I Love My First Job

  1. Hello!

    I just graduated with my RN in December. I recieved my first job offer 2 days after graduation and accepted immediately, knowing that I was super lucky to have a job offer so soon. The unit I am on is considered a 72 hour observation unit that is technically outpatient. We get patients from the ER who are on the edge of a full admit, and overflow if the hospital is full. I see EVERY different kind of patient you can think of. Stroke, cardiac, renal, surgery, you name it. Its a fast paced unit with 5 patients at one time, but you could end up having 10 different ones with discharges and admissions. I honestly could not love my unit more. All the nurses are awesome and really care about their patient's and its just a great environment. I also work three 12 1/2 hour shifts for full time and the hospital is a 2 minute drive from my house. This is awesome because I have kids and like to be close to home and the travel time is so incredibly low.
    I don't know if I am in the honeymoon phase or what, but almost everyone who works there thinks that our hospital is the worst hospital to work for, and can't wait to leave, and has a reputation of having a high turnover. Pay is lower at ours (24.50 days, 26.00 nights and weekends) the two others around us start at 30-34. Those other 2 hospitals are 45min-1hr away from where I live.

    I have an opportunity to work at one of the other hospitals, the one that starts out at 34 an hour after shift diff. This hospital is known for being amazing. Everyone wants to work there and every person who I have met who works there can't find anything wrong to say. Its somewhat hard to get your foot into this one, so I feel like I am making a bad decision staying where I am and not persuing this opportunity. It is also 5 days a week vs 3 days a week, I love working 3 12s and having the opportunity to get overtime whenever I want.

    Has anyone been in this situation? I REALLY love my job. I am excited to go into there everyday and see what kind of patients I am getting. I love the people I work with, everything.
    •  
  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from PennNurse
    I REALLY love my job. I am excited to go into there everyday and see what kind of patients I am getting. I love the people I work with, everything.
    Welcome to these forums.

    You are truly blessed to have found a job that you love. It seems as if your positive attitude contributes to your fondness of your job more than anything.
  4. by   PennNurse
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Welcome to these forums.

    You are truly blessed to have found a job that you love. It seems as if your positive attitude contributes to your fondness of your job more than anything.

    Thank you! I worked in retail for 9 years before getting my RN, knowing the entire time that I really wanted to be a nurse but couldn't at the time. I appreciate the fact that I am doing what I always dreamed of doing. The money is nice considering where I came from haha, so I am not motivated by that as much as what kind of patients I will get, what I will learn, what skills I will use, what skills I will lose, ect. I am worried that I will eventually see the big picture and regret not taking the chance .
  5. by   Purple_roses
    Well, it sounds like you really love your job! As a new grad who's anxious about her new job that will be starting soon, it's encouraging to see that some new grads love their jobs. Good teamwork and good coworkers are invaluable things. If you don't need the higher pay and love the work environment and shifts, why leave?
  6. by   traumaRUs
    Best wishes for cont success and happiness.

    Moved to First Year After Nursing Licensure
  7. by   CrunchRN
    If you are happy and supported you should stay.
  8. by   PennNurse
    Quote from Purple_roses
    Well, it sounds like you really love your job! As a new grad who's anxious about her new job that will be starting soon, it's encouraging to see that some new grads love their jobs. Good teamwork and good coworkers are invaluable things. If you don't need the higher pay and love the work environment and shifts, why leave?
    Honestly, I was so nervous as well! Especially with the reputation the hospital has. I think I am going to stay, worse comes to worse I can try to go there in the future. I also don't want to screw the place I am working after they invested all the time and money orienting me.
    I hope you love your new job! I think there would be something wrong if we weren't a tad nervous haha
  9. by   37changes
    I am happy to see a post from someone so happy ~ after all of the horror stories I've read here! Congrats.
  10. by   BedsideNurse
    If you find a nursing job with hours you like, acceptable pay, and you can say you love your job, I say you better stay there. That is very hard to come across. Congratulations on finding a great unit that sounds like a perfect fit.
  11. by   chacha82
    If you love your job, DON'T leave it! The grass is not always greener. There could always be something else out there. But if you love where you are, stay.
  12. by   oldpsychnurse
    I left the job I loved to go where the money was. I was back in 6 months. There are too many pros where you're at to leave. But don't worry. One day you'll get a new manager, or a new DON, or something, and it'll all go to heck. That's when you move. And by then, you'll hopefully have in the years and the experience that they'll hire you quickly. IMO, happiness at work is worth way more than the money.
  13. by   PennNurse
    Quote from oldpsychnurse
    I left the job I loved to go where the money was. I was back in 6 months. There are too many pros where you're at to leave. But don't worry. One day you'll get a new manager, or a new DON, or something, and it'll all go to heck. That's when you move. And by then, you'll hopefully have in the years and the experience that they'll hire you quickly. IMO, happiness at work is worth way more than the money.
    Excellent advice! The thought of my unit changing makes me sad after reading this hahaha. Honestly, I hate making unneeded changes. Don't fix something that isn't broke. I wanted impartial advice from nurses who have seen more then I have. All of my friends and nursing school friends think I am nuts for staying, but I am 100% not going anywhere after reading everyones comments on here.

    Thanks for the input!
  14. by   Ben_Dover
    PennNurse, I'm so happy for you!

    ER/ED/"Observation" unit for me is one of the bests floors there is when it comes to floor nursing. All walkie-talkies and mostly rule outs: COPD exacerbations tx with nebs, CH-eFrs simply requiring diuretics, Costochondritis, MDs playing to be safe, requiring trop. level checks. When all else are ok, they are good to be dc'd in less than 10-23 hours, it is a fast paced environment and the next thing you know you're getting off soon.

    ER/ED/Observation, depending on the unit can be considered, as a-go-to-unit for, as the OP mentioned, r/o "strokes", hyperglycemic/cemia, patients, ETOH patient's who simply requires IV hydration s/p fall and banging their heads, simple head/finger lacs with elevated INR levels, Epistaxis, plug some rapid rhino or balloons and most of these patients can go once everything is under control. I can name a whole bunch more of admitting dx or problems. Bottom line and the true beauty is, you do see a little bit of everything in this unit. Yet, not as critical as majority of the ER patients.

    OP, you will appreciate more how fortunate you are to be in this unit. Wait till you have completed your "probationary period" and when permitted, they will start floating you to a higher level of care/acuity. I bet you, you will see a big difference.

    I get approach a lot by nursing students as to where the best place is to start, I always recommend, the "Step-Down" AKA "DOU", to some establishments. At least here in California, the ratio typically is 4:1, but once you have a vented/trach'd pt. the ratio becomes 3:1(Depending on the facility). The great thing about this unit is, you get a heck a lot of experience; and give it 2 years or so and once you have developed that critical thinking/time management/"common" sense skills, you have control over as to where you want to be, may it be ICU, ER, GI, OR, IR... man, it's endless! However, I also do recommend to follow to what their brain is telling them and not just their "hearts."
    SNFs are great but it will not be my first pick, unless it's been two years and you still haven't *******' landed a job!

    Again, that's just my opinion and it truly is obviously subjective.

    P.s. Don't worry about the management changing "this and that", best you can do is to acclimate!
    I think I said quite a mouthful, got carried away there for a minute! Next time, I'll try to be short, brief, and concise!
    Last edit by Ben_Dover on Mar 21 : Reason: Ask and you shall "Receive" =)

close