Ethical advice needed for a new grad... - page 8

by AnnaleaRN

10,040 Views | 73 Comments

What would YOU do? Say, hypothetically, that you are a new graduate RN at your first job. During morning med pass at a SNF, you witness another RN entering incorrect times for med administration on multiple patients in order... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from hope3456
    Do they enforce this? What happens when they ARE late? How are your meds scheduled - some at 8am some at 9 AM ect? Do you use scanners?
    I have never worked at a nursing home that used scanners.

    Nothing happens if medications are administered late, unless management or the state surveyor dislikes the nurse for some reason. In that case, they'd make a huge example out of the nurse and possibly refer his/her license number to the state BON for medication errors. Then, the state BON would formally reprimand and/or issue fines and sanctions if the nurse cannot disprove the allegations made against him/her.
  2. 0
    We have hour before and hour after. And I've never heard of any consequences from giving them late. I'm sure the EMAR records the times but to my knowledge no one has ever been confronted on giving meds late.
  3. 2
    I would certainly not bring this to anyone's attention unless you are absolutely certain that you are able to complete the med pass within the allotted time frame 100% of the time.
    ricksy and wooh like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I have never worked at a nursing home that used scanners.

    Nothing happens if medications are administered late, unless management or the state surveyor dislikes the nurse for some reason. In that case, they'd make a huge example out of the nurse and possibly refer his/her license number to the state BON for medication errors. Then, the state BON would formally reprimand and/or issue fines and sanctions if the nurse cannot disprove the allegations made against him/her.
    And, the reason nothing happens is that there is usually no clinical significance to being early or late (within reason, of course). Most meds (please note: I wrote MOST meds, not all) work as well given BID as they do given q 12 hours, as well given TID as q 8 hours, etc. Get your post-prandial insullin and pain meds on board on time, then pass your others. Again, there are exceptions, but you are smart and well educated. You know which meds are time critical and which are not, and if you do not, a pharmacist will know.


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