I feel rotton - page 2

Found out just today I got let go of my current position in pediatrics...just 4 weeks into starting on the floor (total of 8 weeks with preceptor). I am just so numb I can't even think. :o I was at... Read More

  1. by   wonderbee
    Quote from CharmCityRN
    I cannot believe the number of threads lately about nurses being fired. In orientation, no less. I just can't understand this -- nobody expects new grads to know everything, just to be able to function safely and competently and know when to seek help. Unless someone makes an egregious error or has proven him or herself unsafe in multiple situations, I just don't understand why any facility would turn away an orientee they have taken the time and expense to orient.
    Or at least help them find a more suitable placement within the facility.
    I don't get it.
    I think that too much is being asked of hospital floor nurses in general, and it's getting worse instead of better. Throw into that the higher acuity of the inpatient population and the popular notion that every new grad can transition straight from nursing school into a critical care unit. It's a recipe for failure.

    I also like the idea of a didactic year of school, and two years of nothing but clinical experiences before graduating, and a wider variety at that such as more OR time. I only observed one case. We're only being exposed to snippets of the truth. It does not do us or the profession justice. School is easy. The hard part is everything that comes after.

    OP, I am having a similar experience with my critical care position and am getting out. I don't think of it as a mistake but rather a learning experience. I've learned that 1) there's a nursing shortage for good reason; 2) It may take a while to find that right niche as a nurse, and 3) listen to my gut. I KNEW I was in over my head a while back and it would have been better to act on it then.

    There's no shame in all of this. Don't let it get you down. There's a big world of nursing out there and you will find your little corner of it.
  2. by   TXNurseBSN
    Quote from CharmCityRN
    I cannot believe the number of threads lately about nurses being fired. In orientation, no less. I just can't understand this -- nobody expects new grads to know everything, just to be able to function safely and competently and know when to seek help. Unless someone makes an egregious error or has proven him or herself unsafe in multiple situations, I just don't understand why any facility would turn away an orientee they have taken the time and expense to orient.
    Or at least help them find a more suitable placement within the facility.
    I don't get it.
    I agree. Plus, they should at least let you finish all of your orientation, not just half. Those 4 weeks could have made a big diiference in your abilities!
  3. by   jjjoy
    Quote from CharmCityRN
    It upsets me to see new grads throwing in the towel and accepting lower acuity assignments when all they need is, usually, a little extra precepting and nurturing.
    And what ARE "lower acuity" assignments? When I was let go at the end of my 2-month preceptorship (which comes out to only about 14 actual shifts), they didn't offer to find me something else in the hospital. They suggested something "less acute." When I spoke with a couple of people in subacute units, they immediately made the point that while the patients WERE less acute, the work was just as demanding and anyone who had trouble on a med-surg unit wouldn't do better there (I wasn't interviewing at that point, just information gathering). I later took a job with a LTC facility. Very low acuity, but impossible to do the job without cutting corners that shouldn't be cut. I figured we had no more than 4 minutes/patient to pass meds to folks who needed BP readings, pills crushed, etc. No support or suggestions, just a dismissive "everyone else manages, you should be able too." I quit after a few weeks. I didn't want a clinical job that badly.
  4. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    Quote from TXNurseBSN
    ...they should at least let you finish all of your orientation, not just half. Those 4 weeks could have made a big diiference in your abilities!
    There may be a contractual reason why that wasn't what happened. Our collective agreement in Alberta provides for a probationary period of 503.75 hours worked, during which time either party may terminate employment without recourse. So if Nancy Nurse isn't performing at the required level at hour 400, having had an evaluation previously and given opportunity to adjust, she may be returned to her former position if she had one, or go elsewhere. Or if Nancy Nurse decides at hour 502 that she's not really cut out for the job, or it isn't what she thought, or she doesn't like the paint on the walls, she can return to the position she vacated or go elsewhere. No recriminations, no excuses. That said, if no one has made the effort to communicate their concerns over Nancy Nurse's ability to perform the job at hand until hour 504, then it's too late and there's nothing that can be done.

    This happened a couple of years ago to me. I was preceptoring someone, a new grad with a stellar educational pedigree, who wasn't making the grade by midway through her orientation period of 16 weeks. I communicated this to the educator and to the nurse herself. At around this time she made a lot of switches to her schedule and I didn't work with her again until just before her 16 weeks were up. She had not made any further progress to that point and I was gravely concerned that we were going to have a problem with her. I communicated all of this to the educator and management, in writing, but basically the horse wasn't only out of the barn, it was halfway to the next county. A few months after she completed orientation, she nearly killed a patient. She no longer works in our unit, but it was her choice to leave, not anything we were able to do.
  5. by   ortess1971
    Quote from CharmCityRN
    Were you working on a PICU? And weren't you aware of the level of acuity when you accepted the position? I'm not trying to be a pest, here, I'm just genuinely curious why you would accept a position, and why the facility would hire you, for something that you admit you can't handle.
    What were your shortcomings? Time management? Prioritization? All these things come with time. It upsets me to see new grads throwing in the towel and accepting lower acuity assignments when all they need is, usually, a little extra precepting and nurturing.
    Many high acuity areas are following the new trend of hiring new grads into their areas. These new grads can do well but only if the unit realizes that they've hired a new grad and are prepared to truly help them succeed. Many DONs and staff are inadequate at orienting someone properly and are still caught up in the "I got a trial through fire, why shouldn't you" method of precepting. To the OP, you will surmount this. Like someone said, it's happened to many people. This feels horrible now, but it will make you wiser and stronger.

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