Does anyone here love their job? - page 3

There's so many stories here about how people hate their nursing jobs. Does anyone here really love their job? Also, out of curiosity how long have you been a nurse, what shift do you work and what... Read More

  1. by   NYNewGrad
    Quote from Kristen_RN
    I absolutely love my job! I'm a new nurse (graduated in May). I work in the second busiest ER in Dallas-Forth Worth. We see over 200 patients a day. My ratio is either 5:1 or 4:1, depending on the staffing. I've just finished a 12 week internship, and I am now on my own. I carry a trauma room, and 4 regular rooms. They put me through ACLS certification. My preceptors were great. I work day shift 7A-7P, 3 days a week. It is pretty laid back, depending on the charge nurse. Only downfall are the clicks. There are 2 during day shift. I've been let into one, but not the other. So, it's a little hard when I have to work the other clicks schedule, but if you just do your work, you can get through it. To sum it up: I'm 22, an RN, work day shift, only 3 days a week, in the area that I love! It's amazing!
    Hey Kristen!

    The thought of doing ER as a new grad with ZERO confidence both scares and thrills me. Can you describe what you think made your transition so successful? Before I accept this position, or any other position for that matter, what specifically should I look out for? How do I find out if a unit has supportive RNs - do I go to the unit on my own and ask to speak to a nurse for a moment, or should I ask the recruiter/manager to introduce me to someone who I can speak to?

    12 weeks orientation sounds really quick - what exactly did it consist of? Classroom, just one on one with preceptor...?

    I appreciate any tips or advice you or anyone else has for me...
    Last edit by NYNewGrad on May 16, '06
  2. by   jwrightstone
    I have to say that I truley love my job. I graduated in May passed boards in July and have been working in a 16 bed ICU since mid May. The staff has been wonderful, of course there have been moments and some are more difficult than others but I have found that my psyc and theraputic communication has helped me to deal with cranky Dr at 2am and uncooperative coworkers just as much as it has with my patients. I have already learned so much and know that I have much more to learn. I never hesitate to ask a question even if the staff seems unapproachable it really is in the way you ask. It is also so important to know what you know and even more important to know what you don't know and not be afarid to admit it and ask for help. I have never asked for help and not been able to find someone to help. I have at times gotten a sigh or a frustrated comment but I always try to do it on their time if patient safety is not at stake. I am always very thankful even if I received attitude to start with and I let them know that I may be frustrating for them but that my patient is my main concern not my pride. Taking it with a smile and trying to understand their point of view has really made it easy for me. I know that I work with some very talented and knowledegable people and I try to use their skills and knowledge to help make me a better nurse. I also am always the first person to offer help to any staff from CNA, unit sec. or any other RN and that helps to keep them patient with me. It is really to the point now where they know if I ask I need advice of assistance and they are all more than willing to help. Also try to be attentive to who and when you approach some people are just not AM / PM people of some tend to be more task oriented and do not do well if you interupt them in the middle of something. I know that everyone is not lucky enough to have people around them that truley want them to succeed and I think if you get in an environment where they are not willing to help you then keep looking because there are great places out there to work and you really want you first job in nursing to be a positive one. Just keep in mind we are all human and try to stay out of the gossip ring it will only bring you down and make you wonder what may be said behind or back. Best of luck to you! sorry for any spelling errors I have just worked 16 hours and been up over 24 hours!
    Quote from rockysocks
    There's so many stories here about how people hate their nursing jobs. Does anyone here really love their job? Also, out of curiosity how long have you been a nurse, what shift do you work and what specialty do you work in? I am a student excited about becoming a nurse, but am a little scared by the negativity, I would love to hear some of your positive thoughts about your jobs, if any! Thanks in advance!
  3. by   Kristen_RN
    Hey NYNEW GRAD!

    Well, what I think made my transition smooth, was the fact that I have been working in this ER for over a year now. My hospital has an "Extern" program. Basically, what that is, is they let you work (whatever hours you want), pay you well, and they let you practice your skills, and learn the flow of teh ER. I did that for close to a year...pretty much my entire last year of school. It was a wonder ful program. It really helps to know the nurses that you will be working with, the doctors (and their habits), the rest of teh staff, the flow of ther ER, and the location of everything. During my internship, we had 12 interns, 6 were externs before, and 6 were not. Of the 12 of us, the 6 who were externs before were overall slightly advanced (we got to 5 patients faster, and got let out of internship faster).

    What I might suggest to you, it seeing if the unit manager/director/educator would let you shadow a nurse for a day. That would give you the flow, the attitude of the nurses, and the rest of the staff, and an overall feel for the place. If not, then I would try to talk to someone in charge and ask them questions about the nursing staff. For the most part, how your director/educator is, is how the staff will be.

    My 12 week internship consisted of 6 weeks classroom and 6 weeks clinical. The first 6 weeks we spent half the day in the classroom learning, and the second half of the day on the floor either shadowing a nurse or taking up to 2 patients, but having the primary nurse sign off on everything we did and check our charts. The second 6 weeks was out on the floor, actually working a preceptors' shift. Since we had so many interns this time around, each preceptor had 2 interns. We worked our way up to 5 patients. The preceptor didn't do any of the work, she was just there to answer questions for us.

    I think that overall, we had a really good internship. I learned so much. I had a great preceptor who was sooo supportive and understanding. It was so nice to know that she really cared about my succeeding and learning.

    Good luck in whatever position you decide to accept. BYW where in NY are you? I started nursing school in NY (that's where I'm from), and finisehd it here in TX.

    ~Kristen


    Quote from NYNewGrad
    Hey Kristen!

    I was so happy to read your post! I'm a new grad, 15 month BSN program, (just turned 20 ) and was offered ER day shift in a really busy hospital. (At this point it might be part time and filling in per diem).

    The thought of doing ER as a new grad with ZERO confidence both scares and thrills me. Can you describe what you think made your transition so successful? Before I accept this position, or any other position for that matter, what specifically should I look out for? How do I find out if a unit has supportive RNs - do I go to the unit on my own and ask to speak to a nurse for a moment, or should I ask the recruiter/manager to introduce me to someone who I can speak to?

    12 weeks orientation sounds really quick - what exactly did it consist of? Classroom, just one on one with preceptor...?

    I appreciate any tips or advice you or anyone else has for me...
  4. by   BatsonPICURN
    I'm a new grad (May 05) and work in the only PICU and Children's Hospital in the state. I love my job. We have just completed an extensive preceptorship and training. Tons of modules on diseases processes, cont cardiac meds, Vent management, HFOV, CVVH, post op hearts, ECMO etc etc. and 4 test even. I thought tests were done when i got out of nursing school. HA!....but the environment for which you work plays a huge role in your overall job satisfaction. I was a student on the unit for 1.5 years while in school before becoming staff. So i had the advantage of knowing the other staff, docs, and esp. how things are done. I would suggest if you know your interests see if you can get a student nursing position if available. Not only will you gain tons of experience from just being on the unit but it will help your decision making in finding what job is right for you. BONUS i thought it helped tremendiously in nursing school just having some of that knowledge in class and seeing in practice made it much easier to retain.
  5. by   saadb
    Quote from rockysocks
    There's so many stories here about how people hate their nursing jobs. Does anyone here really love their job? Also, out of curiosity how long have you been a nurse, what shift do you work and what specialty do you work in? I am a student excited about becoming a nurse, but am a little scared by the negativity, I would love to hear some of your positive thoughts about your jobs, if any! Thanks in advance!
    I have been a nurse for over 30 years. I have never "hated" my job. Even the one I got fired from. Some companies, supervisors, co-workers are easier to work with than others, but the pride and satisfaction I have felt when the patient care outcomes are positive, outweigh the other "stuff".
  6. by   saadb
    Quote from rockysocks
    There's so many stories here about how people hate their nursing jobs. Does anyone here really love their job? Also, out of curiosity how long have you been a nurse, what shift do you work and what specialty do you work in? I am a student excited about becoming a nurse, but am a little scared by the negativity, I would love to hear some of your positive thoughts about your jobs, if any! Thanks in advance!
    I just re-read your post. I currently work in a gero/psych unit as nurse manager, day shift. I also work the other shifts during staff shortages. I have worked Long term care, hospice, home health, and in my early years, ER and ICU. My first love is probably ER, next would be home health. I feel that I got a great foundation in nursing by working several years as an LPN in a small hospitial, on the med/surg unit. Good luck on your career. I encourage people who are trying to decide on nursing as a career, to work in a hospitial or nh for awhile; have some familiarity with what basic nursing is before they invest time and money in an education in nursing. We all do get burnout though, and some jobs are just not a good fit.

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