I passed now what?

  1. I still can't believe after three and a half years of nursing school it's finally over! Now that the NCLEX isn't looming over my head anymore, I can think of my future in concrete terms. Does anybody know what work place orientation is like? I'm assuming I need to pass some kind of math and skills tests. Sitters are all lined up, but I have not worked since my first child was born twelve years ago. I'm a little nervous, and very excited. Ready or not, here I come real world.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   orchid
    Quote from vhope
    I still can't believe after three and a half years of nursing school it's finally over! Now that the NCLEX isn't looming over my head anymore, I can think of my future in concrete terms. Does anybody know what work place orientation is like? I'm assuming I need to pass some kind of math and skills tests. Sitters are all lined up, but I have not worked since my first child was born twelve years ago. I'm a little nervous, and very excited. Ready or not, here I come real world.

    Hi..we both passed the same day...I feel drained...anyways now for the interviews and writing of resumes for me anyways , was thinking of taking off for 2 weeks and go visiit my parents who live in Jamaica before I start working...looking forward to the future
  4. by   purplemania
    Our facility requires a math/med test and a blood administration test, but only after you receive orientation on the policies. We do our skills testing via a competency manual. The new nurse gets entries "checked off" after demonstrating them to another RN. This can takes weeks to complete, depending on your patient population. The important thing is, you are now a nurse!
  5. by   KimRN03
    I am also a new RN. We had a med test that was pretty laid back. Lots of simple po med conversions, some heparin conversions and insulin questions. It was no big deal if we got a couple of them wrong we were asked to review our work and if we had questions we could ask. As far as skills were concerned, during orientation we were given a packet that has a bunch of skills in it. We are asked the first time we perform a skill to have our preceptor observe our technique, then they sign off on it. If we are comfortable with that skill then we can perform it by ourselves next time. Hope this helps! Remember as a new RN you are not expected to know how to do everything!
  6. by   Ortho_RN
    At my hospital we didn't have to take any tests. We sat through a one week class, where we did computer modules.. Then you go to the floor and work with a preceptor, who helps you get checked off on all your skills.

    So I'm assuming you don't have a job yet?? Good luck, Im sure you won't have a problem.
  7. by   meownsmile
    sorry,, i read the title to this thread and thought to myself "Go to work?",, hehe,, LOL, Congratulations,,
  8. by   hock1
    Thanks for the laugh...that was pretty funny.
  9. by   MaleAPRN
    First of all, CONGRATULATIONS to all of you who are RECENT RNs.:hatparty:

    If you decide to hire on as an RN in ANY unit...it would benefit you in the long run to make sure that you get a very good orientation.

    When I graduated in 1996, hospitals were strict (in California) in making sure that new grads received a full-blown (and I remember getting a full TWO WEEKS of classroom and TWO weeks of preceptored orientation). Unfortunately, this is not the case today. Due to the nursing shortage, many hospital units are forced to hire inexperienced nurses to take care of their patients. Many new grads are put "out there" after only, and in most cases, less than 10 days of orientation (as I have noted in the past couples years).

    If you ever get hired by an organization that will only offer you less than 10 days of orientation, or if they tell you, "Oh, you'll do fine! Just shadow Nurse Doe for the next 3 days, and she'll show you the ropes" then this should ring a bell in your heads, telling you, "hey, this is my license, I don't want to screw it up!" "No thanks, I'll look for another job where they will train me WELL".

    Once you guys have your one year of nursing under your belts...IT's SKIES THE LIMIT to what you can do in nursing!

    Congrats!
  10. by   treddrn
    vhope,
    I understand exactly how you feel. I was just exhausted after finding out that I passed the dreaded NCLEX. I celebrated and got some rest and now I will start a job in the ER. So congratulations and be very proud of yourself. I hope everyone around you is sharing in this joyful time with you!!! Not everyone around me shared in my joy, but oh well.
  11. by   Tweety
    Woot!!! Congrats. Let the fun begin!
  12. by   rollingstone
    Congratulations!! Now that you've earned your state license there will indeed be a med calculation test, probably some type of skills assessment, and an orientation to whatever area you chose to practice in. With regards to "what's next," well, now it's time to go to work. Now your education will begin in earnest. Take a moment to savor your accomplishment and then walk through the next door. Good Luck!
  13. by   angel337
    Quote from vinnysca
    First of all, CONGRATULATIONS to all of you who are RECENT RNs.:hatparty:

    If you decide to hire on as an RN in ANY unit...it would benefit you in the long run to make sure that you get a very good orientation.

    When I graduated in 1996, hospitals were strict (in California) in making sure that new grads received a full-blown (and I remember getting a full TWO WEEKS of classroom and TWO weeks of preceptored orientation). Unfortunately, this is not the case today. Due to the nursing shortage, many hospital units are forced to hire inexperienced nurses to take care of their patients. Many new grads are put "out there" after only, and in most cases, less than 10 days of orientation (as I have noted in the past couples years).

    If you ever get hired by an organization that will only offer you less than 10 days of orientation, or if they tell you, "Oh, you'll do fine! Just shadow Nurse Doe for the next 3 days, and she'll show you the ropes" then this should ring a bell in your heads, telling you, "hey, this is my license, I don't want to screw it up!" "No thanks, I'll look for another job where they will train me WELL".

    Once you guys have your one year of nursing under your belts...IT's SKIES THE LIMIT to what you can do in nursing!

    Congrats!
    i have heard of LTC facilities giving 10 day orientations but in most hospitals the orientation is 12 weeks. at least in chicago it is. i am receiving 10 weeks because I was a tech in the ED before i graduated. it is absolutely IMPOSSIBLE for any new grad to be comfortable on their own in 10 days as a RN. i suggest anyone looking for their first RN job to call hospitals in their area and ask how long is new grad orientation. i'm sure they would be glad to help you.

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