most holidays.

    I was told after orientation that I would have 3 months with a preceptor. Then I was told that my preceptor only works weekends. I asked if there was any way to change this and my educator flat out said no and then she said, “we’ll talk later.” I did not get the chance to talk to her last week, but I really need to speak with her about my schedule next week. I just don’t know how to go about doing it.

    I went through the pros of this and the only one I could find or that anyone brought up is that I get more money. Unfortunately that’s not enough for me. Working weekends only, for 3 months means that I would not get to see my family or my boyfriend for 3 months, as everyone works during the week and live in different cities. I do not mind working weekend shifts or if I’m even scheduled an entire weekend. I’m just conflicted about every weekend for 3 months.

    I feel lost because I turned down a lot of positions for this one and I really want to be here. However, my family is my support system. They are my stress relief and I’m worried that with my history of depression I won’t do well. If I would have known this information I probably would have accepted a different position, especially since I seem to be the only one that has this particular schedule (there are quite a few of us new grads on the unit).

    Has anyone else had scheduling difficulty like this and how did you handle it? How should I approach my educator? She’s actually difficult to even find because she is very busy and I haven’t really gotten to sit down with her to discuss anything. I would appreciate any advice.
    Do not confuse the working weekends one shift a pay period with working while being precepted, apples and oranges. The one weekend a pay period is AFTER you successfully complete your preceptorship. If not being happy with the job you really wanted because of a temporary schedule change after saying you really "want to be here" makes me question if you really do "want to be here"
  11. by   RNxICUx15
    Becoming a nurse often means entering the "Adult" world, and that often means learning how to get on in the world with a new/different type of support system. It sometimes means becoming more dependent on oneself instead of others. Before making a drastic and irreversible mistake, give very careful consideration to what your priorities are right now AND in the near and not-too-distant future, as well.

    When I graduated in 1996, I was the valedictorian, won this award, great GPA, blah blah blah...I figured it would help me to get a job in the field I wanted to work in, or at least maybe in acute care. I was WRONG. I was not a super-young "out on my own for the first time" person, either. I was a single mother with an elementary school aged child to raise. I was still a bit upset to find out that in my geographical area, there were literally NO nursing jobs at that time. I ended up taking a 40 hour night nurse position in LTC, 5 x 8 hr shifts per week, every other weekend. It was my worst nightmare at the time, partly because I had worked LTC in several other capacities (including CNA while in nursing school) and was not wanting to do it again, but even worse was my inability to adapt to night shift. I became a raging insomniac then, a problem which persists 20+ years later. Anyways, I took that job with a smile on my face because it was a way to begin to get experience and it was a paycheck. There was zero orientation or preceptorship, either.

    A year later, I moved on to a sub-acute unit elsewhere on days, and was promoted to unit manager shortly thereafter. A year later, I was finally able to get a job in an acute care hospital. As I was experienced, my orientation was fairly short. My job was actually fascinating and opened many doors for me - I was a float pool nurse across multiple campuses. I was able to get chemo certification, IV therapy training, critical care certification & ACLS and other great skills. I took a permanent position on a unit there a few years later, and became the lead preceptor on the cardiac/telemetry unit. I carried a full patient load, was permanent charge nurse, and precepted someone almost all the time. The nurses working with me and learning from me were usually required to work my base schedule (3 x 12 hr shifts, 7a-7p), even though I frequently worked many more hours. Every one of them were always thankful to have been able to work with me and learn from me. Those that worked on my unit subsequently were always stronger, more confident and felt better trained after a 3-4 month period of precepting with me. At that facility, permanent charge nurses did not receive extra pay/differentials for being a preceptor, either.

    Look at your situation in this way; accept that you need to enter the adult world and become a bit more self-sufficient. Plan time with your family around your temporary work schedule - it IS temporary! Understand what you said at the beginning; you picked this position at this facility because it is WHERE YOU WANT TO WORK. Stick with it! Learn everything you can from your preceptor - he/she is there not only to teach you the rules of the facility/unit, but to help you start your career in nursing by helping you learn the basics too. Pay attention...BE A SPONGE!! Suck up every bit of knowledge and wisdom they can impart. Remember too...you are NEW, you are learning...be grateful, be gracious.

    GOOD LUCK!!
  12. by   not.done.yet
    I am very curious about what the OP did

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