I feel rotton

  1. Found out just today I got let go of my current position in pediatrics...just 4 weeks into starting on the floor (total of 8 weeks with preceptor). I am just so numb I can't even think. I was at my all time high when I first got hired, and now I'm on my all time low. After one lousy three day week (well two lousy day, one much better day) on the floor where I felt so overwelmed I froze up, then this happened. But I guess it's not the end of the world. I was told maybe the acuity of the floor is not fit for me to start out with and that I should seek somewhere less acute. However I was told in the future after gaining more experience, I could apply back. It's just really hard on my feelings right now. Has anything like this happened to any of you?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi there...please don't take this personally. Take the advice to heart, find something a little less acute, get a year's experience and go back. You couldn't have done anything too terribly wrong because they asked you back.

    Go get them!
  4. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I truly feel your pain. A month ago, I was fired from a job that I thought at the time was my dream job. Check for my other posts and read the thread... I turned to this board fr support just as you are now, and they helped me more than I can describe. I don't know if you are religious, but it helped me to turn my problems over to God and ask Him to direct me to where He intends me to be. When I began canvassing for new opportunities, I was hired on at an inpatient child's psych facility, making more than two dollars an hour more than I was at the job I lost, and I am in orientation now. I love it. Even though a month ago I would probably have cut off a finger to be allowed back at my old job, now I would not return if they offered me ten dollars more an hour. The support from this board gave me the confidence in myself to find a BETTER job.

    I know you are scared right now because of the uncertainty you face. Please try to remember that everything happens for a reason. Perhaps Pediatrics is not where you are meant to be. This is most probably a blessing in disguise, for something better awaits you. Please feel free to PM me anytime.
  5. by   DeLana_RN
    I feel your pain... 8 years ago, the head nurse from h--l forced me to resign from my first job in oncology based on a bogus evaluation full of lies she had made up :angryfire .

    It hit me like a ton of bricks, I never saw it coming, although based on some outrageous comments she had made during my so-called orientation (which I somehow tried to convince myself I couldn't possibly have heard?!) I shouldn't have been surprised - and the only thing I was guilty of was naivity

    Do nurses still eat their young? Oh yes (well, at least in '98). They made a meal out of me (and trust me, I wasn't incompetent - I had graduated second in my class of 80 and was no more disorganized than any new grad, with typical lack of time management - not that anyone helped me)...

    * * *

    It's unfair and it happens to more of us than you would ever know. Your floor should have known how to orient a new grad, or whether or not this kind of work was suited for a new grad at all (considering the kind of orientation they were willing and able to give.) But maybe they truly didn't realize that it was just a bit too intense for a new nurse - you may have been the first new grad they ever hired.

    On a positive note, it's encouraging that you were invited to reapply in the future (in my case, the head nurse told me that she would make sure that I would never work in "her" 700-bed hospital again; delusions of grandeur, for sure! I was almost convinced she had her connections 'cause I had reapplied twice just to get an impersonal rejection letter from HR - until today, when they offered me a job in their dialysis floor. On my terms, for more money than they had wanted to pay! )

    DeLana :icon_hug:

    P.S. You never know what good may come out of something that's incredibly painful and disappointing at the time. In my case, it led me to another hospital where I got experience in med/telemetry & PCU and finally dialysis, which turned out to be my true passion
  6. by   Romeo4u-RN
    Hello there:
    Please don't feel bad about this unpleasant experince. After recently graduating(BSN), I started to work in a hospital, in med/surge, and after being there for almost 3 months, the head nurse(a nun), decided that I was not qualified to work there, and fired me. Imagine how I felt, it hit me like a bomb, I wasn't expecting it. I got along very well, with all the other employees and nursing staff on the floor, many of the patients also liked me, yet this nun had it out for me. She also fired 4 other nurses as well(mostly young grads), so you can imagine how stressful and demanding it felt working on that unit. I was very responsible, never late, never missed a day, and even though my BP went up because of all the stress, caused by the head nurse, I was always positve, and helping others as well. On my last day there, while I was sitting in her office, and listening to her as to why I would no longer work there, and after reading my evaluation(of which I did not agree with), and found some bias remarks on her part, I did not sign it, and she blew up like a firecracker right in front of me, and also in the presence of two other supervisors. I also found out later on, that most of all my fellow nurses had begged her to keep me working on the floor, yet according to her, I was not fit to work there, for what ever reasons she had, and decided to let me go. Most of those same nurses still call me up, to this day, and have all given me emotional support. And to be honest with you, I also felt incompentent, and mad as hell at the time, because I said to myself:"Why me"? After studying 4 yrs. and having to go through the sacrifices and hard work just to become a nurse, and then just when everything seemed normal, then all of a sudden,"bang"!, the **** hits the ceiling, and the next thing you know, you're unemployed again, and asking yourself why is life so cruel to me. Anyway, to make this story short, 2 months after I left this hospital, I found out that the head nurse(the nun), was fired for being incompetent, abusive, and having caused alot of problems among the nursing staff. As I found later on, a group of nurses, as well as patients, had all sent their complaints to the hospital adm., as well the union, and sure enough, she was finally removed from her post. Thank God justice was done, maybe too late for me, but for others it was well deserved. I understand the staff on the floor, had quite a celebration, after she left. I also was told, that in a few months, I would be able to return and apply for work if I wanted to, of which I declined the offer, because I still felt so humiliated, and emotionally upset about how I was treated. But my faith in God was so strong, that I knew, that I knew that I was not forgotten by him. And has it turns out, God was merciful with me, and helped me find another job in a Pediatric hospital. I'm now starting to work in PICU. Not only did he help me find a better job, more important of all, he took away my bitterness, my hatred, my sadness, and made me understand why I went through this, and to tell you the truth, I feel at peace with myself now, and thats why, I wanted to share my story with you. So you see, I can symphathize with you, because at the time I felt something similiar as to what you're going through. So hang in there, and let God help you, as well as getting support from your family and friends. I know you'll do good, and belive me when I tell you this, don't give in to defeat. I wish you the best of luck, and may God guide you to make the right decisions in your life.

    Romeo4u-RN

    Quote from hica19
    Found out just today I got let go of my current position in pediatrics...just 4 weeks into starting on the floor (total of 8 weeks with preceptor). I am just so numb I can't even think. I was at my all time high when I first got hired, and now I'm on my all time low. After one lousy three day week (well two lousy day, one much better day) on the floor where I felt so overwelmed I froze up, then this happened. But I guess it's not the end of the world. I was told maybe the acuity of the floor is not fit for me to start out with and that I should seek somewhere less acute. However I was told in the future after gaining more experience, I could apply back. It's just really hard on my feelings right now. Has anything like this happened to any of you?
  7. by   rnsrgr8t
    Quote from DeLana_RN
    I feel your pain... 8 years ago, the head nurse from h--l forced me to resign from my first job in oncology based on a bogus evaluation full of lies she had made up :angryfire .

    It hit me like a ton of bricks, I never saw it coming, although based on some outrageous comments she had made during my so-called orientation (which I somehow tried to convince myself I couldn't possibly have heard?!) I shouldn't have been surprised - and the only thing I was guilty of was naivity

    Do nurses still eat their young? Oh yes (well, at least in '98). They made a meal out of me (and trust me, I wasn't incompetent - I had graduated second in my class of 80 and was no more disorganized than any new grad, with typical lack of time management - not that anyone helped me)...

    * * *

    It's unfair and it happens to more of us than you would ever know. Your floor should have known how to orient a new grad, or whether or not this kind of work was suited for a new grad at all (considering the kind of orientation they were willing and able to give.) But maybe they truly didn't realize that it was just a bit too intense for a new nurse - you may have been the first new grad they ever hired.

    On a positive note, it's encouraging that you were invited to reapply in the future (in my case, the head nurse told me that she would make sure that I would never work in "her" 700-bed hospital again; delusions of grandeur, for sure! I was almost convinced she had her connections 'cause I had reapplied twice just to get an impersonal rejection letter from HR - until today, when they offered me a job in their dialysis floor. On my terms, for more money than they had wanted to pay! )

    DeLana :icon_hug:

    P.S. You never know what good may come out of something that's incredibly painful and disappointing at the time. In my case, it led me to another hospital where I got experience in med/telemetry & PCU and finally dialysis, which turned out to be my true passion
    :yeahthat:

    Wow, that SO sounds like my story! I was on a peds Hem/Onc floor too! I was forced out after a year but in the same circumstances. I was told I chose the wrong career and that they would see to it that I would never be a nurse! (I never made a serious error that should warrant that). Well, I moved on, got a better job, gained my confidence enough to go back to grad school and I am now a PNP! Everything happens for a reason and I KNOW it will all work out! I found out my Director was fired or left in unusual circumstances about a year after I left. Good Luck and keep us posted!
  8. by   hica19
    o_O Wow!
    Last edit by hica19 on Oct 12, '06
  9. by   RNKay31
    Oh my I am so sorry to hear that, I wish all of you great success in finding your dream jobs.
  10. by   DolphinRN84
    Don't give up hope hica19. You will definitely find another job that you will hopefully find a more supportive group of people to work with. Best of luck! :icon_hug:
  11. by   humglum
    I cannot believe the number of threads lately about nurses being fired. In orientation, no less. I just can't understand this -- nobody expects new grads to know everything, just to be able to function safely and competently and know when to seek help. Unless someone makes an egregious error or has proven him or herself unsafe in multiple situations, I just don't understand why any facility would turn away an orientee they have taken the time and expense to orient.
    Or at least help them find a more suitable placement within the facility.
    I don't get it.
  12. by   hica19
    Actually the unit I got dismissed from is actually a great unit. Everyone is really nice and helpful. However they were looking out for my best interest and thought maybe the unit was too acute for me to start out with. However they did point me out in the right direction by giving me the number of the nurse recruiter to help me with more options. She also gave me her card so I could keep in contact with her. I respect that a lot. I mean the dismissal did hurt but thinking about it, I realized that maybe the unit really IS too acute for me. However after I gain more experience somewhere else and feel I want to go back, I was told I could apply again.
  13. by   humglum
    Were you working on a PICU? And weren't you aware of the level of acuity when you accepted the position? I'm not trying to be a pest, here, I'm just genuinely curious why you would accept a position, and why the facility would hire you, for something that you admit you can't handle.
    What were your shortcomings? Time management? Prioritization? All these things come with time. It upsets me to see new grads throwing in the towel and accepting lower acuity assignments when all they need is, usually, a little extra precepting and nurturing.
  14. by   DeLana_RN
    Quote from CharmCityRN
    I cannot believe the number of threads lately about nurses being fired. In orientation, no less. I just can't understand this -- nobody expects new grads to know everything, just to be able to function safely and competently and know when to seek help. Unless someone makes an egregious error or has proven him or herself unsafe in multiple situations, I just don't understand why any facility would turn away an orientee they have taken the time and expense to orient.
    Or at least help them find a more suitable placement within the facility.
    I don't get it.
    My situation (as posted above) was very similar to that of Romeo4u-RN; I assure you that I was neither ignorant nor incompetent, or I could hardly have gotten my BSN magna cum laude. Nor did I make any serious med error or any serious mistake like you infer. I worked hard and had a very positive experience with the very challenging patient population we had (mostly CA, AIDS, and sickle cell crisis).

    Sadly, the same cannot be said for the staff - a head nurse who was an antisocial bigot and her minions (who either agreed or at least went along with it; although some of her charge nurses and especially one assistant manager were nice to me in private, none of them warned me or stood up for me when it mattered).

    My short-comings were typical ones of new grads: lack of time management, but how was I supposed to learn it anyway? The "orientation" method consisted mainly of: first week, "this is where everything is". Subsequent weeks: increase the patient load by 1 or more until the maximum (7) for day shift was reached. That was basically it. Another word for it: Throw them to the wolves.

    Why does this happen to new grads? In some ways they're more vulnerable than seasoned nurses. Unless they worked on the floor or unit they want to start in as a PCT or extern (highly recommended!), they usually lack the inside information about the place; this head nurse's rep preceeded her - but I was totally oblivious to it. When I asked my nursing instructors, the best I got was "She runs a tight ship." That's an understatement... I can't understand why they weren't more explicit.

    New grads can also be dangerously idealistic and naive - just out of school, they might just do what they were encouraged to do and make suggestions about improvements on the floor; dictators don't normally appreciate this kind of thing that I'm undoubtedly guilty of. Mind you, I wasn't young (35) and had been in the business world for years; but nothing there prepared me for the reality - and politics - of nursing.

    Why didn't I immediately put in for a transfer when I first saw that all was not well in Oz? First, I was in some kind of denial (this can't be happening when she made a statement so outrageous - sorry, I can't put it on a public board, I doubt anyone would even believe it). However, she was undoubtedly trying to get me quit right then - however, I was not to stay in her hospital (which happens to just be the major one in this area). And I frankly didn't want to go anywhere else... ironically, I ended up having to do that anyway 'cause she made good on her promise that I would not be able to transfer internally

    Let's not forget that this happened in '98 - I sure hope this kind of head nurse (she insisted on using this archaic term when everyone else was nurse manager) is not tolerated anymore today. But if it is, and one of you new grads happens to (by some very bad luck, I assure you) end up on such a floor, please listen to your inner voice and RUN when you can and before she can fire you or force you to quit (for years, I had to endure the question "Have you ever been fired or been asked to resign?" on applications. Thankfully, most employers have now dropped it.)

    In hindsight, I think I would have been fine if I had been able to transfer internally, if there had been reason to suggest that I leave my original position (and help to find a more suitable position); it was very different from the situation OP finds herself in, and yet, I do understand her disappointment.

    Hica19, I wish you the very best. Please don't let this discourage you. It's hard right now, I know, but you will soon feel better.

    DeLana
    Last edit by DeLana_RN on Oct 13, '06

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