FIRED I didn't even see it coming , Please advise - page 2

by Ms.MayaRN

14,248 Views | 52 Comments

I'm a new grad graduated Jan 2012 hired into a Med Surge position in a level 2 hospital in Brooklyn. one week left to be on my own and completing my 8 week orientation I get fired. I didn't see it coming, never got written up ,... Read More


  1. 0
    That's the sting been told not a good fit and not given a reason . Although it happens you don't want it to happen to you because I don't want to sound as poor me because I am not. I wish there the issue would had been brought to my attention.

    I was aware that I was a bit late on my medication administration but as a new nurse in a med surge unit that has constant patients in and out of the unit to MRI, CT , etc I would had gotten better with time management as I become more experience.

    I do not believe I did something unprofessional to my knowledge.
  2. 0
    I'm sure there where signs but I didn't pick up on any because I was never brought to my attention. If I have to pick a sign as to reading the radar or the culture . I would say everyone was too nice .
  3. 1
    I know it stings that you were let go without any warning. But you know what? It does get better, and I speak that with personal experience.

    My first job out of school was in a rural town. I worked there for about a month and was let go. Reason being that the facility there just didn't have the staff or time or resource to accommodate a new grad...that and I was slow at doing things. So it was the same old "not a good fit" reason. I was down; but I KNEW I had to move on. And move on I did. I soon found another job in another rural site that was more accommodating to new staff, and I quickly learned to get a routine going. I worked there for about 10 months, and managed to get a full time position back in the city.

    So, moral of the story: Things do get better. Now update your resume (I would leave the experience you had on--SOME experience beats NOTHING), practice how you're going to answer the dreaded "Why did you leave your previous employer", and rock your next job hunting sessions.

    Good luck!
    Ms.MayaRN likes this.
  4. 5
    Way back when, I was a landscaping supervisor. I often tried to venture out into other fields, I was only doing landscaping because it was what I had done when I was younger, I did not like it at all.

    One winter, I landed a job in a quality control lab with a company that did a lot of chemical contracting work. It was my DREAM JOB. Walking distance from my apt., a good bit better pay, benefits including vacation time and retirement, indoor work away from the snow, it was everything I was looking for in a job and my plan was to work for this company until I retired.

    I got along with my co-workers, the boss never had any critical comments for me, I was doing quality work at a good pace and of course I followed all the common sense "good worker" rules: arrive early, never stay late unless they asked me to, stayed well within the confines of m lunch break time limits, in perfect compliance with uniform policies.

    After three weeks I was let go. They sited "unsafe work habits/practices" as the reason. Someone had seen me walking down a flight of steps with "heavy boxes" in my hands (a safety no-no in this place, they had transport elevators you put stuff on so you never had to carry anything up and down stairs).

    The truth was, the box I had been carrying was only slightly bigger than a shoe box and it was empty. The only reason I was even carrying it was because another tech had walked upstairs with it, emptied the contents, and I was taking it back to the supply room to be refilled.

    I called everyone who would listen to explain the story: shift supervisors, the manager, HR. I even tried to get in touch with with the company president. It was to no avail. Those who bothered to listen, and they were few and far in between, gave me a prepared answer and informed me there was nothing they could do for me. In fact, I believe one supervisor did say "Maybe you just weren't a good fit. I'd move on."

    Well, years later (like, three years) I got the truth. I ran into one of the supervisors who bothered to try to help me. He had left the company not long after I did, but under his own circumstances. It turns out, the contract my unit had been working on was cancelled by the company. Why the contract was cancelled was never discussed with the employees, but it was heard through the wind that the client had missed a couple payments on the contract. The company had over hired expecting this contract to last many years and was left scrambling to find work for the people who were left in the lab. Some people had to take short term part time work until something opened up elsewhere that was full time. Others, like myself, who had limited time with the company, were simply let go because there just wan not enough work to go around.

    Keeping us, the newer workers, would have meant forcing a number of other people into part time status. These are people who had been there for a number of years, owned homes in the area and had proven their value.

    All of us who had been let go were given "You're not a good fit" and "Your work habits were not what we are looking for" explanations.

    Not that your M/S unit had a cancelled contract or anything. But, I think it goes to show, the behaviors of companies/employers is unpredictable and never well explained to us, the employees. They have their reasons for doing things and don't feel obligated to explain them to us. Don't waste your time trying to apply logic to their actions. You'll never have all the details or the whole story to work with so..........you'll never completely connect the dots.
    MBARNBSN, BrendaH84, Ms.MayaRN, and 2 others like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Sadly in New York State IIRC the first three months are considered probation status and thus one can be terminated for any or no reason.
    This is not unique to NY nor, IMHO, is it "sad." Everywhere I've ever worked, in five different states over the years, every employer has specified in writing that employment can be terminated at any time, for any (or no) reason, by either party (employer or employee) during the probationary period, which is as long as the employer specifies (I've worked at places with three month probationary periods, places with six months probations, and one employer that had a nine-month formal probationary period).
  6. 0
    Sorry to hear that. If I were you, though, I would sit down and talk with the manager to see how you were "not a good fit." It will help you to elucidate why you weren't a good fit when you interview for your next position. And, if it's something you can change, then you can improve next time. But, you have to do what you're comfortable with doing. Being slightly late with meds as a new grad is normal, and even experienced nurses are late sometimes for things out of a nurse's control. Emergencies, procedures, etc.
  7. 1
    If possible it would seem important to find out why they felt that way. They may not be willing to tell you, but it is worth a try.
    elkpark likes this.
  8. 1
    I also think its a good idea to sit with the manager to find out why you werent a good fit. You need to know what your downfalls are so that you can work on them in your next job.
    elkpark likes this.
  9. 2
    I agree with Crunch, itsmejuli and Good Morning Gil. They won't rehire you but the way I see it their honest feedback might be the only potential value you take away from the whole mess, and maybe a heads up about potential pitfalls in your next job.

    I'm so sorry this happened to you. Very best wishes for you to find the good fit so you can really grow as a new nurse. ((MsMayaRN))
    Ms.MayaRN and elkpark like this.
  10. 0
    Thank you for your reply MPKH

    I do believe something is better than nothing but I'm afraid . I didn't see the me been fired not even a warning side or I was so naive , so grateful, happy to be there I miss the radar of what was going on but 7 weeks is just so little to put as an experience.


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