Need help with shift reporting

  1. I'm having trouble with change of shift reporting. Sometimes I feel like I'm giving too much info, and other times I feel as if I'm forgetting something important. I also find it difficult to organize and prioritize all the information that I need to give in report. Anyone have any tips?
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   jude11142
    Originally posted by TNRN
    I'm having trouble with change of shift reporting. Sometimes I feel like I'm giving too much info, and other times I feel as if I'm forgetting something important. I also find it difficult to organize and prioritize all the information that I need to give in report. Anyone have any tips?
    It took me some time to be able to give report and feel good about it....lol.........like you, I felt like I was giving too much info, lol, my relief would be like yawning, lolllllll, but I didn't want to forget anything.....so now on my census sheet, I write down all pertinent info and use that as a guideline. Remember to report any out of ordinary incidences and not sweat the routine stuff. I would be like, "her fingerstick was 97 at 4pm, say the VS's etc", and one day a coworker called me aside and said, 'just stick to important stuff"........they can always look for fs's etc......
    It's not easy though, but after awhile you get the hang of it. I learned alot from when others gave me report, it made me realize what was important and what isn't.......lol, I even had my time when I was saying to myself, "who cares, get to stuff that matters"........lol........had to laugh at that one
    Alot depends on where you work, if you are on a med/surg unit, in a LTCF etc........If it's ltc, where we have 30pts, I'm like, nothing new with mr.x, same for next one and next one, then say, mrs. p, ABT/UTI, voiding well, enc. increased fluids, monitor I&O, mr. x is on comfort measures, morphine for pain, t&p q2hrs, and so on.....in hosp settings,
    I report anything out of the ordinary for each patient. I usually start with "pt#1, their admitting dx, LOC, if they are on o2, if they have an IV(what's running, rate etc), other lines, g-tubes/ng tubes, dressings, if they are going for any tests on next shift etc........

    Stuff like that, but still learning too, so I'd like to hear from others.

    JUDE
  4. by   meownsmile
    About the same here. We have action lists on each door chart so that "if" people are working the way they were oriented all the routine stuff is there. They should be checking those when they come in for daily things.
    I was told noone should take longer than 15 min. for report, so i try to stick to the unusual changes(LOC, drains, procedures for the day) things like that.
    I try to let people know if someone is going for xrays, if they are to be up or not. If i need VS outside of what is on the sheets. Sometimes changes in the action sheets dont get updated so i try to make anything not updated clear in report.
    It still is a little difficult because i dont feel like im giving people what they need to take proper care of the patients. Im still learning too.
  5. by   shay
    You're in the nursery, yes? Here's how I report:

    Gestational age @ birth.
    Day of life.
    Birth weight.
    Current weight.
    Pertinent maternal risk factors.
    Current meds/IV rates/ml's per kg.
    O2 (room air, 30%, etc)
    If the kiddo has been having any a's and b's (apnea/bradycardia)
    Any scheduled tests for that day.
    Feeds: frequency, type, volume, any additives (hmf, lipids, etc)

    This is just a basic outline. It hits the high points and major info. Hope this helps!
  6. by   TNRN
    Thank you!

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