New BSN grad fired after 5 weeks of orientation

  1. 0
    Does your work history under your ss# show terminations? I was hired within a teaching hospital as a new grad, during my orientation my preceptor was unorganized and did not have a routine. She often appeared overwhelmed. I tried to understand her frustrations as well as adjust to her routine. I requested another preceptor and I was told there was not any more staff at the time, I was told I needed to remember every thing I was told and I should not still be referring to my notes. I asked to be transferred to another floor instead I was told it's not working out and terminated. Now I'm having a hard time finding a job as a new grad. I feel like I have wasted four years of nursing school because I can't find a job that I would like to work. Does your work history under your ss# show terminations?
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  3. 23 Comments so far...

  4. 4
    A background check should show everything. And even if you get away with a lie initially, a lie on your application discovered later subjects you to immediate termination. It's not worth it.
    When you explain that things didn't work out, just try to focus on the positive and what you learned while acknowledging that it wasn't a "good fit". Refrain from saying negative things about your past employer or preceptor(s), no matter how true you believe them to be.
    chare, KelRN215, danielle.schamer, and 1 other like this.
  5. 9
    I hate to say this but I love how it is always the preceptors fault that a new grad is having a hard time in orientation.....
  6. 3
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    I hate to say this but I love how it is always the preceptors fault that a new grad is having a hard time in orientation.....
    It's not, always ....but sometimes it's a big factor. My first preceptor did NOT want to be a preceptor and I was sinking fast until the DON took mercy on me and assigned me to someone new. I did fine after then.
    grudgrime, macfar28, and Spangle Brown like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    I hate to say this but I love how it is always the preceptors fault that a new grad is having a hard time in orientation.....
    Maybe not the preceptors, but once you are hired a hospital has invested a decent amount of money into you.

    And if you were hired for 5+ weeks like the OP the hospital invested likely over 10,000$ into you.

    So either they completely effed up in their hiring/screening/interviewing process, and hired someone who was completely incompetent.

    Or they didn't put together a comprehensive organized orientation and training process, which resulted in a new grad failing.

    Its certainly possible that a new grad is some combination of lazy and or stupid ( absolutely NOT talking about the OP, but in general). But then that would be on the hospital for doing a terrible job in their hiring process, hiring someone who is completely unqualified for the position.

    im a HUGE proponent of personal responsibility.

    But I also believe that every time a new grad sizzles and burns out it is ALWAYS at the fault of the hiring organization. And sometimes also at fault of the new grad themselves.
    LadyFree28 and danielle.schamer like this.
  8. 4
    Being terminated from any position isn't an easy thing to accept, thus your anger, hurt and bitter feelings are understandable. However being as that may it is never wise nor advisable to allow such things to cloud your search for future employment elsewhere. Most certainly do not express such feelings to potential employers. They are seeking workers and aren't social service agencies or therapists. Also the world of nursing in many areas is very small. You have no idea what recruiter or nurse manager knows others in a particular town or elsewhere. Your preceptor may very well have been a horror, but kept that to yourself, trust me on this one.

    Everyone expects some percentage of new grads to flit around between floors/units and or facilities with some barely completing a month of orientation. Things just happen and it is no different than other employment situations. You can be the best candidate on paper and interviews but when things began in the real world they just didn't work out. It is the old "Its not you, its me..." sort of thing.

    Allow yourself a few days to vent and get the bile out of your system, then get right back out there and look for another position. If asked about recent work I'd go ahead and mention/put down your brief time at your previous employer (again sans any negative comments about your preceptor), simply because a job is a job. If asked why you left and or whatever simply tell the truth; things just didn't work out/it was not a good fit. The important thing to do is remain positive and upbeat.

    While looking take the time to perhaps look into obtaining any certifications you are lacking and other ways to make yourself an outstanding candidate. Oh and finally remember it takes two to tango. Yes, your preceptor may or may not have had issues but consider how she felt and or it seemed when you requested another preceptor and or to be transferred to another floor.

    Did you confide any of your "concerns" to others at work or even on the floor? If so and you can stand a bit more of motherly advice don't do that again. *LOL* In the grand scheme of things your preceptor is an experienced staff RN, and if she is anything like most she is not going to let a new grad (BSN, ADN or diploma) bad mouth her out of a job or harm her professional reputation. Since it is she who controls your destiny so to speak want to lay odds on who will be leaving that hospital first?
    S.RN, KelRN215, LadyFree28, and 1 other like this.
  9. 6
    I'm confused as to why you would think your SSN would indicate HOW you left a job...?? When you are paid legally by an employer, Social Security funds are taken out of your paycheck. During times of employment, there are SS payments made. Period.

    Background checks will no doubt turn up all kinds of interesting things, but it's not going to be your social security payments that will say you got fired....that will be from another source.

    On another note, I found it interesting that in your description of the events leading up to your termination, at no point do you take any responsibility for it---any of it. It was all your preceptor's fault, according to you. That doesn't sound right; even if your preceptor wasn't the best, surely you can't expect the next job to believe you were terrific, just railroaded out?

    How are you going to approach the question when you are asked "what did you learn from your experience at XYZ Hospital? What would you do differently?" Be prepared to look deep and answer honestly, with what really went into that termination decision. And the answer can't be "it was the preceptor's fault all the way".
    Last edit by RNsRWe on Jul 3 : Reason: .
    chare, S.RN, TheMoonisMyLantern, and 3 others like this.
  10. 4
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I'm confused as to why you would think your SSN would indicate HOW you left a job...?? When you are paid legally by an employer, Social Security funds are taken out of your paycheck. During times of employment, there are SS payments made. Period.

    Background checks will no doubt turn up all kinds of interesting things, but it's not going to be your social security payments that will say you got fired....that will be from another source.

    On another note, I found it interesting that in your description of the events leading up to your termination, at no point do you take any responsibility for it---any of it. It was all your preceptor's fault, according to you. That doesn't sound right; even if your preceptor wasn't the best, surely you can't expect the next job to believe you were terrific, just railroaded out?

    How are you going to approach the question when you are asked "what did you learn from your experience at XYZ Hospital? What would you do differently?" Be prepared to look deep and answer honestly, with what really went into that termination decision. And the answer can't be "it was the preceptor's fault all the way".
    Not to defend the OP too much, but he was fired 5 weeks in

    So unless he was showing up late, leaving early, and drinking on the job

    I cant imagine how or why someone would be fired as a new grad that soon.

    A new grad failing 3-6 months in id be right with you, saying its likely the new grads fault for not being ambitious or assertive enough taking responsibility for their career

    but 5 weeks !? Somethings funky

    Either the OP is lying/leaving out key details, or the hospital that hired them screwed something major up
    grudgrime, FutureNurseK, Nola009, and 1 other like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from mhy12784
    Not to defend the OP too much, but he was fired 5 weeks in

    So unless he was showing up late, leaving early, and drinking on the job

    I cant imagine how or why someone would be fired as a new grad that soon.

    A new grad failing 3-6 months in id be right with you, saying its likely the new grads fault for not being ambitious or assertive enough taking responsibility for their career

    but 5 weeks !? Somethings funky

    Either the OP is lying/leaving out key details, or the hospital that hired them screwed something major up
    Ok, fair enough. I guess I'd have to go with my gut that a hospital doesn't willy-nilly fire someone five weeks in, considering what the hiring process is like nowadays, and the costs associated with same.

    Therefore, I'd believe there was more to the story than we know in this thread. Maybe the OP is well-aware, and is leaving out details. Maybe he/she is completely UNaware, but the troubles are there just the same. Either way, the OP does have to handle this well in order to recover....and that includes offering a reasonable, plausible explanation to a future employer as to what might have gone wrong, and why it WON'T possibly go wrong if Future Employer takes a chance and hires him/her.
  12. 3
    You do know that your SS# tells nothing about your employment history except that you did or did not receive compensation from an employer, right? Why do people think this?!


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