Fired New-grad, Jumps Into FNP Program?

  1. My cousin is a RN who got fired from her newgrad med-surg job after 6 months. Since she cant get another newgrad hospital job (graduated BSN >1 year), and she dosent have at least 1 full year of experience to apply for regular RN-1 positions, her solution is to jump into a full-time online FNP program to "reset" her career path.

    Her thinking is the autonomy of FNP work will best suit her career at this point. She feels her lack of previous medical experience was why she failed on such a busy hospital unit. She is regretting not starting out in a SNF, LTC or equivalent. At this point, its best to learn from the mistakes and move forward. Problem is she's having difficulty doing so & I feel she is jumping to FNP out of desperation. She also emphasizes that since RN's arent typically staffed in clinics, chances of her being hired as an RN anywhere with (dare I say) "less" demand for experience are very slim chances.

    I want to advise her to keep RN job hunting, however I agree that because she got fired for multiple disciplines at her large Texas hospital, she's nearly ruined her chances before her career even began. Ive explained to her that hunting FNP jobs with a diploma mill degree will not be any easier than job hunting for a "second chance" RN job would be. She will just be in even MORE debt after her FNP, double the debt in fact, which will add to her already stressful predicament. Not to mention that her former RN disciplines will still follow her as an NP. It will be especially painful having to explain the 6 month firing and failure to maintain acute care RN standards, while trying to convince employers shes capable of the higher responsibilities as a NP.

    Ive been looking into it (especially since there is a threat that she may have to couch surf with me until this all resolves, Lol). I just dont know how to advise my cousin. Please Help! Thank you AN
    •  
  2. Poll: Should she:

    • Find RN job & be honest why she got disciplined/fired.

      42.42% 14
    • Seek RN jobs & give standard "wasnt a good fit" answers.

      54.55% 18
    • Leave 6 month medsurg experience off of RN resume entirely.

      9.09% 3
    • FNP program is a viable move, just avoid privileges at former company.

      0% 0
    • Look into other majors (MBA, etc), she's not cut out to be in medicine.

      6.06% 2
    33 Votes / Multiple Choice
  3. 8 Comments

  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Breathing16
    My cousin is a RN who got fired from her newgrad med-surg job after 6 months. Since she cant get another newgrad hospital job (graduated BSN >1 year), and she dosent have at least 1 full year of experience to apply for regular RN-1 positions, her solution is to jump into a full-time online FNP program to "reset" her career path.

    Her thinking is the autonomy of FNP work will best suit her career at this point. She feels her lack of previous medical experience was why she failed on such a busy hospital unit. She is regretting not starting out in a SNF, LTC or equivalent. At this point, its best to learn from the mistakes and move forward. Problem is she's having difficulty doing so & I feel she is jumping to FNP out of desperation. She also emphasizes that since RN's arent typically staffed in clinics, chances of her being hired as an RN anywhere with (dare I say) "less" demand for experience are very slim chances.

    I want to advise her to keep RN job hunting, however I agree that because she got fired for multiple disciplines at her large Texas hospital, she's nearly ruined her chances before her career even began. Ive explained to her that hunting FNP jobs with a diploma mill degree will not be any easier than job hunting for a "second chance" RN job would be. She will just be in even MORE debt after her FNP, double the debt in fact, which will add to her already stressful predicament. Not to mention that her former RN disciplines will still follow her as an NP. It will be especially painful having to explain the 6 month firing and failure to maintain acute care RN standards, while trying to convince employers shes capable of the higher responsibilities as a NP.

    Ive been looking into it (especially since there is a threat that she may have to couch surf with me until this all resolves, Lol). I just dont know how to advise my cousin. Please Help! Thank you AN
    It's hard to make a major life decision for someone with just a few paragraphs of second-hand information. Is she even asking you for advice? It sounds like she already has a plan, whether good or bad.
  5. by   dishes
    She is going to make her own choices regarding her career, you do not have control over her decisions. The only thing you have control over is saying no to her couch surfing in your home, you are not obligated to enable her financial dysfunction.
  6. by   Emergent
    When she's in $200,000 non-bankruptable debt, tell her, please don't run to Uncle Sam to bail her out. And, don't take care of any of my loved ones.

    If she fails as a nurse practitioner, is medical school her next stop?
  7. by   Rocknurse
    You know, stuff like this just hurts my heart. Here I am 25 years as a nurse, multiple certifications, a BSN graduate with summa cum laude, admin and managerial experience, and I'm 3 years into an acute NP program about to graduate, and sometimes I wake up in the morning and doubt myself. After reading this ridonculousness, (yes I spelled that right), I will never doubt myself again. The sheer chutzpa of some people never fails to amaze and disgust me. Tell her good luck and bid her on her way. I have no words.
  8. by   mmc51264
    I had to have at least 2 years of nursing to get my MSN in a NON-clinical specialty. What programs are allowing inexperienced nurses into an FNP program? My guess is the trouble that she had as an RN will follow her into the FNP program.
  9. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from Rocknurse
    You know, stuff like this just hurts my heart. Here I am 25 years as a nurse, multiple certifications, a BSN graduate with summa cum laude, admin and managerial experience, and I'm 3 years into an acute NP program about to graduate, and sometimes I wake up in the morning and doubt myself. After reading this ridonculousness, (yes I spelled that right), I will never doubt myself again. The sheer chutzpa of some people never fails to amaze and disgust me. Tell her good luck and bid her on her way. I have no words.
    Some NP programs will take anyone. We've really diluted NP standards. It kind of makes nursing as a whole profession look ridiculous when we have NPs that don't understand basic concepts.
  10. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from Breathing16
    she got fired for multiple disciplines at her large Texas hospital, she's nearly ruined her chances before her career even began.
    Were these reported to the BON? Does she have a clear license?

    Other than that we can all make assumptions but the truth is none of us know whether this is a good choice for her or not. I will say, as I have many times in the past, the only good reason to move to the APN role is a desire to function in that role. Anything less will be, ultimately, disappointing.
  11. by   Fleurtyluxe11
    Can you tell us what the reasons for her termination was? MULTIPLE reasons could be multiple tardiness, failure to chart certain things, etc....minor details to major things like not booking up heart patients to EKGs to, falsifying records, diverting meds....things that could put her license in jeopardy.


    I don't think any nurse has any business applying for, or attending, NP school without at least a solid year of full-time practice under their belt (Med-surg/ICU/ER, not mother/baby, doctor's office or OR). I would like at least 2 years, but I know most reputable schools require at least 1 year full-time practice under general on intensive practice before they're eligible to apply, making it about 1.5 years before they start. I think it's a TERRIBLE "fall-back" plan for her to go to NP school and have 6 months and a termination for "multiple disciplines" of what level is unknown. I think have graduate school as a back-up is a slap in the face to people who bust their backs to put themselves through it while still supporting their family and such. I'm 27 and I'm going to graduate in May with my FNP, so I know first hand how difficult it is and her classmates will not take kindly to her experience, I promise you that.

    If she loves nursing (and hasn't risked her license with the BON), she needs to stick it out and apply to other positions and explain in the best way possible that yes, she made some mistakes - first big girl job, stress of the unit, whatever, didn't handle it well - and that she has worked out things and figured out the way to be the best nurse possible is to do X, Y, Z (maybe see a therapist a couple times to figure it out - I know people who have lost their jobs and have done this and it helped in their job search later) for their new positions and how she learned from her mistakes how to be an excellent nurse and hopefully a mentor.



    i really hope she takes this opportunity seriously. But, if she isn't serious about nursing or this opportunity, a new career path is the way to go. DO NOT GO TO GRADUATE NURSING SCHOOL OR PA SCHOOL OR MED SCHOOL - those are not options for someone who can't last 90 days out of orientation without breaking handfuls of rules.


    I hope this helps.

close