I Quit My Job - page 3

This is what I wrote when I got home after deciding I'm never returning to my first real nursing job. Struggling RN I come from a middle class family. There are a lot of gaps... Read More

  1. Visit  ChristinP profile page
    4
    you are 21 and i'm old enough to be your mom (almost ) so listen to me because i say this like a mom or like i would to one of my students. you can't quit until you've given your all. you decided to become a nurse because you met some compassionate nurses who made a good, long lasting impression on you.
    you have not yet found the type of nursing you would like to do. that is one of the wonderful things about nursing, the opportunities. you are employable in numerous areas... the catch is experience and that is where you will have to work hard and wait until some time passes.
    i wish you the best in finding a place that will train you and help you become the best nurse you can be. do not give up on your dreams.
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  3. Visit  Scarlette Wings profile page
    5
    Wow, just wow. I have lived through more shifts like this than I want to remember. I certainly had enough flashbacks when reading your entry that my own heart ached. There really are too many hospitals running staff that crazy and that short and burn out is totally real. I think they call it compassion fatigue now, but it is all the same.

    Too often I watch nurses go from job to job hoping it will get better, the "grass is always greener on the other side of the fence" concept. Or I watch nurses return to school thinking another degree or specialty will improve things but the bottom line is that too many hospitals are just like the nightmare described.

    Nurses try management and find that is like a candle being burned from both ends and the heart and soul of a nurse just aches to do their true job, to give great care in a caring way. I wish you all the best. I don't have any answers except leaving that place was the right thing for you to do and the greatest patient of all to take care of is the one within. Take care of yourself because the "healthcare system" will use you and abuse you and then throw you away 99% of the time.
  4. Visit  MauraRN profile page
    3
    Your experience is a familiar refrain to many nurses, a lot depends on which state you are in, even where in the state you are, for instance downtown Boston is a completely different world compared to the rest of the state of Massachusetts. Every time that I hear that every thing is the nurses' fault because they have "poor time management skills" I want to scream. I am not young, have 30 years of business experience behind me, been a nurse for 6 years. I feel so sorry for the younger nurses who don't have the benefit of knowing that their work experiences are unacceptable, not their "time management skills".
    Aurora77, tokidoki7, and Merced like this.
  5. Visit  Pachinko profile page
    2
    Part of this has to do with the economy. I'm currently a clinical instructor at a junior college, teaching ADNs. Many of my students have had difficulty finding jobs, have had to move or settle for crappy jobs that are only open because nobody wants them, etc. This is so different from my experience. When I started in 2006, hospitals were desperate to hire new grads. Jobs like the one described in the original post were staffed by registry or per diem, who were paid better for putting up with such horrible conditions. I tell my students that the pendulum will swing back some day, it always seems to, and they will have more freedom. The question is when it will happen.

    You do bring a strong academic record, but you are also competing against BSNs for jobs. Hospitals have their picks of the litter, and with limited positions, they will may be more likely to go for the BSN-prepared student. I'm not saying it's right, but I think it's true. My hospital is trying to move toward an all-BSN staff as part of being a magnet beacon hospital.

    As already mentioned in many posts, the problem is NOT you. The problem was your facility, and the reason you got the job in the first place was probably because they can't keep anyone in the position. Who knows how many new grad RNs they've burned through before you.
    tokidoki7 and eatmysoxRN like this.
  6. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88 profile page
    0
    Quote from christinp
    you are 21 and i'm old enough to be your mom (almost ) so listen to me because i say this like a mom or like i would to one of my students. you can't quit until you've given your all. you decided to become a nurse because you met some compassionate nurses who made a good, long lasting impression on you.
    you have not yet found the type of nursing you would like to do. that is one of the wonderful things about nursing, the opportunities. you are employable in numerous areas... the catch is experience and that is where you will have to work hard and wait until some time passes.
    i wish you the best in finding a place that will train you and help you become the best nurse you can be. do not give up on your dreams.
    my mother told me this yesterday when i told her i didn't want to do bedside anymore. you both are 100 percent correct. right now i hate my current job, its ltc. it makes me want out of nursing sometimes. i have to realize that i have to try different areas before giving up on nursing. i did enjoy addiction nursing and school nursing, however i need more med-surg exp. anyway, i digress. i'm not giving up on my career. i'm 23 so if i still feel the same way after trying another area of nursing, i can always go back to school.
  7. Visit  interceptinglight profile page
    5
    I am a CNA who recently quit working in the LTC facility I was employed by because of many of the same reasons this OP decided to leave her job, which I applaud her for. The risk to my own health and the health of the residents that I wasn't able to give proper care to wasn't worth the paltry pay I was getting, and when I got written up for a fall that occurred because of someone else's negligence, not mine....that was the last straw. Up until then I had considered pursuing a nursing degree and full-time career as an RN....however I am grieved to say that I'm now glad I didn't. New nursing grads have to run a brutal gauntlet of applying for jobs that just aren't there....many are forced to accept jobs in sub-level facilities such as the one described in this post just to pay off the debt they racked up achieving the education necessary for a 'recession-proof' job...hello? Long-term projections for nursing are still good....however they're only good in about 5 to 10 years. I'm 49 years old, how long would I have to wait for the kind of job that would make my efforts worthwhile?

    I sure don't want to be a downer or a discouragement to anyone following this post....I am only stating the obvious -- that nursing is such a WONDERFUL PROFESSION being destroyed by cost-containment measures that require staffing be cut to below bare minimum. The result is people like ANagyRN, who is the epitome of professionalism and compassion, the two most important traits a nurse can have....leaving and being replaced by someone who may not give a damn about the patients but who just needs a decent-paying job. ANagyRN --- you're too good to leave this field entirely! You are needed!! Explore your options, which are many and don't let your obvious competency and inspiring work ethic go to waste!! Good luck to you!!
  8. Visit  SmellTheCoffee profile page
    1
    Just want to say I support you. I had a similar new grad experience. On my second day of orientation, my preceptor called in sick so the "charge nurse" (there was no charge on the floor, the nurses rotated charge responsibilities), who knew that it was my second day as a nurse, assigned me to 3 hospice patients by myself with no access to the pyxis for narx. I had to figure out when to give meds and find the charge nurse well in advance of my chosen administration time so I could coax her to do me the favor of getting meds out of the pyxis for me. I was adamant I wasn't going to let them eat THIS young. I made it nearly a year on that floor. I now have a much better work environment. I think DNP is the way to go for you, intelligent one.
    Ella26 likes this.
  9. Visit  LovedRN profile page
    1
    I would have quit too. I agress with the abovt post: DNP is the way to go. How about CRNA? But before getting into those you need experiences though.


    Goodluck.
    eatmysoxRN likes this.
  10. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    1
    just wanted to wish you good luck. i've been lucky enough that i've had days like you described only a handful of times. i cannot imagine willingly walking into work knowing a situation like that would be the likely scenario. that is not the norm. best wishes to you! [color=#b22222]♥
    eatmysoxRN likes this.
  11. Visit  nyteshade profile page
    2
    Quite frankly OP, your hospital is not the standard, and I wouldn't be surprised if this hospital was in danger of losing government funds with all the deficiencies you point out. You NEED to leave this place. I hope you are able to land another job quickly, or relocate. I understand the job market is tough, but losing a license is tougher.
    Ella26 and eatmysoxRN like this.
  12. Visit  zafariarms profile page
    0
    I am stuggling also of my work, It is my fourth week of working alone next week after my 3 weeks orientation but I still not comfortable and hard to speed up. Some of my collegues reported bad things about me that I am incompetent nurse coz i always make mistakes. I always finish late and my documentation is not as good compared to them. I miss a lot of things and I always go home exhausted. I feel like Im so stressed, I kept on thinking of my work all the time even at home and I cant sleep straight away. Sometimes i feel like quitting my job but i dont have a choice and i dont like to give up. I need to keep going and carry on with this battle. I still have a good spirit overcoome this very challenging job that affect me, seems i got no life at all for thinking too much how to cope.
  13. Visit  eatmysoxRN profile page
    0
    Quote from zafariarms
    I am stuggling also of my work, It is my fourth week of working alone next week after my 3 weeks orientation but I still not comfortable and hard to speed up. Some of my collegues reported bad things about me that I am incompetent nurse coz i always make mistakes. I always finish late and my documentation is not as good compared to them. I miss a lot of things and I always go home exhausted. I feel like Im so stressed, I kept on thinking of my work all the time even at home and I cant sleep straight away. Sometimes i feel like quitting my job but i dont have a choice and i dont like to give up. I need to keep going and carry on with this battle. I still have a good spirit overcoome this very challenging job that affect me, seems i got no life at all for thinking too much how to cope.
    It's been a while since I posted this initially. Update: my job on ICU Stepdown (supposedly) is fantastic compared to the job I described here. I'm charging and feel comfortable and competent now. However, ratios are 8:1 on my floor and acuity is high. Some nights I feel drained and unsafe. But thinking back to the position I posted here makes me keep my head up. It taught me more than I ever imagined and made me grateful for my new facility.

    Give yourself time. It'll start to click and you'll learn to leave work at work. Do your best and learn to prioritize. There are so many posts about new grad challenges because school really doesn't prepare you for work. You'll make it. Don't cut corners. Be competent even if it takes longer. If you aren't ready to be off of orientation tell your manager. Even if they say no, make sure they know. Good luck!
  14. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    0
    I am really happy to hear your update. Good for you!


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