How to keep going when the going is tough?

  1. Help me not to quit!
    Encourage me! I love patients.
    I love easing their pain. I even love holding thier barf buckets and packing wounds.
    I can't seem to get the paperwork straight.
    And tonight was the worst.
    And on top of it I had a young girl who had vtachs and PACs all day long!
    I kept getting calls from the tele monitor tech, and I told her doc who was there at the desk.
    Then later in the shift I would call her doc, tell her what the monitor tech said, and her doc said, "Give her more demerol until the cardiac doc gets there."
    So, I did what she said.
    She eventually ended up in the ER, (long story, new hospital, no one in ICU yet).
    End of story is I got my butt chewed for not telling the floor manager that the doc wasn't doing her job.
    I feel terrible.
    I thought the doctor was the final authority.
    Now, I know better, but I feel like such a boob!
    I honestly don't know if I'm smart enough to do this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    There's so much to learn.
    Please....
    I NEED ENCOURAGEMENT OR I'LL THROW IN THE TOWEL!!! HELP!
    When does all this stuff start to jell in the brain?
    Am I just stupid?
    Or is it a dog eat dog world and I'm wearing Milk Bone underwear????:uhoh21:
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   SusanJean
    While I am still a student, I will fall back on my life-experience to try to help here...

    The first year is always the hardest, esp as you transition from school to the "real" world.

    There is a steep learning curve now - lots that is new, and lots of jobs related stuff to learn. Hang in there, you will get it... You will make mistakes, but learning from them is part of the this curve.

    And now you know...if the pts needs are not being met by the doctor, find someone who can help or will intervene to help.

    I remember my first time in crisis intervention work, I was 20, I had to go round w/ a doctor. He yelled and screamed, but finally heard the point I was trying to make, on behalf of the pt. End result, it kept the pt from a psych admit. The dr. just wasn't listening, was making judgements w/out all the facts. But I was devistated for days about being yelled at... So I decided to talk to the doctor about it...and he had absolutely NO recollection of the incident. Wow...did that put things in perspective. I lost sleep for days, worried a hole in my stomach and this guy didn't even remember. Lesson learned.

    So hang tough, do a good job, be there for your pts... I find if you keep their best interest and tx goals in the forefront, no one can fault you in the end. (general statement, but I'm sure you get what I mean.)

    Hopefully some experienced nurses can offer specifics to the profession.
    SJ
  4. by   Brotherbob
    Quote from nurscee
    Please....
    I NEED ENCOURAGEMENT OR I'LL THROW IN THE TOWEL!!! HELP!
    The first year is not easy for anyone. To do your best is all that you can do. Keep going. The key to success is to take these bad experiences and learn from them, like you did. The other key is to be able to move on. Think of all the good things you have done, when you made a difference.
  5. by   Jessy_RN
    I have no real advice for you, but you will be in my prayers. Take whatever comes your way one day at a time and always stay positive and optimistic.
  6. by   patwil73
    Hello,

    My best advise is to constantly try to improve your efficiency. Each time I go into a pt's room I ask myself do I have everything I need, should I have brought something else in with me, etc. I look for ways to assess quicker without sacrificing accuracy (for instance, I talk to my pt's as I enter to see how alert/oriented they are, I check the catheter bag and IV poles as I walk to the bed, I ask about pain and nausea and sob before i even get next to them so by the time I'm actually standing at the bed I know -- A/O *3, pain lower back 4/10 but bearable, breathing easily no sob, no cough, no N/V but hungry, U.O. running smoothly) I also try to chart as quickly as I can. If I can get that first assessment charted quickly I have more time for any problems that come up. I try to write what needs to be done on one sheet of paper that I can always refer to (ie meds at 2200, wound care 2000, blood draw 1700, etc.) Also if I can consolidate, I do. The less trips I "need" to take into my pt's room the more efficient I think I am.

    This is the best advice I can give new nurses, always strive to improve your personal efficiency and it will make your job so much easier.

    Best of luck, keep with it, it does get easier.

    Pat
  7. by   nurscee
    Quote from patwil73
    Hello,

    My best advise is to constantly try to improve your efficiency. Each time I go into a pt's room I ask myself do I have everything I need, should I have brought something else in with me, etc. I look for ways to assess quicker without sacrificing accuracy (for instance, I talk to my pt's as I enter to see how alert/oriented they are, I check the catheter bag and IV poles as I walk to the bed, I ask about pain and nausea and sob before i even get next to them so by the time I'm actually standing at the bed I know -- A/O *3, pain lower back 4/10 but bearable, breathing easily no sob, no cough, no N/V but hungry, U.O. running smoothly) I also try to chart as quickly as I can. If I can get that first assessment charted quickly I have more time for any problems that come up. I try to write what needs to be done on one sheet of paper that I can always refer to (ie meds at 2200, wound care 2000, blood draw 1700, etc.) Also if I can consolidate, I do. The less trips I "need" to take into my pt's room the more efficient I think I am.

    This is the best advice I can give new nurses, always strive to improve your personal efficiency and it will make your job so much easier.

    Best of luck, keep with it, it does get easier.

    Pat
    Thanks to all of you. I've had two days off. Tomorrow I hope to have a better day and be able to put in a positive post. Nurscee

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