Fired from my first RN job after only 2 weeks. - page 2

I am a new grad who graduated this summer with my BSN. I was let go from my first nursing job only after 2 weeks. I graduated with honors and had my capstone in a busy Emergency Department. I started... Read More

  1. by   JKL33
    Quote from brandy1017
    I know it doesn't seem like it now, but you really dodged a bullet with that hospital!
    Yep.

    There was either some massive problem we haven't heard about or else they had zero intention of following through with training and decided to cut their losses. Sounds like there is some chaos going on that has nothing to do with the orientee so I give the OP the benefit of the doubt.
  2. by   mrsboots87
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Yes. Because all new grads must have been adu aged exactly like you were and should all be ready to safely take full loads without questions by 2 weeks in.

    Get real.

    Most nursing programs don't prepare new grads to be proficient in full patient care, charting, time management, whatever. They prepare the new grad to pass the NCLEX and to k ow the basics in order to be safe. Do t blame the new grad for not being ready in 2 weeks. Blame the nursing schools that focus more on the test then the preparedness for the real world (AKA the majority of them).

    New grad orientation is about getting confident in what you do k ow and k owing when to ask for help. It is also where skills learned are practiced in real life and is the place where you have a safety net of a preceptor to prevent patient harm while guiding good practice. Most adults require more than 2 weeks to learn a brand new career.

    A seasoned nurse needs 2 weeks or less. Not a new grad. You sound just as bad as the preceptor being described in the OP.
  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    If you've only done mother and baby up until now, with all due respect, you might not have a clue. Two weeks is nowhere close to an adequate orientation time.
  4. by   Snowdin
    Quote from AJJKRN
    And just to piggyback on the sage advice Sour Lemon has provided to you, don't ever tell your coworkers or your management team that you intend to transfer to another area even if you plan on doing so years away. If you did, this was probably the first nail in your coffin.
    This seems like good advice, and I hate to sound naive, but why is this? I'm still a student nurse and still far off from getting my first nursing job, but I'm very curious about what you've said..
  5. by   Lil Nel
    Quote from Mountainrnbsn
    I am starting to panic as I've been applying to jobs today that the one question if I have ever been asked terminate or resign from a job on job applications. I don't want this to haunt me for the rest of my career.
    As one poster stated, we have all resigned from a job. Completely forget that you ever worked at the horrible hospital. You were there just two weeks! No time at all.

    I wouldn't list the job on a resume, questionnaire, or anything. I would behave as though I was applying for my first nursing job, and go from there.

    Good luck. You will be fine.

    Yes, new graduates are slow. Many of us of terrified of being sued, pulled into a lawsuit, etc., at all times. That is why I constantly second guess myself and double check all of my charting.

    I won't apologize for that. It is what nursing has become in 2017.
  6. by   caliotter3
    No advice, just an observation after reading the beginning of your post. A new nurse who graduated at the top of her class in a program near me years ago, also did not make it at her first job. It became a matter of discussion in the local nursing community. It could very well be that you were targeted because of your "top of the class" status. I would not highlight that fact on resumes or applications to future jobs to preclude that possible factor. Easier for you to do now that you have this experience on your record.
  7. by   evastone
    Quote from Lil Nel
    As one poster stated, we have all resigned from a job. Completely forget that you ever worked at the horrible hospital. You were there just two weeks! No time at all.

    I wouldn't list the job on a resume, questionnaire, or anything. I would behave as though I was applying for my first nursing job, and go from there.
    Love this! As far as I am concerned, if you didn't make it through orientation, then you never really had the job. Ergo, it does not belong in a resume. A nurse really close to me made it through 3 weeks of orientation before she and a couple of others were fired. She was told similar words of "encouragement" that you were told. Her resumes never included that job. Today, she is a nurse at a level one trauma center and thanks her lucky stars that her first hospital didn't work out.
  8. by   babyNP.
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    To be completely honest, you probably weren't safe with 2 weeks orientation but just didn't know any better.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Wandrlust
    no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Its not under the preceptors license. She may be on orientation, but she is a nurse in her own right, is she not? She has her own license.

    Quote from mrsboots87
    Most adults require more than 2 weeks to learn a brand new career.
    This is an excellent point.
    Last edit by Julius Seizure on Nov 3
  10. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Your views certainly seem to have changed from last November when you were concerned about a 6 week orientation being enough for an experienced nurse in a new specialty. Did you end up taking this job?
    Quote from Wandrlust
    Hello!

    I have an opportunity to switch specialties from postpartum/nursery/nicu to pediatrics at a different hospital.

    When I applied I had thought the position was for nursery, but it's actually for pediatrics and she said they like their pedi nurses to have pedi experience. So, I'm not really sure why they called me lol I told them I don't have pedi experience and she said they give 6 weeks orientation.

    My question is, will 6 weeks be enough orientation? I would love to switch specialties, since I've been in this same specialty now almost 7 years and nobody would hire/train me in a different specialty when I tried in the past.

    I'm also nervous, because I love my specialty, but I think I'd love pediatrics, but I'm not sure since you never really know until you start.
  11. by   Lil Nel
    Yes, an orientee has their own license. But during orientation, the orientee is operating under the license of the preceptor.

    My NM made this very clear just few weeks ago, when she sent out an e-mail discussing the importance of preceptors really teaching their orientees, and not just letting the orientee pick up the slack and do all the work.
  12. by   nursemike
    Quote from Mountainrnbsn
    I am starting to panic as I've been applying to jobs today that the one question if I have ever been asked terminate or resign from a job on job applications. I don't want this to haunt me for the rest of my career.
    Do not panic. As others have said, you're lucky not to have gotten stuck in this mess. "Don't have time to teach new nurses?" That's a director who'll be looking for a new job, soon. Two things about nursing: most of the staff are young women. They get married. They get pregnant. They move away. Also, a lot of places are offering $10,000 sign-on bonuses. Not long ago, during the pits of recession, hospitals were looking for BSNs with at least one year's experience. Lately, the market is swinging back to what it was when I graduated in 2005--if you can spell RN, somebody wants you,

    As for your next job, there may be a little to learn from the previous one. Mostly what to avoid. If you can, arrange a shadow day with any unit you are interested in. Get a feel for the climate. Definitely ask about ratios. For normal acuity, 5:1 is about right. I do neuro stepdown with 3:1, and some nights I get bombed. Realistically, you might have to settle for 6:1. My facility when from a firm 5:1 to 6:1 because it has been hard to find enough staffing. I think ortho may even hit 7:1 on some nightshifts. (Ortho patients are harder than a lot of people think, but a GOOD night may entail mostly passing pain meds. I worked ortho as a transporter, and one of my duties was changing out code carts when they expired. Still, not every night is a good night, and people who aren't sick aren't in hospitals.)

    I probably wouldn't lead with wanting to eventually transfer to critical care. Most interviewers will know that's in your mind, because it's in a lot of minds. I'd go with something along the lines of, "I want to take the time to develop my skills while I learn where my best fit might be." And I'd give serious thought to asking for med-surg, because you will see a lot, or maybe surg-trauma if you're pretty sure you want ED. Both are hard places to work, but you will learn a ton and might just decide either is where you were meant to be--although both tend to have a pretty high turnover, because people do tend to move into more specialized care. THAT kind of turnover tends to make them accustomed to training newbs. Just keep in mind that some units have high turnover because they are toxic.

    Right now, you're probably feeling humiliated. Don't. But humble is good. You don't want to sound cocky, but it wouldn't hurt to go into an interview at least a little aware that you are interviewing them as they are interviewing you. It's a seller's market--you can afford to be a little picky.
  13. by   MelEpiRN
    @Snowdin- a couple of reasons you don't want to mention thoughts of switching units: orienting is extremely time consuming and expensive. Many people are putting a lot of effort into molding and educating you, they may take offense at the idea that you don't even want to be there. It's kind of seen as wasting their time.
    It kind of hurts when you love your job and you work with people who are telling you this is a pit stop (my words, not the OP) on the way to 'something better' (when logically it happens all the time and we can all understand people need to work where their passion is). It's just best to keep it to yourself.
    It also takes up an FTE that could be occupied by somebody who actually wants to be there.
    Last edit by MelEpiRN on Nov 3 : Reason: addition

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