I am a new grad and can't wait to get out of orientation!

  1. Hi,
    I am a new grad and it's my third week on a busy tele floor. Here is the thing. I feel as though I don't need a preceptor anymore and feel I am ready to be on my own. Every day when I come to work I think things would have been easier for me if I could organize my day without anybody telling me what we need to do next or do it my preceptor's way. I feel confident talking to doctors and monitoring my patients. I have caught things before the patient deteriorated badly.

    But now I have a question. Am I being too confident? Am I missing something? I feel as though all new grads should feel overwhelmed and need preceptor's help. I just don't want to be one of those new grads who felt too confident and made a huge mistake because they thought they were ready too early and didn't need help.
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  2. 56 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Yes, you are being too confident. You have had NO feelings of not knowing- you already know everything the experienced nurses do?

    Proceed with caution young one.
  4. by   Libby1987
    Confidence is not the same as knowing what you don't know.
  5. by   Wuzzie
    Yes and if you aren't careful your confidence will come across as cocky which is not good for developing rapport with your peers.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    You are over-confident and that can be scary-dangerous. You won't be really "competent" for at least a year or longer (and "experienced" for 2-5 years). Yes, you will come off orientation, but believe me, you will be encountering things that stump and even scare you in that time. Best you stay on orientation as long as they allow it and if you think you know it all, start seeking new learning opportunities and challenges from your preceptor; show some initiative and learn as much as they will teach you and practice, practice, practice. Because knowing and doing are different, once on your own. Your preceptor is your safety net. Don't rush out of the gate over-confident.

    Because believe me when I tell you: it's quite a different matter being on your own that first year. Simmer down and realize your learning as only JUST BEGUN.

    That you are asking this is good; your self-awareness will be useful in your career! Good luck.
  7. by   prnqday
    The scariest nurse in the WORLD is one not knowing what they don't know. I'm not saying you should feel stressed or overwhelmed, but to think you don't need a preceptor anymore, is going a little overboard.
  8. by   CRC12
    Thank you all for replies! There are many things I still don't know, but I can ask just about any nurse on the floor if I have a quick question. Sometimes seasoned nurses ask questions which I overhear and know the answer to. So everybody has questions (young or old), but this doesn't mean everybody needs a preceptor. But I am definitely going to take your advice and stay on orientation for 12 allowed weeks.
  9. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from CRC12
    Thank you all for replies! There are many things I still don't know, but I can ask just about any nurse on the floor if I have a quick question. Sometimes seasoned nurses ask questions which I overhear and know the answer to. So everybody has questions (young or old), but this doesn't mean everybody needs a preceptor. But I am definitely going to take your advice and stay on orientation for 12 allowed weeks.
    Yes, everybody needs a preceptor. Orientees do not determine how long they need to be precepted. Your attitude is concerning. I would advise you to have a talk with your educator lest you get an unpleasant surprise.
  10. by   CRC12
    Thank you! You are right. I just need to show initiative and seek for new challenges from my preceptor.
  11. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from CRC12
    Thank you! You are right. I just need to show initiative and seek for new challenges from my preceptor.
    Perfect!!
  12. by   not.done.yet
    I had 8 weeks of orientation when I was a new grad on a busy ICU stepdown floor. By the end of it I felt ready to be on my own. My floor made me very aware that I could ask questions, seek help and support and that there were resources for me. I also had a strong preceptorship at the end of my schooling in which I had been handling four patients independently at an LTACH.

    I didn't know how much I didn't know until I got on my own, at which point the real learning curve started. If you are in a supportive learning environment, I can imagine being ready to not be quite so hovered over, but you do really feel it once that safety net goes away. Do your best to enjoy the extra safety net, seek feedback and stay humble. I am sure you will do great.
  13. by   not.done.yet
    Oh....and remember....orientation isn't only about YOU building confidence in YOURSELF. It is also about your employer and coworkers finding confidence IN YOU. Humility...appropriate questions....learning to give good report....taking great care of your patients...digging in and really dotting those I's and crossing those T's...all of this matters. It isn't just about you feeling ready. Its also about your floor feeling you are ready. Remember that.
  14. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from CRC12
    Thank you all for replies! There are many things I still don't know, but I can ask just about any nurse on the floor if I have a quick question. Sometimes seasoned nurses ask questions which I overhear and know the answer to. So everybody has questions (young or old), but this doesn't mean everybody needs a preceptor. But I am definitely going to take your advice and stay on orientation for 12 allowed weeks.
    I've worked on a tele floor before and when all hell breaks loose, you don't have time to ask the other nurses. And the other nurses aren't going to have time to stop their work to help you. I've had days (not tele, rather on onc/palliative) where we were fully staffed (5 patients/nurse, night shift) and NONE of us had time to breathe. Imagine having a patient getting blood, another is on an Argatroban drip, a third is on a heparin drip and you have a palliative patient who needs pain meds every hour. And every single nurse has an equally heavy load, except the charge nurse, who has 2 patients on chemo (one on induction) so she is having to deal with that. You don't have time to breathe, let alone ask for help or questions. And your co-workers aren't going to have time to breathe either. This has happened a lot on my unit.

    If you have a preceptor, and you start to drown (and it might happen tomorrow, you never know) you have a resource at your side to help you through it. Without that preceptor, you could very well be on your own with no one available to help you out. If you feel like you need to have your preceptor back off a bit, ask her too. Just try to be humble and polite about it.

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