How many new nurses are seriously thinking about quiting? - page 8

And why do you want to quit? I really would like a study done on how many nurses quit nursing within the first 5 years. It seems like 80% of the student population at community colleges are... Read More

  1. by   blueberrybon
    Okay. Take a deep breath. My new job, which is on sub-acute at a nursing home/sub-acute center is running at nurse to patient ratio 1:22.

    CRAZY. That is the best word for how I feel. This seems to be a great place to learn as I go, but.....Wow! No time to think.

    Am not sure about the long run, have to give it a little time.

    Blue
  2. by   november17
    The thought of quitting crossed my mind quite a bit when I first went on my own. The last several weeks have been great. I think there is just that adjustment period. I'm sure I'll probably feel like quitting every now and then between now and eternity. However, nothing can compare to the stress of nursing school! At least I can walk out of work and relax a bit instead of studying for an exam or stressing about homework.

    I had a bad patient load last week. I walked out of there, when I came back 12 hours later the nurse that had taken over confided she had one of those "in the bathroom crying" jags. I realized it wasn't just me! Thankfully I have supportive coworkers, and I've learned to be "on the ball" a bit more through the more experienced of the crew. I've learned to reach out to the helping hands that are offered if I need them, and learned to offer my hand if I see/sense a fellow nurse who needs it.

    The only way I'll ever quit nursing is when the nursing board pries my license from my cold dead fingers (or if I win the lotto). Otherwise I'll just keep on truckin'. I used to work in carpentry prior to becoming an RN, and when things get bad, I just thank my lucky stars that I get to work indoors. For all the other times, it is useful just to vent...this website is good for that.
    Last edit by november17 on Sep 27, '07
  3. by   verynewnurse
    i totaly agree with you. extern program is the best way of transition from being student nurse with help to a nurse who does it all. unfortunately i missed that part in my carrier and regret a lot. i have been nurse only for 4 monthes, but i compare myself with those who were extern on the floor before me. they are more comfortable with work load, they do the job faster, they know polices and procedures more than i do. bless those hearts who started extern program.
  4. by   Luvelyone
    Quote from blueberrybon
    okay. take a deep breath. my new job, which is on sub-acute at a nursing home/sub-acute center is running at nurse to patient ratio 1:22.

    crazy. that is the best word for how i feel. this seems to be a great place to learn as i go, but.....wow! no time to think.

    am not sure about the long run, have to give it a little time.

    blue
    ok...i have been on my first nursing job for a little over 2 months, and i hate it. it is a "skilled nursing facility". my nurse to patient ratio is 1:20, we have no wound nurse, so along with passing meds to 20 patients in a 2 hour window, we have to dress, change and pack all wounds, along with the documentation. we have bolus tube feeding that have to also be done within the 2 hour period and since i work 7 to 3, it's the worse shift, because i also end up having to toilet people since i only have 2 cna's for my unit, and they barely have enough time to get all of the residents up and dressed by 9:30 am. i have tried talking to our don :trout: and nha :trout: but they said that if we don't get all those things done, you'll be "written up on disciplinary action" because the state has already fined them this year and they will have to show disciplinary actions as part of their plan of correction, but don't worry it doesn't mean anything. at this point, i am looking for another job, as i worked too hard for my license to lose it. after beginning there, i found that most new nurses don't stay more than 90 days. now i see why. so yes...i am definitely looking at quitting. :angryfire:angryfire:angryfire:angryfire
  5. by   Scoobiedoo
    Well, I have been on the Med Floor since graduating in May 2007. I also worked in our ICU for 4 yrs prior to becoming a RN, and was a EMT before that.

    I have found it extremely hard to care for 6 Pts at a time working nights with NO Nurses Aide to help us, getting admissions, trying to do a very involved computer charting program, do care plans, etc. I don't' even take breaks or lunches it so bad. We always are short-staffed.

    This AM I got written up for not completing my computer charting before I left, and because I didn't make an entry on 1 of my Pts in 3 hrs when I was sitting a non-compliant seizure Pt that was deaf and mute, no family to sign, and the interpreter already gone for the evening. I could not do a full Admission on her b/c I couldn't ASK someone who was Alert x0, sleeping, and deaf & mute ANYTHING!

    It's sure a hard job. Eventually I plan my wife & I working our network marketing biz FT and retiring from nursing all together.

    PS I was offered an ICU position and start that on Dec 8th 2007 and ma hoping that taking care of 1-2 Pts - albeit sicker patients will STILL be easier than 6 or 7!
    Last edit by Scoobiedoo on Oct 30, '07
  6. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Quote from Scoobiedoo

    I have found it extremely hard to care for 6 Pts at a time working nights with NO Nurses Aide to help us, getting admissions, trying to do a very involved computer charting program, do care plans, etc. I don't' even take breaks or lunches it so bad. We always are short-staffed.
    We must work in the same unit. I feel exactly the same way. After my year is up (Summer 08), I will be looking for another unit to transfer to. People tell me to stay in that unit for a year, because it looks good to get that floor experience. I am back in school now for my BSN and then MSN. That will be my way out of the hospital.
  7. by   Nursey Face
    Quote from sleika
    I am very used to being spoken down and disrespected over food and drinks! At least in nursing the pressure will be about something with more meaning.
    I don't think that this is something nurses should accept and see as a normal aspect of being a nurse. I hope people wanting to enter nursing don't see this as a expectation that they are willing to put up with. We need not only excellent clinicians but people who are professional and are able to be assertive enough to help stop these types of behaviors towards nurses. I know that sounds unattainable but it makes me nervous when people go into nursing expecting and accepting poor treatment.
  8. by   Aimee03
    This thread has made me feel a lot better. I've been a nurse for 4 months, I hate my job! I would love to quit but I have to support myself so I need the job. I've already been chewed out for "being depressed" or "not enjoying my job" The nurse manager, actually told me The hospital I work at, maybe it wasn't right for me. Then she said, maybe nursing was not right for me. This came as a complete shock, I have NO idea where it came from. I know nursing school did NOT prepare me for the real world. I'm looking for a way OUT QUICK!!!!!!

    Amy
  9. by   oldiebutgoodie
    Quote from Aimee03
    This thread has made me feel a lot better. I've been a nurse for 4 months, I hate my job! I would love to quit but I have to support myself so I need the job. I've already been chewed out for "being depressed" or "not enjoying my job" The nurse manager, actually told me The hospital I work at, maybe it wasn't right for me. Then she said, maybe nursing was not right for me. This came as a complete shock, I have NO idea where it came from. I know nursing school did NOT prepare me for the real world. I'm looking for a way OUT QUICK!!!!!!

    Amy
    Hi, Amy,
    Don't sweat it. Some nurse managers like to chew people out for stupid stuff like that. At least it wasn't a med error or patient fall or something. Of COURSE you don't like your job. The first year really stinks--it's overwhelming. Your manager should have known better. Of course, I have no idea where some of these nurse managers come from. Mars, maybe.

    Hang in there. You may want to look at a different floor or hospital. I quit my first job after 4 months at an ICU where I had 15 different preceptors. I had no problem finding another job. I have bounced around a little, but have now found my niche.

    Take care, I'm thinking about you!

    Oldiebutgoodie
  10. by   blueberrybon
    Adding to my earlier post:

    My first 8/9 mos as an LPN was in a pediatric dr's office, which was fine except for the fact that it was very busy (no time to go to lunch, or even pee for that matter) and I did mostly MA work.

    I decided I needed to get a job where the work more closely related to what I actually went to school for, so I got a job at a nursing home on the sub-acute wing. I work days, and the patient load is 22:1.

    I'm learning a lot, and for that I'm very thankful, but the means by which I'm learning is going to kill me. I, like so many others I've read about on these threads, have precious little time to think. It's simply a race from the time you clock in, till the time you clock out (and you MUST clock out on time).

    I believe it would be easier for me if I didn't have so many factors working against me;

    1) low self esteem, coupled with being a new nurse
    2) low self esteem, coupled with patients demanding things
    3) low self esteem, coupled with having to chart and then actually seeing with my own two eyes how stupid I sound
    4) low self esteem, coupled with aids who don't respect me because of my inability to be a leader
    5) low self esteem, coupled with the fact that I can't seem to get my job done on time, EVER
    I could go on... but you get the picture.

    I can't believe that this company is going to give me a year (seems to be the general consensus) to get my act together enough to feel good and confident.

    I worry that the charge nurses are rolling their eyes at me when I go the other direction. Not that they act like it, contrarily every one is very nice where I work, but I still feel that there is the occasional "Oh brother, what DOES she know?"

    So absolutely yes, I have thought of quitting just out of the sheer hating to be so down on myself all the time. I haven't figured out what I'm going to do yet, so until then I'll play it day-by-day.

    I felt like quitting today (a couple of times actually) but I didn't...

    Blue
    Last edit by blueberrybon on Nov 1, '07
  11. by   omeg
    I've been orienting with a preceptor since September. I go off orientation in just 3 more weeks. I'm not very excited about it. I was considering quitting because the workload is just too stressful, with too many interruptions, too many priorities, too many tasks. I come home exhausted after a 12 hour shift and can only stay asleep for 4 hours b/c I start thinking about all the things I did or didn't do during work and how I might have harmed patients by my actions or inactions. I'm going to try for six months of experience and then look for a different type of nursing job. Maybe public health will be less stressful.
  12. by   nursecompassion
    I signed on to my hospital in the end of August and started on the unit a few weeks later, minus about 3 weeks of classes (nursing orientation, iv therapy, tele), I've actually been on the unit with a preceptor for 7 weeks. There are many moments when I question the safety of my license by staying here. Our average pt ratio is between 1:5 or 1:6, however if an LPN is working the floor then we have to "focus" on their pt as well, so you might have 5 or 6 patients of your own and then focus on 1 or 2 more. We pass all of our meds, do the tx's, assessments, everything! It is a med/surg, renal, tele unit, and the acuity of our patients can be very high at times and overwhelming. Numerous times we have sent patients to the ICU. It's crazy!!! I haven't cried yet, almost did one day because I had only seen one of patients one time and was very unorganized. It's getting better, and I believe I just have to stay positive and be strong and continue to ask questions and believe in what I am doing! Good luck to all of you! God Bless!
    jules
  13. by   ren46730
    I would quit in a minute but I keep getting "let go"!!!! First job, surgery- they told me i didn't "fit in", second was DON in LTC, told me they didn't have time to train. I loved the residents and the staff but the nurse coordinator and administrators were big fat liars. I'm gonna stay but just because i worked so hard to get my license

close